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Kansas-Nebraska Act Dred Scott Case Pages 492-493 Workbook 88.

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Presentation on theme: "Kansas-Nebraska Act Dred Scott Case Pages 492-493 Workbook 88."— Presentation transcript:

1 Kansas-Nebraska Act Dred Scott Case Pages Workbook 88

2 Kansas-Nebraska Act Congress changed the Missouri Compromise and passed the Kansas- Nebraska Act. Congress changed the Missouri Compromise and passed the Kansas- Nebraska Act. Under this new plan, slavery would not be allowed in the territories of Kansas and Nebraska. Under this new plan, slavery would not be allowed in the territories of Kansas and Nebraska. People living in those lands would decide the issue of slavery by voting. People living in those lands would decide the issue of slavery by voting.

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4 Bleeding Kansas Kansas quickly became the center of attention. Kansas quickly became the center of attention. People for and against slavery rushed to the territory, hoping to help decide the vote. People for and against slavery rushed to the territory, hoping to help decide the vote. Fighting broke out and more than 200 people were killed. Fighting broke out and more than 200 people were killed. Kansas was admitted as a free state. Kansas was admitted as a free state.

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6 Dred Scott Case Dred Scott was a slave who asked the Supreme Court to decide his freedom. Dred Scott was a slave who asked the Supreme Court to decide his freedom. Scott argued he should be free because he had once lived in a free land. Scott argued he should be free because he had once lived in a free land. He had lived in Illinois and Wisconsin with his owner. He had lived in Illinois and Wisconsin with his owner.

7 Chief Justice Roger Taney Chief Justice Roger Taney said that Scott had “none of the rights and privileges” of American citizens. Chief Justice Roger Taney said that Scott had “none of the rights and privileges” of American citizens. Dred Scott was a slave and living on a free land did not change that. Dred Scott was a slave and living on a free land did not change that. Chief Justice Taney also said that Congress had no right to outlaw slavery. Chief Justice Taney also said that Congress had no right to outlaw slavery.

8 Chief Justice Roger Taney He said the Constitution protects peoples’ rights to own property and slaves were property. He said the Constitution protects peoples’ rights to own property and slaves were property. The Missouri Compromise according to Taney was preventing people from owning property. The Missouri Compromise according to Taney was preventing people from owning property.

9 Dred Scott Case

10 The Supreme Court Roger Taney was born to a wealthy slave-owning family in Maryland. Roger Taney was born to a wealthy slave-owning family in Maryland. At the time of the Dred Scott Case, five of the nine justices were from the South. At the time of the Dred Scott Case, five of the nine justices were from the South. Taney hoped the decision of the Supreme Court would end the abolitionists movement. Taney hoped the decision of the Supreme Court would end the abolitionists movement.


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