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New Mexico Transition Initiatives: Policy Effecting Improved Outcomes Adolfo Vasquez, NMPED Special Education Bureau James Alarid, Ph.D., N.M. Highlands.

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Presentation on theme: "New Mexico Transition Initiatives: Policy Effecting Improved Outcomes Adolfo Vasquez, NMPED Special Education Bureau James Alarid, Ph.D., N.M. Highlands."— Presentation transcript:

1 New Mexico Transition Initiatives: Policy Effecting Improved Outcomes Adolfo Vasquez, NMPED Special Education Bureau James Alarid, Ph.D., N.M. Highlands University Glenn Damian, Regional Education Cooperative #4 Ginger Blalock, Ph.D., Educ-Transition Consulting LLC Marilyn D’Ottavio, Albuquerque Public Schools

2 Communities of Practice Model Common purpose and goals Diverse membership Participatory framework Connections with larger community Dynamic in terms of membership and activities From: Buysse, V., Sparkman, K.L., & Wesley, P.W. (2003). Communities of practice: Connecting what we know with what we do. Exceptional Children, 69,

3 Improve Student Outcomes National Partners NM Core Team Interagency Collaboration Professional Development Student Leadership Data Collection & Use Conceptual Framework Communities of Practice

4 Statewide Transition Coordinating Council Varied Advocacy Groups & Efforts Communities of Practice Children’s Medical Services Healthy Transitions Coordinating Council CYFD Youth in Transition Task Force NM Employment Initiative for PWDs Local/Regional Transition Teams

5 The New Mexico Approach Effective Transition Practices Increase Capacity to Implement Effective Transition Practices Facilitate Implementation of Effective Transition Practices Data CollectionProfessional Development Policy Analysis and Change Technical Assistance

6 Mission of the STCC The mission of the STCC is to facilitate, through the cooperation of all its members, the smooth transition of eligible students with disabilities from school to post-secondary education and/or training and employment.

7 STCC National Communities of Practice REC 4 Post School Outcomes Survey Kohler’s Transition Taxonomy O’Leary’s Transition Outcomes Project STCC-initiated Activities Communities of Practice

8 Professional Development Summer Transition Institute International DCDT Conference Regional and District Trainings Training of Trainers Transition Specialist Cadre Quarterly Meetings Varied Professional Development Activities Communities of Practice UNC Project TRAC KU Transition Coalition

9 Student Leadership Student-run Enterprises STCC Membership Funding for DCDT Conference Presentations & Participation Transition Specialist Cadre Meeting Speakers Student Leadership Efforts Communities of Practice Summer Transition Institute Speakers

10 Improve Student Outcomes LRE Initiative PBS Initiative Families as Faculty Early Childhood Initiative Transition Initiatives Linkages with Other SEB-funded Initiatives Leadership Development Project

11 STCC Rehabilitation Counseling Licensure in the Schools DDPC-funded Student Leadership & Self-determination Project Pathways to the Diploma for Students w/IEPs Graduation Requirements For all Students Grades 8-12 = Next Step Plan STCC-influenced Policy Changes Communities of Practice

12 Rehabilitation Counseling Licensure in New Mexico DEFINITIONS: A. Rehabilitation counseling means services provided by qualified personnel in individual or group sessions that focus specifically on career development, employment preparation, achieving independence, and integration in the workplace and community of a student with a disability who receives services under the federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). The term also includes vocational rehabilitation services provided to a student with disabilities by vocational rehabilitation programs funded under the federal Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended. B. Related fields means a degree in such areas as sociology, psychology, school counseling, guidance and counseling, education, special education, social work, and mental health.

13 Rehabilitation Definitions (cont’d) C. Transition services means a coordinated set of activities for a student with a disability, as defined in the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act 2004, that (1) Is designed within an outcome-oriented process that promotes movement from school to post-school activities, including postsecondary education, vocational training, integrated employment (including supported employment), continuing and adult education, adult services, independent living, or community participation;

14 Rehabilitation Definitions (cont’d) (2) Is based on the individual student’s needs, taking into account the student’s preferences and interests; and (3) Includes instruction, related services, community experiences, the development of employment and other post-school adult living objectives, and, if appropriate, acquisition of daily living skills and functional vocational evaluation.

15 Licensure Requirements Persons seeking licensure in rehabilitation counseling pursuant to the provisions of this regulation shall meet the requirements of Subsections A, B, C, D or E of NMAC: A. Valid certificate as a Certified Rehabilitation Counselor issued by the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification,

16 Licensure Requirements (cont’d) B. Master’s degree in rehabilitation counseling from a regionally accredited college or university. This requirement shall be satisfied by meeting the requirements of Subsections B(I) or B(2)below. (I) A master’s degree awarded by a New Mexico college or university must incorporate the New Mexico State Board of Education’s approved competencies in rehabilitation counseling. (2) A master’s degree awarded by a college or university outside of New Mexico must be for a rehabilitation counseling program approved by the New Mexico State Board of Education.

