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COLLEGE TESTING EVERYTHING YOU WANT TO KNOW AND MORE!

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Presentation on theme: "COLLEGE TESTING EVERYTHING YOU WANT TO KNOW AND MORE!"— Presentation transcript:

1 COLLEGE TESTING EVERYTHING YOU WANT TO KNOW AND MORE!

2 AND YOUR CHOICES ARE… THE ACT THE SAT

3 WHAT ARE COLLEGE ADMISSIONS TESTS? National Standardized Tests National Standardized Tests A student's high school grades, activities, and course selection are the single best indicators of how well that student is going to do in college. But course content and grading standards vary widely among high schools, making it difficult for colleges to compare the academic records of their applicants. Testing English, Mathematics, Reading, and Science (ACT only) Testing English, Mathematics, Reading, and Science (ACT only) Private companies administer tests- ACT/SAT Private companies administer tests- ACT/SAT PSAT- pre SAT PSAT- pre SAT PLAN – pre ACT PLAN – pre ACT

4 WHEN SHOULD I TEST? Pick a test date that is at least two months ahead of the application deadlines of all the colleges and scholarship agencies you might want to apply to. Reports for the ACT (No Writing) are normally mailed within 3–8 weeks after the test date. If you take the ACT Plus Writing, reports will be mailed only after all of your scores are available, including Writing, normally within 5–8 weeks after the test date. Pick a test date that is at least two months ahead of the application deadlines of all the colleges and scholarship agencies you might want to apply to. Reports for the ACT (No Writing) are normally mailed within 3–8 weeks after the test date. If you take the ACT Plus Writing, reports will be mailed only after all of your scores are available, including Writing, normally within 5–8 weeks after the test date. ADVANTAGES TO TESTING IN YOUR JUNIOR YEAR: You've probably completed the coursework corresponding to the test material. You've probably completed the coursework corresponding to the test material. You'll have your test scores and other information in time to help you plan your senior year. (For example, you may decide to take an additional class in an area in which your test score was low.) You'll have your test scores and other information in time to help you plan your senior year. (For example, you may decide to take an additional class in an area in which your test score was low.) Colleges will know of your interests and have your scores in time to contact you during the summer before your senior year, when many of them are sending information about admissions, course placement, scholarships, and special programs to prospective students. Colleges will know of your interests and have your scores in time to contact you during the summer before your senior year, when many of them are sending information about admissions, course placement, scholarships, and special programs to prospective students. You'll have information about yourself and the schools you're considering prior to your campus visits, making your visits more focused. You'll have information about yourself and the schools you're considering prior to your campus visits, making your visits more focused. You'll have the opportunity to retest if you feel your scores don't accurately reflect your ability. You'll have the opportunity to retest if you feel your scores don't accurately reflect your ability.

5 WHICH TEST SHOULD I TAKE?  Colleges will accept either test  ACT offered at NUHS  SAT must be taken in Auburn, Rocklin, Chico, etc  If possible take both tests-may do better on one then the other

6 HOW IMPORTANT ARE THE TEST IN COLLEGE ADMISSIONS? #1 factor in determining eligibility for college is grades and rigor of academic case load #2 factor is ACT/SAT test scores!

7 TESTING TIMELINE SOPHOMORE YEAR  PLAN  PSAT (not required)

8 JUNIOR YEAR Take PSAT in October Take SAT or ACT in the spring Take SAT II (subject tests) in June if possible. Need two Subject tests for the UC’s and most private colleges!

9 SENIOR YEAR  Re-take SAT/ACT and or Subject test in the fall  Make sure to look at deadlines for colleges you are applying for. Most are December but Cal Poly and some privates are sooner.

10 THE ACT What is the ACT? The ACT is a national college admissions examination that consists of four multiple-choice subject area tests in: English, Mathematics, Reading, and Science. The ACT Plus Writing includes the four multiple-choice tests and a Writing test. The test includes 215 multiple-choice questions and takes approximately 3 hours and 30 minutes to complete, including a short break (or just over four hours if you are taking the ACT Plus Writing). Actual testing time is 2 hours and 55 minutes (plus 30 minutes if you are taking the ACT Plus Writing).

