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2010: The Year the Geospatial Industry Came of Age David DiBiase, CMS, GISP Penn State University National Geospatial Technology Center GeoEd ‘10 Jefferson.

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Presentation on theme: "2010: The Year the Geospatial Industry Came of Age David DiBiase, CMS, GISP Penn State University National Geospatial Technology Center GeoEd ‘10 Jefferson."— Presentation transcript:

1 2010: The Year the Geospatial Industry Came of Age David DiBiase, CMS, GISP Penn State University National Geospatial Technology Center GeoEd ‘10 Jefferson Community & Technical College Louisville KY June 23, 2010 Sponsors include the National Science Foundation’s Advanced Technological Education program [DUE # ]. Author’s opinions are not necessarily shared by NSF.

2 1.Five new geospatial occupations established 2.Geospatial Technology Competency Model (GTCM) published Two important developments at DOLETA

3 : Original GTCM : Industry Definition Workshops : GIS&T Body of Knowledge 2008: Skills in Professional Geography : Final GTCM

4 A competency is the capability of applying or using knowledge, skills, abilities, behaviors, and personal characteristics to successfully perform critical work tasks, specific functions, or operate in a given role or position. Ennis, M.R. (2008). Competency Models: A Review of the Literature and The Role of the Employment and Training Administration (ETA),

5 A competency model is a descriptive tool that identifies the competencies needed to operate in a specific role with a(n) job, occupation, organization, or industry. Building block model

6 Competencies needed in many occupations and industries at national scale Competencies needed for various occupations within an industry Competencies needed for various occupations within an industry sector Competencies required for particular occupations identified by DoL partners (e.g., GeoTech Center) Requirements for specialized degrees, licensure, or certification (e.g., GISCI) Knowledge areas required for particular occupations identified by workforce analysts Management competencies Building block model

7 1.Gather background information 2.Develop draft competency model framework 3.Gather feedback from industry representatives 4.Refine the competency model framework 5.Validate the competency model framework 6.Finalize the model framework DOLETA Competency Modeling Process PMRI, Inc. (2005). Technical Assistance Guide for Developing and Using Competency Models—One Solution for a Demand=Driven Workforce System.

8 JanFebMarAprMayJunJulAug SepOctNovDec GeoTech NVC Corpus Christi Recommendation to “engage DoL” 1 st meeting with DoL ETA Re: GTCM URISA presentation 2009 ESRI EdUC presentation Propose approach to complete GTCM 2 nd meeting with DoL ETA 3 rd meeting with DoL ETA Workshop participants invited Project timeline

9 GTCM panelists

10 JanFebMarAprMayJunJulAug SepOctNovDec 2010 GTCM workshop Scottsdale AZ URISA presentation ESRI EdUC presentation Public review period 3 revisions Finished GTCM published Assessment instrument demo at UCGIS GeoTech NVC Denver Report on GTCM strategy GeoEd ‘10 conference Rocket City Geospatial conference Project timeline

11

12 Department of Labor Employment and Training Administration (2010). Competency Model Clearinghouse.

13 The geospatial occupations … Does not include geospatial software programmers

14 Meltz, Don (2009). GIS Is Dead–Long Live GIS. PlanIt Crafter blog is-dead-long-live-gis/ Accessed November 2, 2010 “GIS is on it’s way out as a profession, but GIS will continue to be used as a tool in many other professions.” “My advice to someone that wants to get into the GIS field is – don’t, because it’s not going to be around much longer.” Reports of death of GIS exaggerated

15 1.Assess alignment of geospatial education and training curricula with workforce needs (GTCM assessment worksheets) 2.Increase rigor of certification requirements for GIS professionals 3.Shore-up higher education requirements for professional surveyors 4.Identify the “moral ideal” of the GIS profession Unfinished business

16 1.Cast of mind—self awareness 2.Corpus of theory and knowledge 3.Social ideal 4.Ethical standards 5.Formal organizations 6.Hall of fame Attributes of a profession Pugh Accreditation 8.Certification and/or licensure Ford & Gibbs (1996) Pugh, Darrell L. (1989). Professionalism in Public Administration: Problems, Perspectives, and the Role of the ASPA. Public Administration Review 49:1, 1-8. Ford, Gary and Norman E. Gibbs (1996). A Mature Profession of Software Engineering. Technical Report, Carnegie-Mellon University, January pdf

17 What is the GIS profession’s moral ideal? “A profession is a number of individuals in the same occupation voluntarily organized to earn a living by openly serving a certain moral ideal in a morally-permissible way…” (p. 3) Davis 2002 Davis, Michael (2002). Profession, Code, and Ethics. Burlington VT: Ashgate.

18 2010: The Year the Geospatial Industry Came of Age David DiBiase, CMS, GISP Penn State University National Geospatial Technology Center GeoEd ‘10 Jefferson Community & Technical College Louisville KY June 23, 2010 Sponsors include the National Science Foundation’s Advanced Technological Education program [DUE # ]. Author’s opinions are not necessarily shared by NSF.

19 Thanks for the invitation!

20

21 DACUM analysis “GIS Technicians”

22 Meta-DACUM chart

23 Geospatial industry sectors & markets Daratech “GIS/Geospatial Industry” Software$1.5 B Data$0.7 B Services$0.5 B Hardware$0.1 B 2004 revenue$2.8 B ASPRS “Remote Sensing Industry” Data Collection Data processing Software & Hardware “support” “Intermediaries” 2004 revenue$2.9 B Daratech markets Public Regulated (i.e. utilties, telecom, transportation and education) Private ASPRS markets Commercial/NFP Government Academia

24 “The geospatial industry acquires, integrates, manages, analyzes, maps, distributes, and uses geographic, temporal and spatial information and knowledge. The industry includes basic and applied research, technology development, education, and applications to address the planning, decision-making, and operations needs of people and organizations of all types.” (2006) Defining “the geospatial industry” “The geospatial technology industry includes any technology being used to collect, process, analyze, use, or display geospatial data and information to create a useful product for an end user.” (2001)

25 “The remote sensing industry is viewed as those commercial firms, not-for-profit organizations, governmental agencies and academic institutions involved in the capture, production, distribution, and application of remotely sensed geospatial data and information.” (2004) Defining “the geospatial industry” “The geospatial industry produces location- and time-specific data, transforms data into maps, images and many other forms of useful information, and applies information to create knowledge about the Earth and the human activities the Earth supports.” (2006)


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