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Stakeholder Consultations Kim Allen, P.Eng. CEO/Registrar Professional Engineers Ontario April 1, 2009 National Framework for Membership and Licensure.

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Presentation on theme: "Stakeholder Consultations Kim Allen, P.Eng. CEO/Registrar Professional Engineers Ontario April 1, 2009 National Framework for Membership and Licensure."— Presentation transcript:

1 Stakeholder Consultations Kim Allen, P.Eng. CEO/Registrar Professional Engineers Ontario April 1, 2009 National Framework for Membership and Licensure Membership has its privileges Licensure ensures... Public Accountability

2 2 When did regulation start? Whenever An engineer constructed an arch, as the capstone was hoisted into place, the engineer assumed accountability for his work in the most profound way possible: The ancient Romans had a tradition: Whenever An engineer constructed an arch, as the capstone was hoisted into place, the engineer assumed accountability for his work in the most profound way possible: he stood under the arch!

3 3 What’s the Problem? Today’s Legislative Frameworks do not reflect the realities of a modern engineering profession.

4 4 Bureaucracy defends the status quo long past the time when the quo has lost its status. Laurence J. Peter Current licensing regimes established in the 1920s

5 5 What are the symptoms? PEO internal concerns: Low uptake rates by Canadian and International Graduates Enhanced student membership program Seamless transition from undergraduate to licensed P. Eng. A structured, measurable, knowledge-based internship program Close the back doors to the practice of professional engineering Alignment of licensing process and regulations Effectiveness of the Certificate of Authorization PEO external concerns: Licensed Engineering Technologists Full mobility in Canada Better mobility with the US Recommendations of “From Consideration to Integration”

6 6 What are the drivers? No licensing model adequately addresses all of these issues Premiers inter-provincial trade agreement... they say they’ll guarantee full labour mobility across the country October 2008, the President-SLG initiated a task force to develop a vision and a set of principles for a National Framework for Membership & Licensure.

7 7 What should the Framework Accomplish? 1.Facilitate National Harmonization 2.Ensure Full Mobility 3.Make Enforcement Easier/Effective 4.Provide Leadership in Labour Force Development 5.Register all Engineers with the Profession

8 8 1. National Harmonization Provincial Acts/Regulations are increasingly different Different requirement to obtain and maintain a licence/membership Different exceptions to be licensed Different title protection

9 9 The National Framework for Membership & Licensure requires uniform legislation regarding:  Requirements for membership, licences, designations and specializations  Exceptions not to be licensed  Protection of titles and designations  Facilitating practice with other regulated professions doing engineering  Rigour of due diligence for licensing, complaints, discipline and enforcement

10 10 National Framework for Membership and Licensure What’s already in place?  National Accreditation system  National International Institute Degree Database  National Database of licence holders and members  Common Membership Application Form  Presidents-SLG adopted the concept for further discussion leading toward a nationally accepted vision and established a task force to:  promote and support Presidents’ consultations with Councils, members & stakeholders,  develop/refine the National Vision for adoption by the Constituent Members in May 2009.

11 11 2. Ensure Full Mobility Alignment with the objectives of the Agreement on Internal Trade Remove obstacles to competitiveness Provide barrier free mobility for all members and licence holders Mobility easy – with uniform requirements and uniform rigour of assessments.

12 12 3. Make Enforcement Easier/Effective The same engineering activities, products and services regulated in all jurisdictions So the public is assured that all engineers are competent and accountable for the work they do, Public health, safety and welfare are protected Easier to govern members than non-members Supervisory exception makes it impossible to govern all individuals practising engineering, Engineering teams are regulated and work together.

13 13 Simplify Enforcement Establish a Statutory Tribunal for enforcement matters Eliminate the need for the courts to deal with enforcement matters Operates under the auspices of the professional engineering organizations. Decisions may be appealed to court Jurisdiction limited by the establishing legislation Subject to the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

14 14 Reduction of the current public confusion of licence holders vs. engineering graduates Titles, designations, licences and membership would be distinct and clear to the public. All registered members would be obligated to a common code of ethics, and would be obligated to ensure clarity to the public.

