Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Quality Assurance of Engineering Undergraduate Education: The Canadian Experience Bachelors of Engineering and Technology in Modern Industry, Science and.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Quality Assurance of Engineering Undergraduate Education: The Canadian Experience Bachelors of Engineering and Technology in Modern Industry, Science and."— Presentation transcript:

1 Quality Assurance of Engineering Undergraduate Education: The Canadian Experience Bachelors of Engineering and Technology in Modern Industry, Science and Business, June 17 – 18, 2004, Moscow, Russia J. O’Brien, M.A.Sc., P.Eng. D. Wolfe, P.Eng.

2 Engineering in Canada A self-regulated profession A self-regulated profession Constitution Act of 1867 Constitution Act of 1867 Philosophy: Philosophy: Members of the profession are “best qualified to determine the appropriate standard of professional competence and ethics required for the protection of the public”.

3 Associations/Ordre: Overview 12 regulatory entities 12 regulatory entities Established via provincial/ territorial legislation Established via provincial/ territorial legislation >160,000 P.Eng. >160,000 P.Eng. –18,000 trained outside Canada

4 Associations/Ordre: Membership Association/OrdrePEI Nova Scotia New Brunswick Newfoundland & Labrador Québec OntarioManitobaSaskatchewanAlberta British Columbia Yukon Northwest Territories & Nunavut Licenses*1504,5002,0002,00045,00063,0004,5003,00035,00016,

5 Associations/Ordre: Responsibilities Right to title (exclusive scope of practice) Right to title (exclusive scope of practice) Set standards for licensure Set standards for licensure Ensure compliance Ensure compliance Take enforcement action Take enforcement action

6 Requirements for Licensure Undergraduate degree Undergraduate degree Engineering experience Engineering experience Ethics and law Ethics and law Good character Good character Communication skills Communication skills

7 Canadian Council of Professional Engineers Federation of provincial/territorial associations that license engineers Federation of provincial/territorial associations that license engineers Represents profession nationally and internationally Represents profession nationally and internationally Prepares national criteria and guidelines Prepares national criteria and guidelines Accredits university engineering educational programs Accredits university engineering educational programs

8 The Canadian Educational System Education is a provincial/territorial responsibility Education is a provincial/territorial responsibility –13 provinces/territories = 13 education systems 3 educational stages: 3 educational stages: –Elementary (primary) –Secondary –Post-secondary Elementary + Secondary = 12 years Elementary + Secondary = 12 years

9 Publicly-funded Publicly-funded Starts at 6 years of age Starts at 6 years of age Attendance compulsory to age 15 or 16 years Attendance compulsory to age 15 or 16 years Elementary and Secondary Schooling

10 Post-secondary Education Governed by provinces/territories Governed by provinces/territories Universities and colleges Universities and colleges Funding from: Funding from: –Provinces/territories –Federal Government –Tuition –External sources

11 Engineering Education 3 degree levels: 3 degree levels: –Bachelor’s –Master’s –Doctoral Entrance requirements consistent across Canada: Entrance requirements consistent across Canada: –Complete secondary education (12 years) –Common suite of secondary school courses (math, physics, language) Minimum 4 years of study Minimum 4 years of study

12 Engineering Education (cont’d.) 36 post-secondary institutions 36 post-secondary institutions 71 fields of study 71 fields of study 236 accredited programs 236 accredited programs 50,000 students 50,000 students 8,700 graduates per year 8,700 graduates per year

13 Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board Goals: Goals: –Quality assurance –Continuous improvement Develops criteria, processes, procedures Develops criteria, processes, procedures Advises Associations/Ordre Advises Associations/Ordre

14 Accreditation: Purpose Competence in engineering plus understanding of impact of engineering on society Competence in engineering plus understanding of impact of engineering on society Emphasis on: Emphasis on: –quality of students –academic and support systems and staff –educational facilities To identify those engineering programs that meet accreditation criteria To identify those engineering programs that meet accreditation criteria

15 Accreditation: Assumptions Undergraduate programs only Undergraduate programs only Program, not departments, faculties, or schools Program, not departments, faculties, or schools 16 years of education 16 years of education Criteria: Criteria: –Input-based –Outcomes-based –Constant evolution

16 Accreditation: International Activities Mobility for engineers and quality assurance of international qualifications Mobility for engineers and quality assurance of international qualifications External Initiatives: External Initiatives: –Mutual Recognition Agreements –Washington Accord –Substantial Equivalency Visits Internal Initiatives: Internal Initiatives: –Facilitate licensure for internationally-trained engineers engineers

17 International Engineering Graduates Engineering in Canada Engineering in Canada –96% employment rate –Salaries 50% higher than national average –Range of disciplines and employers FC21: From Consideration to Integration FC21: From Consideration to Integration –Determine barriers –Enhance processes –Public safety not to be compromised –Academic and professional standards are maintained

18 FC21: From Consideration to Integration 3 phases 3 phases 1.Data collection 2.Analysis and identification of enhancements 3.Implementation of process improvements Preliminary Findings Preliminary Findings –Understanding licensure requirements across Canada –Assessment of academic qualifications –Timeframe for licensure Possible Conclusions: Possible Conclusions: –Quality assurance provided by International agreements and “substantial equivalency” –Communication is key

19 Increasing importance of international activities Increasing importance of international activities Assurance that high standards are maintained Assurance that high standards are maintained Facilitating licensure of internationally trained engineers in Canada Facilitating licensure of internationally trained engineers in Canada –Referrals to other professions Facilitating mobility for Canadian-trained engineers Facilitating mobility for Canadian-trained engineers Future Considerations

20 Questions? FOR MORE INFORMATION... Tel: Fax: Web:


Download ppt "Quality Assurance of Engineering Undergraduate Education: The Canadian Experience Bachelors of Engineering and Technology in Modern Industry, Science and."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google