17 Licensure Requirements (cont’d) C. Master’s degree in school counseling, vocational counseling or other related field and the provisions of Subsection C( 1) or C(2) below. (1) One (1) year of experience in rehabilitation counseling, or - (2) Fifteen (15) semester hours of credit in the rehabilitation counseling competency areas of vocational/transition assessment, medical aspects of disability, psychosocial and/or psycho-cultural aspects of disability. case management in rehabilitation counseling, issues and practices in rehabilitation counseling, or placement aspects of rehabilitation counseling.

18 Licensure Requirements (cont’d) D. Bachelor’s degree in rehabilitation counseling from a regionally accredited college or university and one ())year of experience in a public or private facility in which direct vocational rehabilitation counseling is the primary job responsibility. The degree requirement shall be satisfied by meeting the requirements of Subsections D( 1) or D(2) below.

19 Licensure Requirements (cont’d) (1) A bachelor’s degree awarded by a New Mexico college or university must incorporate the New Mexico State Board of Education’s approved competencies in rehabilitation counseling. (2) A bachelor’s degree awarded by a college or university outside of New Mexico must be for a rehabilitation program approved by the New Mexico State Board of Education.

20 Licensure Requirements (cont’d) E. Bachelor’s degree in a related field and the provisions of Subsection E( 1) or E(2) below. (1) two (2) years of experience in a public or private facility in which direct vocational rehabilitation counseling is the primary job responsibility, or (2) Fifteen (15) semester hours of credit in the rehabilitation counseling competency areas of vocational/transition assessment, medical aspects of disability, psychosocial and/or psycho-cultural aspects of disability, case management in rehabilitation counseling, issues and practices itt rehabilitation counseling, or placement aspects of rehabilitation counseling.

21 Entry Level Rehabilitation Competencies Competencies for Entry-Level Rehabilitation Counselors. The rehabilitation counselor will be able to: A. Provide those individualized and/or group services, which will assist in career development, employment preparation, self-determination development; vocational assessment, and integration in the workplace and community for all students. B. Demonstrate job development skills and address application of job modification assistance. C. Provide technical assistance to special education teachers in developing transition plans and implementing those plans. D. Provide program development at the high school and middle school level that supports transition planning and provides a continuum of career development activities from exploration through planning.

22 Entry Level Rehabilitation Competencies (cont’d) E. Provide assistance with course selection and registration for middle school and high school students including special education students. F. Demonstrate strong leadership skills and teamwork through interagency collaboration; working with general education staff, vocational education staff: parents, students, employers, adult service providers and post secondary education representatives. G. Demonstrate knowledge of labor markets, post-secondary opportunities, curricula and materials that support the identification of student aptitudes, interests, preferences, and strengths. H. Participate in meetings of individualized educational program (IEP) teams that address transition requirements for students served under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).

23 Entry Level Rehabilitation Competencies (cont’d) I. Provide staff development in the area of transition for students with disabilities including training for students, employers, counselors, teachers, parents, and other service providers. J. Provide leadership in self-determination, including facilitating the participation of students in their own IEP team meetings. K. Work with the NM Public Education Department of to ensure compliance with applicable state and federal regulations. L. Participate in professional development activities to maintain knowledge of preferred practices.

24 Application Tips Applicants need letters of recommendation identifying experiences: One of your letters must be from a supervisor/principal. The supervisor/principal should Identify his or her role in the first paragraph. All letters must clarify your experiences by connecting them to the entry-level NM Rehabilitation Counselor Competencies The licensure unit does not understand: ChoiceMaker curriculum Transition Specialist Cadre Summer Transition Institute

25 Tips (cont’d) The licensure unit does understand: (Below are examples of what should be included in your supervisor’s letter and on your resume of skills.) (See competencies on page 2 of regulations) Implemented self-determination curriculum to facilitate participation of students in their own IEP meetings Participated in state level transition trainings in areas of: Career/vocational assessment Networking with adult agencies Facilitated parent participation in transition Established a district/regional transition team Provided transition training to parents, students and staff Provided assistance with course selection

26 STUDENT LEADERSHIP AND SELF-ADVOCACY PROJECT Funded by the N.M. Developmental Disabilities Planning Council

27 Purpose of Student Leadership & Self-Advocacy Project Increase student involvement and leadership in educational planning (and integration with peers without disabilities) by teaching self- determination and self-advocacy skills. By Providing training to statewide teams of students and school personnel through self- determination curricula (using various curricula and a peer training model). And by Evaluating the results of school-based implementation.

