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1 Live, as if you were to die tomorrow. Learn, as if you were to live forever. Gandhi.

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Presentation on theme: "1 Live, as if you were to die tomorrow. Learn, as if you were to live forever. Gandhi."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Live, as if you were to die tomorrow. Learn, as if you were to live forever. Gandhi

2 2 © International Center for Leadership in Education Dr. Kathy Weigel Senior Consultant Time on Target Focus on Small Learning Communities through Rigor, Relevance, and Relationships Time on Target Focus on Small Learning Communities through Rigor, Relevance, and Relationships Dr. Dick Jones Senior Consultant

3 3 Day Overview Interdisciplinary Grading Student Engagement Student Habits Personalization Strategies Resources D- Moments 3

4 Interdisciplinary

5 5 Interdisciplinary Lesson Activity International Center for Leadership in Education

6 Landscape Planter Project A project we plan to have students undertake is to build a landscape planting on an area of schools grounds.

7 Landscape Planter Project 1.ProceduresSketch Planter to Desired ShapeDetermine Materials RequiredDetermine Location, Shape and Center Point of Planter Prepare Planter Area Cut Materials and Construct Install PVC Pipe and Sprinkler System Fill The Planter Plant Bedding Flowers

8 Grading

9 9 " Never doubt that a small group of citizens can change the world. Indeed it is the only thing that ever has.” 1 "Anyone can confirm how little the grading that results from examinations corresponds to the final useful work of people in life." Jean Piaget

10 10 Creating a Grading Scheme Activity International Center for Leadership in Education page 40

11 Concepts to Concrete: The Practitioner’s Guide to Transforming a High School Atlantic Community High School Delray Beach, Florida What Is A Grade?

12 Paradigm A PARADIGM is a basic belief or assumption; something you believe to be true. A PARADIGM SHIFT is a new way about how we approach problems; a new way of thinking.

13 “The significant problems we face cannot be solved by the same level of thinking that created them.” Albert Einstein

14 ACHS Vision The Academy Model Atlantic Community High School Delray Beach FL Graduation Continuing Education Meaningful Employment

15 Philosophical Underpinnings Theory - Reality Dr. Daggett Dr. Daggett Rigor Rigor Relevance Relevance Relationships Relationships Reflection Reflection OperationalReality Atlantic HS Stiggins – Assessments of and for learning Stiggins – Assessments of and for learning Dufour – Small Learning Communities Dufour – Small Learning Communities Howard – Data Feedback Strategy/Efficacy Howard – Data Feedback Strategy/Efficacy Single School Culture Dr. Allison Adler, Safe School Institute Palm Beach County Schools Atlantic Community High School Delray Beach FL

16 ICLE Philosophy  Know  Be Able to Do  Be Like t Rigor t Relevance t Relationships t Reflection What is a grade and how is it influenced by Rigor, Relevance, Relationships, and Reflection?

17 A,B,C,I,F Rigor and Relevance Influence – Grades – State Standards

18 Building Blocks for Success A, B, C, I, F A, B, C, I, F I Contracts I Contracts Honors Contract Honors Contract Proficiency vs. Seat Time Proficiency vs. Seat Time –Homework –Tutorials Atlantic Community High School Delray Beach FL Values

19 19 What is a grade? How confident are you that the grades the students receive in your classroom are: How confident are you that the grades the students receive in your classroom are: –Consistent? –An accurate measure of student proficiency? –Meaningful to both students and parents? –Supportive of the learning environment?

20 What does a grade mean to: A Student A Student A Parent A Parent A Teacher A Teacher A Principal A Principal

21 What is a grade and what does it mean? I got a “C”, what does that mean? I got a “C”, what does that mean? Does it mean: Does it mean: –I am smart but just lazy? –I am a little slow but worked real hard? –I am smart, worked hard, but did not have all the skills I needed to achieve mastery? –I was quiet, cute, or not a trouble maker? –I think a “C” is good enough !

