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Look Who’s Behavin” October 9, 2009 Dr. Alexa Posny.

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Presentation on theme: "Look Who’s Behavin” October 9, 2009 Dr. Alexa Posny."— Presentation transcript:

1 Look Who’s Behavin” October 9, 2009 Dr. Alexa Posny

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4 Warm-Up You are driving along in your car on wild, stormy night. You pass by a bus stop, and you see three people waiting for the bus. 1. An old lady who looks as if she is about to die. 2. An old friend who once saved your life. 3. The perfect man (or) woman you have been dreaming about. Which one would you choose to offer a ride to, knowing that there could only be one passenger in your car?

5 Warm-Up Give the car keys to the old friend Let him take the old lady to the hospital You stay behind and wait for the bus with man/woman of your dreams

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7 “There are really only three types of people: Those who make things happen; Those who watch things happen; and Those who ask, ‘What happened?’” Ann Landers

8 Rules… You will not marry during the course of your contract. You are not to keep company with men. You may not loiter downtown in ice cream stores. You may not dress in bright colors. You may under no circumstances dye your hair. You must wear at least two petticoats. for Teachers

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10 Expectations (Not Rules) for Students

11 “Children are eager and capable learners…” What We Know…

12 Words Heard per hour Affirmatives per hour Prohibitions per hour Professional family child Research (Hart & Risley, 1995)

13 Words Heard per hour Affirmatives per hour Prohibitions per hour Professional family child Working class child Research (Hart & Risley, 1995)

14 Words Heard per hour Affirmatives per hour Prohibitions per hour Professional family child Working class child Child living in poverty Research (Hart & Risley, 1995)

15 “Early intervening services…are services for children in kindergarten through grade 12 (with a particular emphasis on children in kindergarten through grade 3) who have not been identified as needing special education and related services, but who need additional academic and behavioral support to succeed in a general education environment.” How…

16 “Early learning begets later learning and early success breeds later success…The later in life we attempt to repair early deficits, the costlier remediation becomes…” James Heckman, Nobel Prize-Winner, Economics, 2000 Why…

17 What We Know… “There is a greater tragedy than being labeled as a slow learner--and that is being treated as one.”

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22 “A longitudinal study of 407 students found that 74% of the children whose difficulty in reading was first identified at nine years of age or older continued to read in the lowest quintile throughout their middle and high school years.” What We Know…

23 The earlier school staff can identify students’ difficulties, the quicker and less expensive the task is to help them catch up The longer a student goes without assistance, the longer the remediation time and the more intense the services must be What We Know…

24 Response to Intervention (RTI) is a way of screening children, early in their schooling, that can help schools and educators identify those who may not be responding to instruction – and thus may be at risk for school failure. The technique allows schools, on a schoolwide basis, to provide any student more intensive support–and monitor their progress—than typically available in every classroom. How…

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26 Students must know what is expected of them Behavior is learned Schools must provide safe, learning conducive and predictable environments We must teach students what positive behaviors look like What We Know…

27 How… By intentionally designing and redesigning resources to match student needs Ensuring that every leader is responsible for planning, implementing and evaluating Using academic and behavioral data to inform instructional/behavioral decisions Including educators, families and community members as part of effective problem-solving and instructional decision making Creating an empowering culture that maintains collective responsibility for every child’s success

28 All students achieving to high standards by being provided sufficient time and support All low performing students being provided focused instruction All teachers teaching students to high standards by being given the right conditions and assistance All teachers intervening in the learning process when there is an indication of a failure to learn All teachers focusing early intervention resources on the early years of schooling Leadership Compass, Fall 2006, National Association of Elementary School Principals What we wanted in KS…

29 An integrated intervention support system A focus on both academics and behavior The provision of interventions as early or whenever needed Multiple or tiered levels of support and intervention A continuum of increasingly intense research- based interventions Ongoing monitoring of the effectiveness of the interventions provided What we put in place in KS…

30 In Kansas, this includes RTI and EIS and much more--this is referred to as: MTSS

31 Real Test What does MTSS stand for? Middle Tennessee Scuba & Swim Military Training Service Support Main Traffic Signal System Multi-Tier System of Support Midwest Teen Sex Show

32 Real Test What does MTSS stand for? Middle Tennessee Scuba & Swim Military Training Service Support Main Traffic Signal System Multi-Tier System of Support Midwest Teen Sex Show

33 MTSS What is MTSS? A three-tiered approach with tier 3 as special education RTI in disguise A way to delay identifying students as in need of special education Special education initiative A systemic approach to helping all students learn

34 MTSS What is MTSS? A three-tiered approach with tier 3 as special education RTI in disguise A way to delay identifying students as in need of special education Special education initiative A systemic approach to helping all students learn