28 3 Phases of Funding with Varied Contractors Phase 1 ( ): Via Regional Education Cooperative (REC) 3 (north central NM) and REC 4 (northeastern NM) Phase 2 ( ): Via Executive Leadership Council (Santa Fe) & the Statewide Transition Coordinating Council (STCC) Phase 3 ( ): Via N.M. Highlands University’s Center for Education & Study of Diverse Populations & STCC

29 Partners – Phase 1 Steve Aguirre, REC 3 Director Glenn Damian, REC 4 Transition Coordinator James Alarid, NM Highlands Univ. School Districts

30 Partners – Phases 2 and 3 James Alarid, Project Director, N.M. Highlands University Carole Brito, Project Director, CESDP, N.M. Highlands University Ginger Blalock, Lead Trainer, Special Education, University of New Mexico Karen Chism, Asst. Trainer, Transition Coord./Region IX Education Cooperative Paula Kohler, Evaluator, Western Michigan University School Districts

31 The Project met the following NMDDPC 5-Year State Plan objective (Emphasis 2: Education & Early Intervention) To provide training to teams of students with disabilities and school personnel in self-advocacy skills, such as self-directed Individualized Education Plans, public speaking, facilitation skills, etc.

32 Phase 1 Strategies Innovative local implementation ideas that integrated: Students with significant support needs Student-created PowerPoint presentations Computer-based learning Inclusive delivery model Improved long-term student outcomes

33 Steps in Implementing the Project (Phase 3) 1.Recruit districts (at least 25 schools) 2.Prepare on-site trainers/technical assistance support personnel 3.Deliver training workshops to participating districts who commit to implementation 4.In , identify and train peers to provide support to students on-site 5.Support districts in implementation with on- site and distance-delivered TA 6.Collect data at district level (1000 students)

34 Alignment Opportunities State-recommended IEP Form Transition Outcomes Project; Transition Specialist Cadre Mission Statement Pathways to the Diploma Interim and Final Next Step Plans High School Initiative targets (rigor, relevance, relationships) IDEA requirements and New Mexico’s Standards for Excellence No Child Left Behind Act requirements

35 Taxonomy for Transition Programming IEP Development Student Participation Planning Strategies STUDENT-FOCUSED PLANNING PROGRAM STRUCTURES Program Philosophy Program Policy Strategic Planning Program Evaluation Resource Allocation Human Resource Development STUDENT DEVELOPMENT Life Skills Instruction Employment Skills Instruction Career & Vocational Curricula Structured Work Experience Assessment Support Services FAMILY INVOLVEMENT Family Training Family Involvement Family Empowerment Collaborative Framework Collaborative Service Delivery INTERAGENCY COLLABORATION

36 Data Collection and Analysis Specific self-determination and leadership instruction implemented, and how Student demonstration of skills (IEPs, other) Documentation of additional student leadership roles Measurement of teacher, parent, and student satisfaction Measurement of training workshops’ efficacy Dissemination of results across several venues

37 Sample Stats – Phase 2 Participating # of Students # of Special # of Ss # of Gen’l Districts w/IEPs Ed Tchrs no IEPs Ed Tchrs A.P.S Bernalillo Clovis La Academia de Esperanza Charter Las Vegas = = = = = = = = = = = = TOTAL

38 Sample Student Outcomes – Phase 3 (0-3 point scale) 1. I identified my post-school goals (what I want to do after H.S.) I provided information about my strengths I provided information about my limitations or problem areas I provided information about my interests I provided information about the courses I want to take I reviewed my past goals and performance I asked for feedback/info from others at my IEP meeting I identified the support I need I summarized the decisions made at the meeting1.65

39 Sample Student Comments – Phase 3 – “What I Liked” It mattered what I thought and wanted for my life Got to say what wanted. Liked being in charge Getting to talk first and not my mom. PUTTING INFO ON POWERPOINT. I GOT TO HOST THE IEP. I FELT I WAS BEING LISTENED TO. I GOT TO KNOW MY TEACHERS BETTER. THAT PEOPLE GAVE ME RESPECT. I LIKED THE FEEDBACK EVERYONE GAVE ME HAVING CHOICES FOR ONCE. I GOT TO PICK MY CLASSES. I GOT TO TALK ABOUT MY INTERESTS. LIKED BEING MYSELF. BEING HAPPY. PEOPLE TOLD ME HOW GOOD I DID ON MY GOALS. EVERYBODY WAS HERE AND EVERYBODY LISTENED TO ME. I WAS ABLE TO "ADVOCATE" FOR MYSELF, WHICH FELT GOOD. I WAS INCLUDED IN DECISION MAKING. IT WAS SHORT. THEY WERE LISTENING TO ME SPEAK. I GOT TO RUN IT. I GOT TO USE THE GOALS I WORKED ON FOR MY POSTSECONDARY PREP CLASS. MOSTLY THAT EVERYONE WAS CONCENTRATED ON THE THINGS THAT I WANTED TO DO/FINISH IN THE NEXT YEAR. THINGS THAT I HAVE GOTTEN BETTER ON EVERYTHING. HAD INPUT.


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