15 Required Reach of Engineering Regulation

16 16 4. E xercise Leadership in Labour Force Development Today governments and the public are demanding that professional regulators expand their role to ensure there is an adequate supply of qualified practitioners in the areas of demand. Credential recognition, workforce development and mobility become national competitive advantages, Better utilization of “engineering” skills and talent Members are helped to become licensed Seamless transition for Students to P.Eng. Seamless process from consideration to integration for International Engineering Graduates

17 17 Engineering Labour Market Two-thirds of persons with a Canadian university degree in engineering were employed outside engineering occupations. For those who obtained their engineering degree outside of Canada, the proportion was over 80%. Approximately 30% of persons classified by the Census as working in engineering occupations were not university engineering graduates. Source (2006 Census)

18 18 5. Register all Engineers with the Profession Differentiate between registering with the profession and being licensed to practice engineering United profession = more public policy clout Regulators assume that the P.Engs are the profession Licence holders only make up one-third of the profession Public believes all "iron ringer wearers" are engineers Under 50% of Canadian engineering grads apply to be licensed 30% of applicants can't get four years of experience Ensure that registration and licensure are seen as being necessary and that they add value. Reframe engineering as a welcoming, engaging and inclusive profession.

19 The Engineering Profession Technology Engineering Engineering regulators regulate the practice of professional engineering and govern licence and certificate holders in order that the public interest may be served and protected. Exceptions Natural Science Today’s Legislation do not include all in the Engineering Profession Applied Science Professions

20 20 International Engineering Graduate Application Timing

21 21 Annual Disparity GAP 1 PEO’s P. Eng. Licence Applications to 2007

22 22 Annual Disparity GAP 2 PEO’s P. Eng. Licence Applications to 2007

23 23 Value of Licensure & Registration “It is clear licensure and certification are seen as bulwarks for the ethic and culture of professionalism and that this is the major factor behind support for licensure and certification on the part of both professional employees and their employers.” Engineering and Technology Labour Market Study 2008

24 24 Significance of Licensure Source: 2008 Labour Market Survey –Employee Report

25 25 Significance of Registration Source: 2008 Labour Market Survey –Employee Report

26 26 Council’s across Canada are asked to consider the following motion: That Council: Support the vision for a National Framework for Membership and Licensure; Endorse the Principles – National Framework for Membership and Licensure; Direct the Executive Director/CEO to participate as project manager in the development of the details of the framework; and Authorize the President to support the vision and principles for the development of a National Framework for Membership and Licensure, as may be amended, at the meeting of Engineers Canada’s constituent members in May 2009.

27 27 The Vision - A dynamic National Framework for Membership and Licensure where: All individuals engaged in engineering activities can become members of the profession and participate in its governance; All engineering practitioners are able to fully utilize their training, experience and expertise; All members practising engineering are licensed according to their competencies and are held publicly accountable for their work and conduct; Engineering activities, services and products are effectively regulated; All members and licence holders enjoy full mobility across Canada; In addition the framework will: Create a platform for global mobility Operate in all jurisdictions Facilitate the convergence of provincial legislation Build public confidence in the regulation of engineering Promote renewal of the profession

28 28 Principles - National Framework for Membership and Licensure To uphold and protect the public interest: 1.Regulate engineering activities, products and services; 2.Prescribe uniform membership and licensing requirements; 3.Ensure that registration practices are transparent, objective, impartial and fair; 4.Provide flexible paths for registered members to gain licences, specializations and designations that recognize their competencies;

29 29 Principles - National Framework for Membership and Licensure (continued) 5. Provide full national mobility for all members and licences; 6. Proactively address overlaps with other professions; 7. Build a platform for global mobility; 8. Simplify legislation; 9. Build, enhance and communicate pride in the profession; 10. Serve the public, members and licence holders in a relevant, efficient, effective and non-bureaucratic manner.

30 A Working Model Consistent with the above principles

31 Membership Based on academic credentials and good character, Engineering Grads Engineering Students and remain members. Engineering Educated Intern Licence Collaborator Licence Specialists & Designations Professional Licence The Engineering Profession Non-Practicing Licensees Voluntarily join the profession

32 Intern Licence Collaborator Licence Specific Scope Licence The Engineering Profession Non-Practicing Licensees Specialists & Designations Interested in practice engineering Apply for a license Engineering Related Training B.Tech. Graduates Applied Science Grads Licensed Applied Science Professionals Technologists

33 Membership Based on academic credentials and good character, Engineering Grads Engineering Students and remain members. Engineering Educated Intern Licence Collaborator Licence Specialists & Designations Professional Licence Specific Scope Licence The Engineering Profession Non-Practicing Licensees Organizations Providing Engineering Services Voluntarily join the profession Specialists & Designations Interested in practice engineering Apply for a license Engineering Team Members B.Tech. Graduates Applied Science Grads Licensed Applied Science Professionals Technologists

34 34 Implementation Overview Phase I Agree on the “ground rules” to resolve differences Develop processes/details for the framework Lever the Agreement on Internal Trade (AIT) to engage governments National Framework for Membership and Licensure Construct a road map to work within our provincial constraints and move to the National Framework for Membership and Licensure Phase II Develop the licenses to able us to regulate all engineering activities, products and services Model clauses for legislation Provide full mobility for these licenses Phase III Inclusively of all in the profession Promotion of the profession

