Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Reauthorization of the Transition Requirements of IDEA 2004: Are We in Jeopardy or Can We Succeed? Dr. Mary E. Morningstar University of Kansas Dept. of.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Reauthorization of the Transition Requirements of IDEA 2004: Are We in Jeopardy or Can We Succeed? Dr. Mary E. Morningstar University of Kansas Dept. of."— Presentation transcript:

1 Reauthorization of the Transition Requirements of IDEA 2004: Are We in Jeopardy or Can We Succeed? Dr. Mary E. Morningstar University of Kansas Dept. of Special Education

2

3 Transition Coalition Instructor-led Online Professional Development Graduate Coursework KU TransCert Online Program KU-SET Doctoral Program Professional Development KU Summer Institute Continuing Ed. Online Classes Overview of Transition Transition Assessment Interagency Collaboration Employment Noninstructor-led Online Professional Development Online Modules Online Resources Searchable Databases Models of Success

4 User friendly and interactive information Making sense of complex information Applying information Connecting and networking

5 Online Information, Training & Resources Materials & publications Resources “Mini- modules” National database of programs Links

6 Models of Success ● Grassroots Efforts ● Exemplary Transition Programs ● Individual Success Stories

7 4 Transition Masters Courses –Transition Across the Lifespan –Vocational Training & Employment –Transition Assessment –Interagency & Community Services KU TransCert Courses

8 Transition & IEP Transition Assessment Other Requirements Elements of Transition Services Why Transition ? 500

9 Why was transition included in IDEA? Beginning in the mid-1980’s, the U.S. Department of Education recognized that the first group of students who had been all the way through special education were leaving school and unsuccessful in adult life. Unemployment, lack of enrollment in postsecondary education, continued dependence on parents, social isolation, and lack of involvement in community-based activities were found among young adults with disabilities.

10 What happens to students with disabilities after high school? Post-school outcome research indicates that the current special education curriculum, instruction, and planning are not meeting students' needs. The National Council on Disability (2004) reported that many youth and young adults with disabilities do not learn or use the skills in their school programs that they need to achieve productivity, empowerment, and independence.

11 Why interagency collaboration is not present? Limited levels of service coordination and collaboration among schools and community service agencies have created difficulties for students with disabilities in achieving positive post-school results (Johnson, et al., 2002). In many circumstances, students with disabilities leave school without appropriate community supports necessary to achieve successful adult outcomes. Many students remained at home with nothing to do because they were on long waiting lists for adult services.

12 What happens to students who drop out of school? This is one of the most serious problems facing special education programs across the country. Almost 1/3 of all youth with disabilities exit the school system by dropping out. Youth with ED have the highest drop out rates (from 21% to 64% - twice the rate of nondisabled students). The drop out rate for students with learning disabilities averages 32% (National Center for Education Statistics, 2001). Dropouts have fewer options for employment, usually entry level and low-paying positions; are more likely to end up in juvenile justice; and do not go on to postsecondary education and training

13 What are critical elements of transition planning? Transition to Adulthood Transition Planning & IEP Family Involvement Student Involvement Curriculum & Instruction Inclusion, Access & Accountability Interagency & Community Services Transition Planning & IEP

14 IEP Results Process for Transition Services ( adapted from: O’Leary, 2005 ) Step 1: Measurable Postsecondary Goals Step 2: Present Levels of Academic Performance Step 3: Needed Transition Services Step 4: Annual IEP Goals a. Course of Study b. Needed Services: Instruction Related Services Community Experiences Employment and other post- school adult living objectives Daily Living skills & Functional Vocational Assessment (when appropriate) Age Appropriate Transition Assessments Education or Training Employment Independent Living Step 5: Summary of Performance

15 “a coordinated set of activities for a student that – (A) is designed to be within a results-oriented process that is focused on improving the academic and functional achievement of the child with a disability to facilitate the child’s movement from school to post-school activities, including post-secondary education, vocational education, integrated employment (including supported employment), continuing and adult education, adult services, independent living, or community participation.”

16 (B) based on the individual child’s needs, taking into account the child’s strengths, preferences, and interests; and (C) includes instruction, related services, community experiences, the development of employment and other post-school adult living objectives, and when appropriate, acquisition of daily living skills and functional vocational evaluation. (Section 602, (34). What is the definition of transition in IDEA?

