Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

May 15, 2013. DRAFT Achievement Level Descriptors, Content Claims, and College and Career Readiness Definition – Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortia.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "May 15, 2013. DRAFT Achievement Level Descriptors, Content Claims, and College and Career Readiness Definition – Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortia."— Presentation transcript:

1 May 15, 2013

2 DRAFT Achievement Level Descriptors, Content Claims, and College and Career Readiness Definition – Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortia (SBAC)

3 SBAC Overall Claims - ELA Students can demonstrate progress toward college and career readiness in ELA/literacy. (Grades 3-5) Students can demonstrate college and career readiness in ELA/literacy. (Grade 11) Reading—Students can read closely and analytically to comprehend a range of increasingly complex literary and informational texts. Writing—Students can produce effective and well-grounded writing for a range of purposes and audiences. Speaking and Listening—Students can employ effective speaking and listening skills for a range of purposes and audiences. Research—Students can engage in research/inquiry to investigate topics and to analyze, integrate, and present information.

4 SBAC Overall Claims-Mathematics College/Career Readiness: Students can demonstrate progress toward college and career readiness in mathematics (overall claim for Grades 3-8) Students can demonstrate college and career readiness for mathematics (overall claim for Grade 11) Content Claims Concepts and Procedures – students can explain and apply mathematical concepts and interpret and carry out mathematical procedures with precision and fluency (content claim) Problem Solving – students can solve a range of complex, well-posed problems in pure and applied mathematics, making productive use of knowledge and problem solving strategies Communicating Reasoning – students can clearly and precisely construct viable arguments to support their own reasoning and to critique the reasoning of others Modeling and Data Analysis – students can analyze complex, real- world scenarios and construct and use mathematical models to interpret and solve problems

5 College content-readiness definition and policy framework -SBAC Students who perform at the College Content-Ready level in English language arts/literacy demonstrate subject-area knowledge and skills associated with readiness for entry-level, transferable, credit-bearing English and composition courses. These students also demonstrate reading, writing, listening, and research skills necessary for introductory courses in a variety of disciplines.

6 College content-readiness definition and policy framework - SBAC Students who perform at the College Content-Ready level in mathematics demonstrate subject-area knowledge and skills associated with readiness for entry-level, transferable, credit-bearing mathematics or statistics courses. These students also demonstrate quantitative reasoning skills necessary for introductory courses in a variety of disciplines.

7 SBAC - Achievement Level Descriptors Level 4: Demonstrates deep command of the knowledge and skills associated with college and career readiness Level 3: Demonstrates sufficient command of the knowledge and skills associated with college and career readiness Level 2: Demonstrates partial command of the knowledge and skills associated with college and career readiness Level 1: Demonstrates minimal command of the knowledge and skills associated with college and career readiness

8 Policy Framework-SBAC LevelPolicy ALDCollege Content Readiness Implications for Grade 12 and College Placement 4 Demonstrates deep command of the knowledge and skills associated with college and career readiness Student is exempt from development work States/districts/colleges may offer advanced courses (such as AP, IB, or dual enrollment for these students. Colleges may evaluate additional data, (courses completed, grades, placement test scores, etc.) to determine student placement in courses beyond an initial entry level course 3 Demonstrates sufficient command of the knowledge and skills associated with college and career readiness Student is exempt from development work, contingent on continued learning in Grade 12 Within each state, higher education, and K-12 officials determine appropriate evidence of continued learning (such as test scores or course grades). Colleges may evaluate additional data, (courses completed, grades, placement test scores, etc.) to determine student placement in courses beyond an initial entry level course

9 Policy Framework - SBAC LevelPolicy ALDCollege Content Readiness Implications for Grade 12 and College Placement 2 Demonstrates partial command of the knowledge and skills associated with college and career readiness Student needs support to meet college readiness standard States/districts/colleges may implement Grade 12 transition courses for these students. States may choose to retest these students near the conclusion of grade 12. Colleges may evaluate additional data, (courses completed, grades, placement test scores, etc.) to determine student placement in developmental or credit bearing courses. 1 Demonstrates deep command of the knowledge and skills associated with college and career readiness Student needs substantial support to meet college readiness standard States/districts/colleges may offer supplemental programs for these students. States may choose to retest these students near the conclusion of grade 12. Colleges may evaluate additional data, (courses completed, grades, placement test scores, etc.) to determine student placement in developmental or credit bearing courses.