22 What is a grade? Scenario 1 A student completes all of his homework assignments, A student completes all of his homework assignments, Student tries hard in class Student tries hard in class Student is not a problem Student is not a problem Student receives an average score of 50% on his exams… Student receives an average score of 50% on his exams… –What is his grade? –Should he move on to the next level?

23 What is a grade? Scenario 2 A student never completes homework assignments, A student never completes homework assignments, Student sleeps in class Student sleeps in class Student is frequently disruptive Student is frequently disruptive Student is often tardy or absent Student is often tardy or absent Student receives an average score of 95% on his exams… Student receives an average score of 95% on his exams… –What is his grade? –Should he move on to the next level?

24 What is a grade? Scenario 3 What do you say to a parent of a student that receives an “A” in your class but can’t pass FCAT (Florida’s high stakes test required for graduation) ? What do you say to a parent of a student that receives an “A” in your class but can’t pass FCAT (Florida’s high stakes test required for graduation) ?

25 What is a grade? Scenario 4 Does a letter grade tell a parent what their student has learned? Does a letter grade tell a parent what their student has learned?

26 What is a grade? Scenario 5 You teach your guts out… and the students’ results for the first test are: You teach your guts out… and the students’ results for the first test are: –1 “C” –1 “D” –20 “F”s. What now? What now?

27 What is a grade? Do grades motivate a student? How do grades: How do grades: –Impact student motivation –Predict future success –Make a child feel about himself

28 28 Why do we want to change current grading practices? Grades do not effectively communicate student proficiency in subject matter to parents or students. Grades do not effectively communicate student proficiency in subject matter to parents or students. Grades are an inconsistent measure of student knowledge and understanding. Grades are an inconsistent measure of student knowledge and understanding. Grades do not often foster a supportive learning environment Grades do not often foster a supportive learning environment

29 29 Defining Proficiency The student demonstrates mastery of the essential skills and key concepts. The student demonstrates mastery of the essential skills and key concepts. Mastery of skills; not mastery of content. Mastery of skills; not mastery of content.

30 30 Proficiency is not…… Extra work in a packet Extra work in a packet Missed work in a packet Missed work in a packet Extra seat time Extra seat time Grades for homework completion Grades for homework completion Grades for class work completion Grades for class work completion

31 31 Defining terminology Mark/score - the number or letter given to any student test or performance. Mark/score - the number or letter given to any student test or performance. Grade - the number or letter reported at the end of the nine weeks period of time as a summary statement of student performance and proficiency in the subject matter. Grade - the number or letter reported at the end of the nine weeks period of time as a summary statement of student performance and proficiency in the subject matter.

32 32 Defining A - B - C - I - F A - B - C - I - F only applies to the grades assigned to student performance at the end of a nine weeks marking period. A - B - C - I - F only applies to the grades assigned to student performance at the end of a nine weeks marking period. Students earning 70% % or less than 60% will receive the grade earned as reflected in the Palm Beach County Grading Scale. Students earning 70% % or less than 60% will receive the grade earned as reflected in the Palm Beach County Grading Scale.

33 33 What is an “I”? Grade assigned to students at the end of the nine weeks marking period if their cumulative average falls between 60-69%. Grade assigned to students at the end of the nine weeks marking period if their cumulative average falls between 60-69%. Students are given task(s) to demonstrate their understanding of the skills taught within the marking period. Students are given task(s) to demonstrate their understanding of the skills taught within the marking period. If the student demonstrates proficiency of the skills taught through the task(s), then the student earns an appropriate grade as determined by the teacher ( A - B - C). If the student demonstrates proficiency of the skills taught through the task(s), then the student earns an appropriate grade as determined by the teacher ( A - B - C).