11 Test Content English English English 75 questions 45 minutes Measures standard written English and rhetorical skills. Mathematics Mathematics Mathematics 60 questions 60 minutes Measures mathematical skills students have typically acquired in courses taken up to the beginning of grade 12. Reading Reading Reading 40 questions 35 minutes Measures reading comprehension. Science Science Science 40 questions 35 minutes Measures the interpretation, analysis, evaluation, reasoning, and problem- solving skills required in the natural sciences. Optional Writing Test Optional Writing Test Optional Writing Test Optional Writing Test 1 prompt 30 minutes Measures writing skills emphasized in high school English classes and in entry- level college composition courses.

12 TEST DESCRIPTIONS ENGLISH The English test is a 75-question, 45-minute test, covering: The English test is a 75-question, 45-minute test, covering: Usage/mechanics Usage/mechanics Punctuation Punctuation Grammar and usage Grammar and usage Sentence structure Sentence structure Rhetorical skills Rhetorical skills Strategy Strategy Organization Organization Style Style Spelling, vocabulary, and rote recall of rules of grammar aren't tested. Spelling, vocabulary, and rote recall of rules of grammar aren't tested. The test consists of five prose passages, each one accompanied by multiple-choice test questions. Different passage types are included to provide variety. The test consists of five prose passages, each one accompanied by multiple-choice test questions. Different passage types are included to provide variety.

13 READING The Reading Test is a 40-question, 35-minute test that measures your reading comprehension. You're asked to read four passages & answer questions that show your understanding of: What is directly stated What is directly stated Statements with implied meanings Statements with implied meanings Specifically, questions will ask you to use referring and reasoning skills to: Specifically, questions will ask you to use referring and reasoning skills to: Determine main ideas Determine main ideas Locate and interpret significant details Locate and interpret significant details Understand sequences of events Understand sequences of events Make comparisons Make comparisons Comprehend cause-effect relationships Comprehend cause-effect relationships Draw generalizations Draw generalizations Determine the meaning of context-dependent words, phrases, and statements Determine the meaning of context-dependent words, phrases, and statements Analyze the author's or narrator's voice and method Analyze the author's or narrator's voice and method

14 MATHEMATICS The ACT Mathematics Test is a 60-question, 60-minute test designed to measure the mathematical skills students have typically acquired in courses taken by the end of 11th grade. The test presents multiple-choice questions that require you to use reasoning skills to solve practical problems in mathematics. You need knowledge of basic formulas and computational skills to answer the problems, but you aren't required to know complex formulas and perform extensive computation. You may use a calculator on the Mathematics Test. See ACT's calculator policy for details about permitted and prohibited calculators. If you use a prohibited calculator, you will be dismissed and your answer document will not be scored. You are not required to use a calculator. All of the problems can be solved without a calculator. ACT's calculator policy ACT's calculator policy

15 SCIENCE The Science Test is a 40-question, 35-minute test that measures the skills required in the natural sciences: interpretation, analysis, evaluation, reasoning, and problem solving. The Science Test is a 40-question, 35-minute test that measures the skills required in the natural sciences: interpretation, analysis, evaluation, reasoning, and problem solving. You are NOT permitted to use a calculator on the Science Test. You are NOT permitted to use a calculator on the Science Test. The test assumes that students are in the process of taking the core science course of study (three years or more) that will prepare them for college-level work and have completed a course in Earth science and/or physical science and a course in biology. The test assumes that students are in the process of taking the core science course of study (three years or more) that will prepare them for college-level work and have completed a course in Earth science and/or physical science and a course in biology.

16 WRITING The Writing Test is a 30-minute essay test that measures your writing skills—specifically those writing skills emphasized in high school English classes and in entry-level college composition courses. The test consists of one writing prompt that will define an issue and describe two points of view on that issue. You are asked to respond to a question about your position on the issue described in the writing prompt. In doing so, you may adopt one or the other of the perspectives described in the prompt, or you may present a different point of view on the issue. Your score will not be affected by the point of view you take on the issue

17 2008 – 2009 ACT Test Dates September 13, 2008*August 12, 2008 August 13 – 22, 2008 October 25, 2008September 19, 2008Sept. 20 – Oct. 3, 2008 December 13, 2008November 7, 2008November 8 – 20, 2008 February 7, 2009**January 6, 2009 January 7 – 16, 2009 April 4, 2009February 27, 2009Feb.28 – Mar. 13, 2009 June 13, 2009May 8, 2009May 9 – 22, 2009 The ACT is administered on five test dates—in October, December, February, April, and June. In selected states, the ACT is also offered in September. In the United States, U.S. Territories, Puerto Rico, and Canada: Test DateRegistration Deadline (Late Fee Required)