17 What are the major requirements for the transition IEP? When transition planning starts What happens when a student reaches the age of majority What must be developed when a student exists school At the front of the IEP and drive all IEP goals and objectives Open-ended narrative in which the student’s needs, strengths, preferences, and interests are expressed Parent and student input is critical Focus on postschool outcomes; not available services

18 What must be in the IEP beginning no later than the IEP in effect when the student turns 16 and annually thereafter ? A student's IEP must include appropriate measurable postsecondary goals based upon age appropriate transition assessments related to training, education, employment, and where appropriate, independent living skills. The IEP must include those transition services (including courses of study) needed to assist the student in reaching postsecondary goals. (Section 614)

19 What are measurable postsecondary goals? A statement that articulates what the student would like to achieve after high school based on student’s strengths, preferences, and interests. Once postschool outcomes are explicitly stated, IEP team must then plan for goals through… 1.Transition assessment 2.Transition services 3.IEP goals, 4.Interagency collaboration …to ensure most likely achievement

20 Examples (adapted from NSTTAC.org): Upon completion of high school, John will pursue a general associates degree program at a community college in August of (separate, education or training) Upon completion from high school, Jason will pursue his undergraduate degree in history and education, to become a high school social studies teacher. (combo: education or training and employment) Upon completion of high school, Paulo will independently prepare for work each day by dressing, making his bed, making his lunch, and accessing transportation. (separate, independent living)

21 Training Specific vocational or career field, independent living skills training, vocational training program, apprenticeship, OJT, job corps, etc. 15 year old example: Upon completion from high school I/David will be enrolled full-time in an on-the-job training program. 17 year old example: Upon completion from high school, I/David will be enrolled full-time in a plumbing apprenticeship program. Adapted from: Gilles & Maitrejean (2006)

22 Education 4 year college or university, technical college, 2 year college, etc. 15 year old example: Upon completion of HS, I/Walter will be enrolled full- time at a technical college or university. 17 year old example: Upon completion of HS, I/Walter will be enrolled full- time in a teacher education program leading to licensure. Adapted from: Gilles & Maitrejean (2006)

23 Employment Paid (competitive, supported, sheltered); unpaid employment (volunteer, in a training capacity); military; etc. 15 year old example: Upon completion of HS, I/Riley will work full-time. 18 year old example: Upon completion of HS, I/Riley will work full-time for a construction company. Adapted from: Gilles & Maitrejean (2006)

24 Independent Living Adult living, daily living, independent living, financial, transportation, etc 14 year old example: Upon completion of HS, I/Betsey will live in a supported living apartment. 20 year old example for severe disability: Upon completion of HS, I/Betsey will live in my own apartment. Adapted from: Gilles & Maitrejean (2006)

25 What are transition assessments? In order to ensure that goals (postsecondary goals and annual IEP) are appropriate, we need to complete this process in order to have the information we need for effective transition planning

26 What is your definition of transition assessment? Transition assessment should be considered a process of collecting information that is directly relevant to postsecondary goals… Age appropriate transition assessments must systematic and planned and occur over the student’s school career.

27 Transition Assessment: Where Do You Start? Guiding Questions Planning for Assessment Using Data Integrating Data & IEP What and How to Assess Resources: Online module (Transition Assessment: The Big Picture & Assessment Resources pdfs of commercially available assessments & questions to ask ( Tools & Resources > Presentations)

28 What are transition services? These must be considered by the IEP team during the planning process include:  instruction,  community experiences,  related services,  the development of employment and other post-school adult living objectives,  and when appropriate, acquisition of daily living skills and functional vocational evaluations.

29 What are courses of study? “A multi-year description of coursework to achieve a student’s desired postschool goals that are meaningful to the student’s future and motivate the student to complete his or her education” From: Storms and O’Leary (2000)

30 Courses of Study: How Specific Do You Have to Be??? Grade 9: Reading, Study Skills, World Geography, Earth Science, Beginning Foods, Applied Math, Theater Grade 10: Oral and Written Communication, Reading, Applied Math, Intro. To Biology, Geography, Experience Based Career Education Grade 11: Algebra, U.S. History, Natural Resources/Forestry, PE, Computer Studies, Photography, Single Survival, Cooperative Work Experiences Grade 12: Composition, Government, Technical Carpentry, Natural Resources and Forestry (dual enrollment program), Alternative Cooperative Education (1) Sam expresses an interest in pursuing post-secondary education upon graduation from high school. He will need to determine entrance requirements for the colleges he is considering and complete the courses required. Sam should enroll in the college preparatory course at the high school to receive support in the areas of study skills, time management, organizational skills and self-advocacy skills. (2) Suzie expresses an interest in seeking full-time competitive employment or technical skills upon graduation from high school. She should investigate the program options at the regional vocational-technical school and determine necessary prerequisites. If this is not feasible, Suzie should address how she will begin career exploration, job training and community based work experience as part of her high school program. From: Colorado Dept. of Ed. Fast Facts (2000)

31 What are the age of majority requirements? This activity must occur beginning not later than one year before the student reaches the age of majority under State law… students and parents are to be notified of the specific rights which will transfer to the student once he or she turns 18 & documentation must be found in the IEP.

32 Who is responsible for ensuring that transition services are implemented? In the case where a participating agency, other than the educational agency, fails to provide agreed upon services, the educational agency shall reconvene the IEP team to identify alternative strategies to meet the transition objective.