34 34 “I” Contract Tasks Are organized and graded by concept. Are organized and graded by concept. Serve as the last retest opportunity for skills/concepts not yet mastered. Serve as the last retest opportunity for skills/concepts not yet mastered. determine the student’s level of proficiency as reflected in the score/mark and are used by the teacher to determine the grade earned for the nine weeks period. determine the student’s level of proficiency as reflected in the score/mark and are used by the teacher to determine the grade earned for the nine weeks period.

35 The 80% Rule / “I” Contract All scores of 80% or less are entered as an “I” until students show mastery on a retest All scores of 80% or less are entered as an “I” until students show mastery on a retest Re-teaching and extra help are provided Re-teaching and extra help are provided Students take retests on each concept not mastered Students take retests on each concept not mastered –One retest given in class –One more retest is taken after school All scores of less than 70% are entered as an “I” until students show mastery on a retest All scores of less than 70% are entered as an “I” until students show mastery on a retest “I on the Fly”, re-teach, re-test, ASAP “I on the Fly”, re-teach, re-test, ASAP 80% Rule Canaday I Contract ACHS

36 The 80% Rule / Considerations Retest scores of 80% or higher are placed in the grade book as an 80% (replacing the I) Retest scores of 80% or higher are placed in the grade book as an 80% (replacing the I) –Why only 80%, why not the highest grade earned (assumes retests are quality assessments) After retests are exhausted, the score from the most recent retest goes into the grade book After retests are exhausted, the score from the most recent retest goes into the grade book –Why not the highest score (builds efficacy/promotes effort) Dr. Robert Lynn Canady

37 Practices that inhibit learning Grading first efforts Grading first efforts Inconsistent grading scales Inconsistent grading scales Inconsistent grading criteria Inconsistent grading criteria Zero grades without further makeup opportunities Zero grades without further makeup opportunities Preconceptions about student abilities Preconceptions about student abilities Grade based on behavior, attendance and effort Grade based on behavior, attendance and effort Using grades for rewards or punishment Using grades for rewards or punishment Seat time vs. proficiency Seat time vs. proficiency Dr. Robert Lynn Canady

38 The zero... ZeroMinimumMake-up Dr. Robert Lynn Canady

39 Guideline # 1 Individual achievement as the basis for grades Not based upon group grades Not based upon group grades Not based on upon factors other than achievement of stated course goals Not based on upon factors other than achievement of stated course goals It’s your performance that counts It’s your performance that counts Dr. Robert Lynn Canady

40 Guideline # 2 These should not be included in a grade Effort Effort Participation Participation Attitude Attitude Behavior Behavior Homework Homework “That is a different grade.” Dr. Robert Lynn Canady

41 Guideline # 3 Relate grading procedures to learning goals Identify critical concepts/skills Identify critical concepts/skills Assess individual concepts /skills Assess individual concepts /skills Demonstrating mastery is the standard Demonstrating mastery is the standard Dr. Robert Lynn Canady Understand the difference between assessments “for” and “of” learning Understand the difference between assessments “for” and “of” learning Do not hold assessments of learning against students Do not hold assessments of learning against students Teach – Assess – Re-teach – Reassess Teach – Assess – Re-teach – Reassess

42 Who do you want to pack your Parachute? % Go/ No Go %Go/No/Go Bob Ted What is a grade ? Test 1 Test 2 Test 3 Test 4 Average

43 What is a grade? In any Common Course of Study Critical content Critical content –Key Vocabulary –Essential Understanding/Key concepts What do students need to know? What do students need to know? –Essential Skills and Processes What do students need to do? What do students need to do? –Required Assessments % No Go %Go Dr. Robert Lynn Canady

44 Assessments Group Questions by Concept Group Questions by Concept Separate scores for each Concept Separate scores for each Concept Provide more than one opportunity/mode for students to demonstrate mastery Provide more than one opportunity/mode for students to demonstrate mastery PortfolioRubrics Oral Exams Written Exam Hands on D Quadrant Projects Learning Styles Essay