18 PREPARING FOR THE ACT RESOURCES ONLINE AT www.ACT.ORG RESOURCES ONLINE AT www.ACT.ORGwww.ACT.ORG ACT Online Prep™ The only test preparation program designed exclusively by ACT test development professionals is now online! ACT Online Prep™ The only test preparation program designed exclusively by ACT test development professionals is now online! ACT Online Prep ACT Online Prep The Real ACT Prep Guide The official ACT prep guide—the only one that includes three actual retired ACT tests—each with an optional Writing Test. The Real ACT Prep Guide The official ACT prep guide—the only one that includes three actual retired ACT tests—each with an optional Writing Test. The Real ACT Prep Guide The Real ACT Prep Guide Preparing for the ACT A free student preparation booklet available from most high schools and colleges—includes test information, complete practice tests with scoring keys, and a writing prompt with sample essays. Preparing for the ACT A free student preparation booklet available from most high schools and colleges—includes test information, complete practice tests with scoring keys, and a writing prompt with sample essays. Preparing for the ACT Preparing for the ACT

19 THE SAT The SAT helps college admissions officers make fair and informed admissions decisions. Combined with a student's academic record, it is a proven, reliable indicator of college success. Since its launch in 1926, the SAT has helped millions of students connect with college success and today remains the most reliable, effective measure of a student's college readiness. The SAT tests the subject matter learned by students in high school and how well they apply that knowledge—the critical thinking skills necessary to succeed in college.

20 SAT FACTS The SAT is offered seven times a year in the US & six times at international sites.seven times Takes three hours and 45 minutes Consists of 10 separately timed sections:  Three sections test critical reading (70 minutes total)  Three sections test mathematics (70 minutes total)  Three sections test writing (60 minutes total)  One variable (unscored) section tests critical reading, mathematics, or writing (25 minutes total) Assesses critical thinking and problem solving skills in three areas:three areas  Critical reading  Mathematics  Writing Includes three kinds of questions:  Multiple-choice questions  Student-produced responses (mathematics only) Student-produced responses  Essay question Essay Is machine-scored, except for the essaymachine-scored

21 WHY THE SAT? SAT fufills the writing assessment required by many schools for admission SAT fufills the writing assessment required by many schools for admission Many institutions require a writing assessment for admission. The SAT automatically fulfills this requirement. Many institutions require a writing assessment for admission. The SAT automatically fulfills this requirement. require a writing assessmentrequire a writing assessment HOW DIFFICULT IS THE SAT? The SAT is developed to reflect accepted educational standards. Data shows that the material on the SAT & the time allocated to each section are appropriate for the intended test-taking population: The SAT is developed to reflect accepted educational standards. Data shows that the material on the SAT & the time allocated to each section are appropriate for the intended test-taking population: On average, students answer 50 to 60% of questions correctly. On average, students answer 50 to 60% of questions correctly. 80% finish nearly the entire test. 80% finish nearly the entire test. Almost all students complete at least 75% of the questions. Almost all students complete at least 75% of the questions.

22 CRITICAL READING & SENTENCE-LEVEL READING  70 min. (two 25-min. sections and one 20- min. section) Tests reading comprehension, sentence completions, and paragraph- length critical reading (200-800)  The critical reading section, formerly known as the verbal section, includes short as well as long reading passages.  Questions can be based on one, or sometimes two, reading passages. Some questions are not based on reading passages, but ask you to complete sentences.

23 The Writing Section 60 minutes Grammar, usage, and word choice Multiple choice questions (35 min.) and student-written essay (25 min.)(200-800) The writing section includes both multiple- choice questions and a direct writing measure in the form of an essay.