10 Draft Performance Level Descriptors and College and Career Readiness Standards for ELA & Math – Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC)

11 College and Career Determination in English Language Arts/Literacy- PARCC Students who earn a College-and Career-Ready Determination in ELA/literacy will have demonstrated the academic knowledge, skills, and practices necessary to enter directly into and succeed in entry-level credit-bearing courses in College English Composition, Literature, and technical courses requiring college-level reading and writing.

12 College and Career Determination in MATHEMATICS - PARCC Students who earn a College-and Career-Ready Determination in mathematics will have demonstrated the academic knowledge, skills, and practices necessary to enter directly into and succeed in entry-level credit-bearing courses in College Algebra, Introductory College Statistics, and technical courses requiring an equivalent level of mathematics.

13 ELA/Literacy for Grades 3–11 “On Track” Master Claim/Reporting Category: Students are “on track” to college and career readiness in ELA/Literacy. Major Claim: Reading Complex Text Students read and comprehend a range of sufficiently complex texts independently. SC: Vocabulary Interpretation and Use (RL/RI.X.4 and L.X.4-6) Students use context to determine the meaning of words and phrases. SC: Reading Informational Text (RI.X.1-10) Students demonstrate comprehension and draw evidence from readings of grade- level, complex informational texts. SC: Reading Literature (RL.X.1-10) Students demonstrate comprehension and draw evidence from readings of grade- level, complex literary text. Major Claim: Writing Students write effectively when using and/or analyzing sources. SC: Written Expression (W.X.1-10) Students produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to the task, purpose, and audience. SC: Conventions and Knowledge of Language (L.X.1-3) Students demonstrate knowledge of conventions and other important elements of language. SC: Research (data taken from Research Simulation Task) Students build and present knowledge through integration, comparison, and synthesis of ideas

14 P ARCC Claims Driving Design in Mathematics 14 Sub-claim A: Students solve problems involving the major content* for their grade level with connections to practices Sub-Claim B: Students solve problems involving the additional and supporting content* for their grade level with connections to practices Sub-claim C: Students express mathematical reasoning by constructing mathematical arguments and critiques Sub-Claim D: Students solve real world problems engaging particularly in the modeling practice Sub-Claim E: Students demonstrate fluency in areas set forth in the Standards for Content in grades 3-6 Master Claim: Students are “on track” or ready for college and career *Major content and additional and supporting content for each grade level are outlined in the PARCC Model Content Frameworks, available at

15 Policy Level Performance Descriptors and General Content Claims - PARCC The policy-level PLDs and general content claims describe, in broad terms, the knowledge, skills, and practices, students performing at a given performance level are able to demonstrate. They also indicate, for specific performance levels, whether students might need additional support or are likely to be ready for the next grade level without additional support.

16 Performance Levels Performance levels (Level 1-5) Five performance levels – Intended to provide better information across the full range of student performance, particularly for low-performing students and high performing students Performance levels are numbered rather than named so that stakeholders focus on the knowledge, skills, and practices associated with a particular level, rather than on a label of students

17 The Five Performance Levels – Mathematics & ELA Level 5: Students performing at this level demonstrate a distinguished command of the knowledge, skills, and practices embodied by the Common Core State Standards assessed at their grade level. Level 4: Solid command… Level 3: Moderate command… Level 2: Partial command…. Level 1: Minimal command….

18 May 15, 2013

19 Next Generation Assessments Sample items released Rigor is evident Implication for professional development, classroom practices, and classroom observations performance-tasks/

20 PARCC English Language Arts Sample questions annotated with “Advances and Answer Choice Rationales” Emphasis on evidence-based answers– even with multiple choice, students cannot rely on prior knowledge Explanation of Alignment to Standards Alignment to PARCC Assessment Claims and Evidence Statements Scoring Points and Rationale

21 ELA, Grade 3, Reading Part A Question: What is one main idea of “How Animals Live?” a. There are many types of animals on the planet. b. Animals need water to live. c. There are many ways to sort different animals.* d. Animals begin their life cycles in different forms

22 ELA, Grade 3, continued Part B Question: Which sentence from the article best supports the answer to Part A? a. “Animals get oxygen from air or water." b. "Animals can be grouped by their traits."* c. "Worms are invertebrates." d. "All animals grow and change over time." e. "Almost all animals need water, food, oxygen, and shelter to live." Note: Students only get credit for Part B if Part A is answered correctly.