35 The big “BIG” idea of MTSS 1. Deciding what is important 1. Deciding what is important for students to know 2. Teaching what is important 2. Teaching what is important for students to know 3. Keeping track 3. Keeping track of how students are doing 4. Making changes 4. Making changes according to the results collected Dave Tilly, Heartland AEA; 2005

36 1. Focused on every child’s achievement and behavior 2. Individual child problem solving 3. Evidence-based practices for every child 4. High quality, differentiated 5. Screening 6. Progress monitoring 7. Data-based decision-making 8. Timely, informative, systemic What MTSS is…

37 FromTo Intentional design/ redesign of services and supports to match the needs of students. What help does each student need? PREVENTION! Having programs and people available. Which student needs help? Adapted from Dan Reschly, 2002 What MTSS is not…

38 So what conditions must exist for MTSS to be successful?

39 MTSS Framework Leadership Identified Teams Buy-In/Consensus Communication Professional Development Empowering Culture Professional Development Initial Training Support for Implementation Monitoring for Fidelity Providing ongoing Support Empowering Culture Involving all Staff Involving Parents Informing All

40 Assessment Screening Diagnostic Progress Monitoring Outcomes Curriculum Core Supplemental Intensive Instruction Core Supplemental Intensive MTSS Framework

41 All (Core) Core Curriculum Core Instruction Screening Assessment Some (Supplemental) Protocol Based Curriculum Protocol Based Instruction Diagnostic Assessment Progress Monitoring Assessment Problem Solving Teams Few (Intensive) Problem Solving Teams Intensive, Customized Supports MTSS Framework

42 Kansas: Multi-Tier System of Supports

43 More intense supplemental targeted skill interventions Customized interventions Frequent progress monitoring to guide intervention design Kansas Multi-Tier System of Support (MTSS) Student centered planning Customized function-based interventions Frequent progress monitoring to guide intervention design AcademicsBehavior KSDE - July 2007 Draft All students Evidence-based core curriculum & instruction Assessment system and data-based decision making All students, All settings Positive behavioral expectations explicitly taught and reinforced Consistent approach to discipline Assessment system and data-based decision making Supplemental targeted function-based interventions Small groups or individual support Frequent progress monitoring to guide intervention design Supplemental targeted skill interventions Small groups Frequent progress monitoring to guide intervention design

44 Supports for ALL (Core) Academics All students Evidence-based core curriculum & instruction Assessment system and data-based decision making Behavior All students, All settings Positive behavioral expectations explicitly taught and reinforced Consistent approach to discipline Assessment system and data-based decision making

45 Academics Supplemental targeted skill interventions Small groups Frequent progress monitoring to guide intervention design Behavior Supplemental targeted skill interventions Small groups Frequent progress monitoring to guide intervention design Supports for SOME (Supplemental)

46 Academics More intense supplemental targeted skill interventions Customized interventions Frequent progress monitoring to guide intervention design Behavior Student centered planning Customized function- based interventions Frequent progress monitoring to guide intervention design Supports for FEW (Intensive)

47 MTSS and SW-PBIS At the heart of both MTSS and SW-PBIS is systemic change aimed at positively impacting both social and academic competencies for all students. MTSS draws upon evidence and research-based practices, incorporating the SW-PBIS framework into the broader integrated MTSS approach.

48 Advantages of MTSS Provides instructional and behavioral assistance in a timely fashion (e.g., NOT a wait-to-fail model) Helps ensure a student’s poor academic performance is not due to poor instruction or inappropriate curriculum or problem behavior is not due to lack of expectations Informs teachers and improves behavior and/or instruction because data are collected and closely linked to interventions

49 MTSS What confounds MTSS? Providing timely instructional assistance Lacking fidelity of implementation (progress monitoring, limited research) Limiting the number of tiers Informing teachers and improving instruction because assessment data are collected and closely linked to interventions

50 MTSS What confounds MTSS? Providing timely instructional assistance Lacking fidelity of implementation (progress monitoring, limited research) Limiting the number of tiers Informing teachers and improving instruction because assessment data are collected and closely linked to interventions

51 An overarching framework that guides improvement processes and planning An integrated systemic approach that includes early identification and rapid response to the needs of all students The establishment of positive, proactive environments as the norm The creation of strong, resourceful, empowered districts, schools, and staff What Will Success Look Like?

52 So, Toto, how has MTSS worked in Kansas? Data from MTSS efforts in Kansas to date…

53 How Has MTSS Worked? Junction City, KS: 10 th largest Kansas district Military connected students = 44% Free/reduced lunch students = 38.9% ELL = 3% SPED = 13.3% Ethnic demographics White

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56 How Has MTSS Worked? Hillsboro Elementary and Middle, KS: Median size Kansas district 28% free/reduced lunch students 13% SPED Median income below state average

57 How Has MTSS Worked?

58 Hillsboro, KS: In 2003, Hillsboro found 28 students to be eligible for special education services In 2008, Hillsboro found 1 student to be eligible for special education services How Has MTSS Worked?