24 The Mathematics Section 70 min. (two 25-min. sections and one 20-min. section) 70 min. (two 25-min. sections and one 20-min. section) Number and operations; algebra and functions; geometry; statistics, probability, and data analysis Number and operations; algebra and functions; geometry; statistics, probability, and data analysis Five-choice multiple-choice questions and student- produced responses (200-800) Five-choice multiple-choice questions and student- produced responses (200-800) The SAT includes mathematics topics from up through a third-year college preparatory course, such as exponential growth, absolute value, and functional notation. It also places emphasis on such topics as linear functions, manipulations with exponents, and properties of tangent lines. The SAT includes mathematics topics from up through a third-year college preparatory course, such as exponential growth, absolute value, and functional notation. It also places emphasis on such topics as linear functions, manipulations with exponents, and properties of tangent lines. Important skills such as estimation and number sense are measured through the multiple-choice and student response (grid-in) questions. Important skills such as estimation and number sense are measured through the multiple-choice and student response (grid-in) questions.

25 PREPARING FOR THE SAT The SAT Preparation Center™The SAT Preparation Center™ offers: The SAT Preparation Center™ Sample questions Sample questions Answer explanations Answer explanations Official SAT practice test Official SAT practice test Personalized score report Personalized score report

26 SAT SUBJECT TESTS HELP COLLEGES OBJECTIVELY ASSESS STUDENT KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS SAT Subject Tests provide a reliable, objective assessment of student readiness for college-level work. Designed to measure student knowledge and skills in five major subject areas, the tests assess student ability to apply that knowledge—independent of any particular textbook or method of instruction. Students take the SAT Subject Tests to demonstrate to colleges their mastery of specific subjects such as English, history, mathematics, science, and foreign languages. The content of each test is not based on any one approach or curriculum but rather evolves to reflect current trends in high school course work. THE SUBJECT TESTS ARE A USEFUL PART OF THE COLLEGE APPLICATION PROCESS BECAUSE: They are highly reliable & valid A recognized, accurate measure of college readiness and subject- area knowledge A proven method for placing and advising students based on their individual academic preparation A way for students to show their thorough knowledge of a certain subject, as well as their academic interest and determination to succeed

27 SAT SUBJECT TESTS FACTS The SAT Subject Tests are offered six times a year in the United States and at international sites. The SAT Subject Tests are offered six times a year in the United States and at international sites.six timessix times Students can take one, two, or three tests on a single test date. Students can take one, two, or three tests on a single test date. Each takes one hour. Each takes one hour. All Subject Tests consist of multiple-choice questions, but some have unique features or formats. All Subject Tests consist of multiple-choice questions, but some have unique features or formats. The types of questions change little from year to year. The types of questions change little from year to year. All Subject Tests are machine scored. All Subject Tests are machine scored.machine scoredmachine scored

28 Five general subject areas, 20 Subject Tests that fall into general subject areas. Languages Languages Chinese with Listening Chinese with Listening French French French with Listening French with Listening German German German with Listening German with Listening Modern Hebrew Modern Hebrew Italian Italian Latin Latin Spanish Spanish Spanish with Listening Spanish with Listening Japanese with Listening Japanese with Listening Korean with Listening Korean with Listening History and Social Studies History and Social Studies United States History United States History World History World History Mathematics Mathematics Mathematics Level 1 Mathematics Level 1 Mathematics Level 2 Mathematics Level 2 English English Literature Literature Science Science Biology E/M Biology E/M Chemistry Chemistry Physics Physics

29 2008-09 SAT FEES SAT Reasoning Test™$45 SAT Subject Tests Basic registration fee$20 Language Tests with Listening (add to basic reg. fee)add $20 All other Subject Tests (add per test to basic reg. fee)add $9 Additional Processing Fees (add to test fees) Register by phone (available only if you have registered before)$12.50 Change fee (test type, center, or date change)$22 Late fee$23 Standby fee$38 Fees for Receiving Your Scores Early scores by WebFree, Official score report (automatically mailed after you test) Free, Scores by phone (fee per call)$12.50, Fees for Sending Your Scores; Score report requests at registration*4 reports included Each additional score report request*$9.50, Rush reporting service $27 plus $9.50 for each report Order additional reports by phone service$10 plus $9.50 for each report Retrieval fee for archived scores (additional fees may apply)$21Answer Services Fees, SAT Question-and-Answer Service (QAS)**$18SAT Student Answer Service (SAS)**$12, Additional Services Fees, Multiple-choice score verification$50†Essay score verification$50†Refund processing fee (for overpayments and duplicate payments) $7*, Students can select the four score report requests included in the registration up until 11:59 p.m. on the Monday nine days after the published test date. Score reports selected after that are subject to the regular score report fee. **Fees are nonrefundable, except those noted with a double asterisk. You must have missed your test date to receive a refund for these services. Orders cannot be refunded, returned, or canceled after shipment..