35 35 Stakeholders benefiting from the National Framework for Membership and Licensure The Public Federal government All Provincial & Territorial governments Employers of Engineers Members Canadian Engineering Graduates International Engineering Graduates Engineering Students Canadian Engineering Schools Holders of professional licences Applied Science Grads, B.Tech Grads, Licensed Professionals & Technologist Applied Science Grads, B.Tech Grads, Licensed Professionals & Technologist The Profession

36 36 HRSDC approved $130K funding for Engineers Canada to: Eliminate the need for the inter-association mobility agreement; Allow for the seamless mobility of all classifications of engineering licensure and registration to address the needs of the Agreement on Internal Trade; Develop a comprehensive licensing model that could form the basis of legislative changes in the Provinces and Territories to reduce differences in approaches; Gain a clear understanding of the EU member states’ methods of recognizing engineers; Provide clearer, more accessible access to registration for all engineering graduates

37 37 "the status quo shall remain the same" "the status quo shall remain the same" Yogi Berra... must have been a bureaucrat!

38 Advice, Feedback & Questions

39 39 Benefits for the Public Public health, safety and welfare are protected, Assurance that engineers are competent and accountable for the work they do, Access to talented workforce, Framework for innovation, Profession committed to developing of the next generation of engineers, and High-level of professionalism.

40 40 Benefits for Provincial Governments Consumer protection, Resources to support the Innovation Agenda Full utilization of International Engineering Grads, Role model in compliance with AIT, Provincial regulator operating with the best practices, Model for other regulated professions, Labour force planning, development and data, Means to create Public Interest Specialists, and Partner to resolve problems, including expertise engineering-public policy issues.

41 41 Benefits for the Federal Government Full mobility across Canada and around the world, Full utilization of International Engineering Grads Labour force planning, development and data, Engineering workforce are the national competitive advantage in the knowledge economy, Support for the innovation agenda, Ability to interact with the profession as a whole Only the required level of regulation Reduced labour market frictions Assurance of quality work and expertise Uniform national standards Orderly administration of technical classifications Model for other professions

42 42 Benefits for Employers Professional and accountable workforce, Transparent recruitment practices, Clarity of credential recognition Skills development opportunities for internship and life long learning, Ease of exporting services nationally and internationally, Labour force data, and Access to a greater talent pool of licence holders.

43 43 Benefits for Members A welcoming, engaging and inclusive profession, Extensive network of fellow professionals, Participation in the governance of the profession, Professional recognition, Enhanced employability and opportunities for career advancement, Meeting client expectations, Opportunity to increase earnings, Full inter-provincial mobility Supporting national initiatives, and Access to affinity programs

44 44 Benefits for Canadian Engineering Graduates Early access to membership benefits, Ongoing engagement with the profession, Recognition of credentials by employers, Support from the regulator on the path to licensure, and Recognition of ongoing progress.

45 45 Benefits for International Engineering Graduates Early access to membership benefits, Credential recognition by employers, Swifter integration into the workforce, Support from the regulator, Guidance to the membership category that matches their credentials; Full recognition of competencies and credentials that may help in meeting registration/licensing requirements; Flexible paths to gain licenses, specializations and designations; Ability to work with a collaborator to gain knowledge of Canadian codes and standards, and Recognition of ongoing progress.

46 46 Benefits for Engineering Students Early and ongoing membership and engagement with the profession, Seamless transition to licensure, Monitoring of work experience, Industry contacts for capstone project, Support for student activities, Recognition of credentials by employers, and Recognition of ongoing progress.

47 47 Benefits for Engineering Schools Strengthened ties with the profession Linkages to industry Enhanced professionalism Greater student engagement Labour supply data for enrolment planning Graduate career patterns 75% intend to pursue engineering careers 11% graduate studies Recognition of emerging disciplines

48 48 Benefits for Professional Licence Holders Full inter-provincial mobility Ongoing access to membership benefits, Flexible paths to gain: Specializations Designations Ability to hold a certificate of authorization to offer services to the public.

49 49 Benefits for - Applied Science Grads, B.Tech Grads, Licensed Professionals & Technologist Membership and engagement with the profession, Full inter-provincial mobility Full application of technical training in the practice of engineering, Increased value as a member of the engineering team, Recognition of engineering competencies, Opportunity to progress to a full licence, and Ability to independently practice engineering within specific scope and offer those services to the public.

50 50 Benefits for the Profession Expanded and diverse membership, Public leadership, Flexibility to meet tomorrow’s challenges Renewal, Framework that addresses today’s needs, Public recognition, More influence, Legislation to support the framework, Able to speak as the Canadian profession


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