33 Who should participate in transition planning? Family Members Student Education personnel School support staff Community members Peers and friends Administrators Postsecondary Ed. staff Community Service Providers

34 What is a comprehensive re-evaluation? This process “shall not be required before the termination of a child's eligibility under this part due to graduation from secondary school with a regular diploma.”

35 What is a summary of performance? “… a local educational agency shall provide the child with a summary of the child's academic achievement and functional performance, which shall include recommendations on how to assist the child in meeting the child's postsecondary goals.” IDEA 2004 Sec. 614c (5)

36 For a student whose eligibility terminates due to graduation from secondary school or exceeding the age eligibility for a free appropriate education under State law: (i) a member of the student’s IEP Team … shall provide the student with a written Performance Summary; (ii) … be based on a historical review of functional assessment and evaluation data as well as an interpretation of the effectiveness of accommodations and supports; (iii) … specify information and data that documents the student’s disability; provide information on the nature and extent of academic and functional limitations caused by the disability; and provide information on the effectiveness of accommodations, supports and assistive technology previously used to reduce the functional impact of the disability. (iv) the Performance Summary should include, whenever possible: (a) the most recent evaluations or data that support the narrative above; and (b) student input regarding the functional limitations of her/his disability and use and effectiveness of accommodations and supports.

37 What is Indicator 13? Percent of youth aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes coordinated, measurable, annual IEP goals and transition services that will reasonably enable the child to meet the postsecondary goals. [20 U. S. C (a)(3)(B)]

38 What is the NSTTAC Indicator 13 Checklist? 1.Is there a measurable postsecondary goal or goals that covers education or training, employment, and as needed, independent living? 2.Is (are) there annual IEP goal(s) that will reasonably enable the child to meet the postsecondary goal(s)? 3.Are there transition services in the IEP that focus on improving the academic and functional achievement of the child to facilitate their movement from school to post-school? 4.For transition services that are likely to be provided or paid for by other agencies with parent (or child once the age of majority is reached) consent, is there evidence that representatives of the agency(ies) were invited to the IEP meeting? 5.Is there evidence that the measurable postsecondary goal(s) were based on age-appropriate transition assessment(s)? 6.Do the transition services include courses of study that focus on improving the academic and functional achievement of the child to facilitate their movement from school to post-school? Does the IEP meet the requirements of Indicator 13? (Circle one) –Yes (all Ys or NAs are circled) –No (one or more Ns circled)

39 Indicator 13 Example Adapted from: NSTTAC 1. Measurable Postsecondary Goal: Upon completion of high school, John will enroll in the general Associates Degree program at Ocean County Community College in August of IEP Goal: Given information about community college programs, John will demonstrate knowledge of the college’s admission requirements by verbally describing these requirements and identifying admission deadlines with 90% accuracy by November, Transition Services: Use of guided notes for lessons Use of guided notes for lessons Use of Assistive technology such as audio-taped texts for English 12 Use of Assistive technology such as audio-taped texts for English 12 Instruction related to advocating for needed accommodations Instruction related to advocating for needed accommodations Vocational Rehabilitation referral to determine eligibility for tuition assistance Vocational Rehabilitation referral to determine eligibility for tuition assistance

40 4. Evidence of Invitation: A consent form signed by John’s father, indicating that the LEA may contact the disability services office at Ocean County Community College A consent form signed by John’s father, indicating that the LEA may contact the disability services office at Ocean County Community College An invitation to conference in the file, mailed to an individual in the disability services office of Ocean County Community College An invitation to conference in the file, mailed to an individual in the disability services office of Ocean County Community College Invitation to conference of Vocational Rehabilitation for eligibility determination in the file with corresponding parental consent Invitation to conference of Vocational Rehabilitation for eligibility determination in the file with corresponding parental consent 5. Transition Assessment: Student grades Student grades Results of Self- Determination assessments Results of Self- Determination assessments Career interest inventories Career interest inventories AT assessment AT assessment Student interview Student interview Parent questionnaire Parent questionnaire 6. Course of Study: 12th grade year: Psychology (semester), English 12 (year), Algebra II (year), Band (year), Phys Ed. (semester), Cooperative Work Experience (semester), Advanced Biology (year), Child Development (semester), Resource Room (year) Indicator 13 Example Cont.

41 IEP Results Process for Transition Services ( adapted from: O’Leary, 2005 ) Step 1: Measurable Postsecondary Goals Step 2: Present Levels of Academic Performance Step 3: Needed Transition Services Step 4: Annual IEP Goals a. Course of Study b. Needed Services: Instruction Related Services Community Experiences Employment and other post- school adult living objectives Daily Living skills & Functional Vocational Assessment (when appropriate) Age Appropriate Transition Assessments Education or Training Employment Independent Living Step 5: Summary of Performance


Download ppt "Reauthorization of the Transition Requirements of IDEA 2004: Are We in Jeopardy or Can We Succeed? Dr. Mary E. Morningstar University of Kansas Dept. of."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google