30 SAT TEST DATES & DEADLINES U.S. registration dates and deadlines 2008-09 Test Dates Test U.S. Registration Deadlines Regular Late (a fee applies) October 4, 2008* SAT & Subject Tests September 9, 2008September 16, 2008 November 1, 2008 SAT & Subject Tests September 26, 2008 October 10, 2008 December 6, 2008 SAT & Subject Tests November 5, 2008November 18, 2008 January 24, 2009 SAT & Subject Tests December 26, 2008January 6, 2009 March 14, 2009SAT onlyFebruary 10, 2009February 24, 2009 May 2, 2009 SAT & Subject Tests March 31, 2009April 9, 2009 June 6, 2009 SAT & Subject Tests May 5, 2009May 15, 2009

31 WHICH TEST SHOULD I TAKE? Colleges will accept either test Colleges will accept either test ACT offered at NUHS ACT offered at NUHS SAT must be taken in Auburn, Rocklin, Chico, etc SAT must be taken in Auburn, Rocklin, Chico, etc If possible take both tests-may do better on one then the other If possible take both tests-may do better on one then the other

32 SHOULD I TEST AGAIN? ► You should definitely consider retesting if you had any problems during testing, such as misunderstanding the directions, running out of time, or not feeling well. Many students test twice, once as a junior and again as a senior. ► You may also want to consider retesting if you don't believe that your scores accurately represent your abilities, especially if you see a discrepancy between your ACT scores and your high school grades, or if you have completed coursework or an intensive review in the subject areas included in the ACT since you tested. HOW WILL YOU DO ON A RETEST? ► Research shows that of the students who took the ACT more than once: ► 55% increased their Composite score on the retest ► 22% had no change in their Composite score on the retest ► 23% decreased their Composite score on the retest ► If you test more than once, you control which set of scores are sent to colleges or scholarship programs. which set of scores are sentwhich set of scores are sent

33 TEST DAY TIPS ADVANCE PLANNING Remember the importance of being organized and well rested on test day. You should to plan in advance to:  Organize ID, Admission Ticket, pencils, calculators, and other supplies  Get a good night's sleep  Eat breakfast  Double-check for everything they need before leaving home  Arrive early, by 7:45 a.m., at the test center WHAT TO BRING You should group together everything you must bring for the test beforehand. You must bring:  Admission Ticket  Admission Ticket Admission Ticket Admission Ticket  Acceptable photo ID (international restrictions may apply) Acceptable photo ID Acceptable photo ID  Two No. 2 pencils and a good eraser; no pens or mechanical pencils  Acceptable calculator with fresh batteries; you are not required to clear the memory on your calculator Acceptable calculator Acceptable calculator

34 OTHER GOOD IDEAS: Snacks (to eat during breaks) A watch (without an audible alarm) A backpack or bag (to be kept under the seat to store snacks in) Extra batteries Bring items that are in good working order Use a No. 2 pencil only because: Essays written in pen cannot be scanned and receive a score of 0 Essays written in pen cannot be scanned and receive a score of 0 Mechanical pencils might punch through the answer sheet and the marks you make cannot be guaranteed to scan properly Mechanical pencils might punch through the answer sheet and the marks you make cannot be guaranteed to scan properly Use equipment with which you are familiar Time yourself with a watch WHAT NOT TO BRING The following items are not permitted in the test room: Cell phone, pager, personal digital assistant, iPod, MP3 player, and any other digital or electronic equipment. Scratch paper, notes, books, dictionary Compass, protractor, ruler, or any other aid Highlighter or colored pencils Portable listening or recording device Camera or other photographic equipment Timer or watch with audible alarm You are not permitted to use a cell phone during the breaks. Leave your cell phones at home. Once the testing room supervisor has read the instructions to turn off & put away all prohibited devices, if a device rings or makes noise, or you are seen using a prohibited device, you may be dismissed, and your test scores may be canceled.

35 RESOURCES www.collegeboard.com www.collegeboard.com www.collegeboard.com www.act.org www.act.org www.act.org www.sierracollege.edu www.sierracollege.edu www.sierracollege.edu Teachers Teachers www.petersons.com www.petersons.com www.petersons.com Local private providers Local private providers


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