45 Grading Strategy Practice Test (Assessment “for” learning) Dr. Stiggins Practice Test (Assessment “for” learning) Dr. Stiggins Re-teach as required Re-teach as required Assessment "of” learning Dr. Stiggins Assessment "of” learning Dr. Stiggins Only scores of 80% or higher initially entered into the grade book Dr. Canady Only scores of 80% or higher initially entered into the grade book Dr. Canady “I on the fly” ACHS is 70% “I on the fly” ACHS is 70%

46 46 RI G O R RELEVANCE A B D C Rigor/Relevance Framework RightAnswer Did Students Get it Right? RationalAnswerRightQuestions RightProcedure High Low 46

47 47 KNOWLEDGEKNOWLEDGE A P P L I C A T I O N Extended Response Product Performance Primary Assessments Rigor/Relevance Framework Portfolio Product Performance Interview Self Reflection Process Performance Product Performance Multiple Choice Constructed Response

48 48 Good Grading Practices Grades should be based on individual proficiency not group work Use separate systems for grading behavior Use incomplete rather than zeros Use systems that reflect the highest level of learning Move toward more performance assessments Use a proficiency scale rather than percentages 48

49 Engaging Students

50 50 Domains of Engagement CognitiveBeliefs BehavioralBehaviors EmotionalFeelings STUDENT ENGAGEMENT

51 51 Student Engagement Creating a Culture of Academic Achievement To learn more, order or view excerpt: Culture to Support Academics series Make engagement a data-driven process Develop engagement-based teaching and learning CD with professional development activities plus DVD

52 52

53 53 Solve this pictogram

54 54 Solve this pictogram

55 55 Solve this pictogram

56 56 Elements of Student Engagement

57 57 Engagement-based Learning and Teaching Pre-Conditions Relationships Relationships Environment Environment Guiding Principles Guiding Principles Rewards/Grading System Rewards/Grading System Student Habits Student Habits Foundation Skills Foundation Skills Pedagogy Design for RR Design for RR Active Learning Strategies Active Learning Strategies Personalized Personalized Literacy-focus Literacy-focus

58 58 Student Habits

59 59 Student Habits Power Teaching HS Video

60 60 Student Habits

61 61 Student Habits Routines for entering/leaving schoolRoutines for entering/leaving school Routines for beginning and ending classesRoutines for beginning and ending classes Routines for interpersonal conversationsRoutines for interpersonal conversations Routines moving between whole class and small groupRoutines moving between whole class and small group Routines for entering/leaving schoolRoutines for entering/leaving school Routines for beginning and ending classesRoutines for beginning and ending classes Routines for interpersonal conversationsRoutines for interpersonal conversations Routines moving between whole class and small groupRoutines moving between whole class and small group

62 62 Fundamental Skills

63 63 Fundamental Skills NotetakingNotetaking MemorizationMemorization Active ListeningActive Listening Social SkillsSocial Skills Social Emotional SkillsSocial Emotional Skills

64 AERIE Academy Two Week Suspended Curriculum Atlantic Community High School Delray Beach FL Social Studies EnglishMathScience Common Assessment Student Handbook Managing Emotions Decision Making Goal Setting FCAT Explorer Positive Communication Maximizing Life / Minimizing Stress Bonding & Relationships Assertiveness Respect for Self Addiction Drug Free Study Skills Success Profiles Team Building Study Skills

65 65 Improving Student Habits Activity International Center for Leadership in Education page 38

66 66 Improving Fundamental Skills Activity International Center for Leadership in Education page 39

67 67 Team Building Activity Activity International Center for Leadership in Education

68 68 Personalize Learning Make each student feel unique. Connect to the youth culture. Recognize cultural differences. Consider the student point of view. Be aware of different learning styles. Differentiate instruction. Attend to students with special needs. Intervene early.

69 69 Needle Art Video

70 70 Carousel - Improving Personalization Activity International Center for Leadership in Education

71 71 Brainstorming Personalization Challenges Activity International Center for Leadership in Education


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