59 Number of Schools Implementing SWPBS Annually

60 Proportional Relationship of Referrals to Students All Students

61 Anecdotal Reports from Schools (Prior to Full SWIS Implementation) 60% reduction in Office Discipline Referrals (ODRs) at Lincoln Elementary, Parsons ( to ) 33% decrease in ODRs at Highland Park, Topeka 2,000 fewer ODRs at Salina Central High School during the first implementation year

62 Anecdotal & Empirical Reports from Schools Hocker Grove in Shawnee Mission report: Decreases in the intensity of problem behaviors Decreases in Out of School Suspensions and In School Suspensions Decreases in Office Discipline Referrals Westridge Middle School in Shawnee Mission report: Decreases intensity of problem behaviors Decreases in Out of School Suspensions and In School Suspensions Greater balance in ethnicity proportions for students receiving ODRs

63 Prior to PBSPBS Year 1 PBS Year 2

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65 Swimming Against the Trends

66 KS Education Shines! The American Legislative Exchange Council’s 2007 report card listed KS 7 th in the nation for its academic achievement KS students rank in the top 10% for reading and mathematics on the ACT 89.7% of students graduate 87.5% of teachers are highly qualified On the 2007 NAEP, KS: 4 th /8 th graders ranked 2 nd in the nation on math 4 th /8 th graders ranked 6 th on reading

67 % Tested CompAve.MathReadingScience Kansas76% Colorado100% Missouri74% Nebraska77% Oklahoma71% Texas30% News from ACT

68 Five Year Trend: Composite

69 Kansas: Reading

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71 Gap 35% Gap 25%

72 Kansas: Math

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74 Gap 38% Gap 22%

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77 Leaders and Laggards: A State-by-State Report Card on Educational Effectiveness Center for American Progress Certain states with a large percentage of low-income and minority students score far better than others on achievement tests. Those seeking to improve their own students' academic results should look to high-achieving states with large percentages of traditionally low-scoring demographic groups, such as Florida, Kansas, Texas, and Virginia, to figure out how to succeed with low-income and minority students. Because they are serving those students relatively well, they earned As in this category.

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80 In KS, We Promise All Students… You will acquire the same essential knowledge and skills as the other students Your learning will be carefully monitored, and you will be given multiple opportunities to demonstrate your learning You will promptly receive extra time and support if you experience difficulty in learning Your teachers will clarify the standards they will use in assessing the quality of your work You will be the beneficiaries of educators who have promised to work together collaboratively to use the practices that have a positive impact on your achievement

81 In Order to Ensure That a Thousand Years From Now… We have helped: --every 20 th child who drops out --every 10 th child who has multiple risk factors --every 8th child who is mentally or physically challenged --every 7th child who is Hispanic --every 6th child who is black --every 5th child who is poor --every child

82 Bonus Question What convention group has the most number of attendees falling into the water at the San Antonio River Walk?

83 Bonus Question What convention group has the most number of attendees falling into the water at the San Antonio River Walk? Librarians

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85 Moving Upstream: A Story of Prevention and Intervention

86 In a small town, a group of fishermen gathered down at the river. Not long after they got there, a child came floating down the rapids calling for help. One of the group on the shore quickly dived in and pulled the child out.

87 Minutes later another child came, then another, and then many more children were coming down the river. Soon everyone was diving in and dragging children to the shore, then jumping back in to save as many as they could.

88 In the midst of all this frenzy, one of the group was seen walking away. Her colleagues were irate. How could she leave when there were so many children to save? After long hours, to everyone’s relief, the flow of children stopped, and the group could finally catch their breath. At that moment, their colleague came back. They turned on her and angrily shouted: “HOW COULD YOU WALK OFF WHEN WE NEEDED EVERYONE HERE TO SAVE THE CHILDREN?”

89 She replied, It occurred to me that someone ought to go upstream and find out why so many kids were falling into the river. What I found is that the old wooden bridge had several planks missing, and when some children tried to jump over the gap, they couldn’t make it and fell through into the river. So I got someone to fix the bridge.

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94 Self-Correcting Feedback Loop

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96 What does it mean to us? “If a child doesn’t know how to read, we teach.” “If a child doesn’t know how to swim, we teach.” “If a child doesn’t know how to multiply, we teach.” “If a child doesn’t know how to drive, we teach.” “If a child doesn’t know how to behave, we... teach?... punish?” John Herner, Counterpoint (1998, p.2) Instead of

97 Responsibility “I’ve come to the frightening conclusion that I am the decisive element in the classroom. It’s my daily mood that makes the weather. As a teacher, I possess tremendous power to make a child’s life miserable or joyous. I can be a tool of torture or an instrument of inspiration. I can humiliate or humor, hurt or heal. In all situations, it is my response that decides whether a crisis will be escalated and a child humanized or dehumanized.” ~Dr. Haim Ginott


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