23 ELA, Grade 7, Writing Question: Based on the information in the text “Biography of Amelia Earhart,” write an essay that summarizes and explains the challenges Earhart faced throughout her life. Remember to use textual evidence to support your ideas.

24 ELA, Grade 10, Reading and Writing Question: Use what you have learned from reading “Daedalus and Icarus” by Ovid and “To a Friend Whose Work Has Come to Triumph” by Anne Sexton to write an essay that provides an analysis of how Sexton transforms Daedalus and Icarus. As a starting point, you may want to consider what is emphasized, absent, or different in the two texts, but feel free to develop your own focus for analysis. Develop your essay by providing textual evidence from both texts. Be sure to follow the conventions of standard English.

25 Implications for Instruction

26 SBAC English Language Arts Item type and alignment to SBAC claims Primary Targets Level of Difficulty Scoring Rubric Technology Enhanced Items Stimuli (i.e., passages, informational text, video clip, etc.) Performance Tasks Practice tests will be online, late May 2013

27 Sample Assessment Item, Gr 3 Speaking and Listening To tell how an astronaut needs sleep To describe how an astronaut floats in space To explain that an astronaut’s work is very difficult To show how an astronaut’s body lacks gravity to help it work

28 SBAC English Language Arts Reading Grade 4

29 SBAC English Language Arts Reading Grade 6

30 SBAC English Language Arts High School The following excerpt is from a writer’s first draft of a narrative essay. Read the excerpt. Then rewrite it, revising it to correct errors. I had no idea what to expect when I walked into the arena. There were people everywhere, most of them clad in brightly colored jersey’s with different players’ names on the back of them. There were some names I couldnt even pronounce. Me and my friend made our way to the corridor that led to the ice rink. The minute I stepped through the doorway, I could feel a rush of cold air hit my face. I could actually smell the ice! I never thought ice had a smell, but it really does. The next thing I noticed was the size, of the ice rink. There were lines and circles painted all over it, and I knew immediately I wouldn’t understand the rules. We found our seats, and it wasn’t long before the game started. We sat so close to the action that I felt as if I was right in the middle of it, the action was so intense it was hard to follow the puck, keep an eye on the players, and to figure out which team was ahead. When the home team scored a goal. The entire arena erupted with cheering that was so loud, I bet it was heard across town. by the end of the game, I felt so many emotions: delight, disappointment, fear, and excitement. Mostly, though, I felt in awe of the athletes who played this game. They are much more tougher than I ever expected. I suspect others new to hockey will be as impressed as me by this fast, interesting game. Now rewrite the excerpt, revising it to correct errors. Type your answer in the space provided.

31 Implications for Instruction

32 PARCC Mathematics Item type and alignment to PARCC Claims Most relevant Content Standard(s) Most relevant Mathematical Practice Standard(s) Item description and assessment qualities Scoring

33 Work on selected sample items representing Grades 3 to High School Mathematics. Discuss your solution(s) with a neighbor.

34 Mathematics, Grade 3 Fractions on the number line

35 Mathematics, Grade 3, Fluency

36 Mathematics, Grade 6, Slider Ruler

37 Mathematics, Grade 7, Speed

38 Math, High School, Functions

39 Prototype item from the Charles Dana Center

40 SBAC Mathematics Item type and alignment to SBAC claims Targets Difficulty Progression Scoring Rubric Technology Enhanced items Performance Tasks Practice tests will be online, late May 2013

41 SBAC Mathematics

42 Grade 5 – Culminating Fluencies Choose True or False for each item

43 Implications for Instruction What are the instruction implications for language development? How do we focus students’ attention on the language of mathematics with its academic vocabulary while providing multiple opportunities for students to participate in rich classroom discussions using rich tasks?


Download ppt "May 15, 2013. DRAFT Achievement Level Descriptors, Content Claims, and College and Career Readiness Definition – Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortia."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google