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Middletown Public Schools A Closer Look at the CCSS (Common Core State Standards) Professional Development February 17, 2012.

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Presentation on theme: "Middletown Public Schools A Closer Look at the CCSS (Common Core State Standards) Professional Development February 17, 2012."— Presentation transcript:

1 Middletown Public Schools A Closer Look at the CCSS (Common Core State Standards) Professional Development February 17, 2012

2 Agenda  Overview of the CCSS  Exploring the CCSS  Learning Progressions  Lunch  Debriefing  Middletown’s Transition Plan?  Grade Level Discussions  Final Remarks

3 Did You Know? source: alpineschools.org

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5 Education in the 21st Century

6 SKILLS FOR THE 21 ST CENTURY Think Critically, Analytically, and Innovatively Solve Problems Work Collaboratively in Teams Appreciate Diversity Possess Creativity & Ingenuity Willing to Go the Extra Mile

7 What are the CCSS? A shared set of clear educational standards that define what students should know and be able to do at every level of schooling in LA and mathematics to ensure that students who graduate from high school are prepared to succeed in college and careers in a shifting global economy and society. Source: CCSSI, 2010a.

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9 Guiding Principles of Development Clear-Consistent-Rigorous-Relevant Source: cctmath.org

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11 WE ARE ALL TEACHERS OF READING, WRITING, SPEAKING AND LISTENING, AND LANGUAGE

12 The ELA standards insist that instruction in reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language be a shared responsibility within the school. This interdisciplinary approach to literacy is based on extensive research establishing the need for college-and career-ready students to be proficient in reading complex informational text independently in a variety of content areas.

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14  Students must have knowledge of domain- specific vocabulary.  By senior year of high school, the ELA standards indicate that 70% of the sum of student reading across the grades should be informational text.  The ability to write logical arguments based on substantive claims, sound reasoning and relevant evidence is a cornerstone of the Writing standards.

15  Research-both short, focused projects and longer-term, in-depth, inquiry research- is emphasized throughout the standards.  The standards emphasize effective communication practices.  The standards require that students gain, evaluate, and present increasingly complex information, ideas, and evidence through listening and speaking as well as through media.

16  An important focus of the Speaking and Listening standards is academic discussion in one-on-one, small-group and whole-class settings. Formal presentations are one important way such talk occurs, but so is the more informal discussion that takes place as students collaborate to answer questions, build understanding and solve problems.  Media and technology are integrated throughout the standards.

17 Exploring the Standards  "If you try to introduce people to a paradigm shift, they will hear what you have to say and then interpret your words in terms of their old paradigm. What does not fit, they will not hear.  Therefore, a change in paradigm cannot be brought about by talking. People have to experience the change, or at a minimum see other people experiencing it, before they will begin to understand what you are saying." (Myron Tribus )

18  CMT and CAPT will remain in place for accountability purposes through  Connecticut is applying for an NCLB waiver.  School year , SMARTER Balanced Assessment Consortium (SBAC) assessment system operational for students in Grades 3-8 and 11. Source: Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium

19 Next Generation Assessments More rigorous tests measuring student progress toward “college and career readiness” Have common, comparable scores across member states, and across consortia Provide achievement and growth information to help make better educational decisions and professional development opportunities Assess all students, except those with “significant cognitive disabilities” Administer online, with timely results Use multiple measures Source: Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 68 / Friday, April 9, 2010 pp

20 Draft Assessment Claims for English Language Arts/Literacy “Students can read closely and critically to comprehend a range of increasingly complex literary and informational texts.” Reading “Students can produce effective writing for a range of purposes and audiences.” Writing “Students can employ effective speaking and listening skills for a range of purposes and audiences.” Speaking/Listening “Students can engage appropriately in collaborative and independent inquiry to investigate/research topics, pose questions, and gather and present information.” Research/Inquiry “Students can skillfully use and interpret written language across a range of literacy tasks.” Language Use (a/o Round 2 – released 9/20/11) Source: Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium

21 Summative Assessment (Computer Adaptive) Assesses the full range of Common Core in English language arts and mathematics for students in grades 3–8 and 11 (interim assessments can be used in grades 9 and 10) Measures current student achievement and growth across time, showing progress toward college and career readiness Can be given once or twice a year (mandatory testing window within the last 12 weeks of the instructional year) Includes a variety of question types: selected response, short constructed response, extended constructed response, technology enhanced, and performance tasks

22 Assessment System Components Interim Assessment (Computer Adaptive) Optional comprehensive and content-cluster assessment to help identify specific needs of each student Can be administered throughout the year Provides clear examples of expected performance on Common Core standards Includes a variety of question types: selected response, short constructed response, extended constructed response, technology enhanced, and performance tasks Aligned to and reported on the same scale as the summative assessments Fully accessible for instruction and professional development Source: Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium

23 How CAT Works (Binet’s Test) Source: Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium

24 Psychological Issues  CAT equalizes the psychological environment of the test across ability levels.  High-ability students will get about 50% correct.  Low-ability students will get about 50% correct. Source: Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium

25 LEARNING PROGRESSIONS

26 Learning Progressions and Differentiation The concept of learning progressions offers one promising approach to developing the knowledge needed to define the “track” students may be on, or should be on. Learning progressions can inform teachers about what to expect from their students. They provide an empirical basis for choices about when to teach what to whom. Consortium for Policy Research in Education, 2011, p.12

27  The Learning Progressions within the ELA Common core standards provide an architectural framework that enables teachers to keep learning moving as students demonstrate increasing expertise in the four strands of significant literacy concepts and skills.

28  Knowing how the standards develop vertically from grade to grade and across strands enables teachers to know what to teach next or where to circle back to bring students forward.

29  Teachers can use concepts and skills along the Learning Progressions to support student acceleration through the learning progression to enhance, extend, and enrich learning for students who already demonstrate proficiency in the grade- specific standards.

30  The skilled practitioner using formative assessment practices can determine where and when learning breaks down for individual students, and design instructional adjustments that support getting students back on track for learning within and across grade-level spans.

31 Making the Shift  What’s New, What’s Old, What Can Go?  What is Most Important?  What is Doable?

32 Making the Shift - Suggestions  Responding to Complex Text Independently  Analyze two or more texts  Research Writing  Argument Writing  Collaborative Conversation  Oral and Media Presentations  Analysis of Content  Write Routinely

33 GRADE 3 READINGInstructionReteachWRITING 1. How Characters Change.25 days 5 days1. Memoir 2. Linking Ideas with Information in Nonfiction 30 days 4 days 2. “ How To ” and Informational Text 3. Messages and Meaning in Narrative Text30 days 4 days3. Narrative Texts: Folktales, Fables and Myths 4. Author ’ s Message in Nonfiction Text 30 days 4 days4. Persuading Readers in Writing 5. Author ’ s Craft: Examining Language in Fiction 20 days 3 days5. Poetry and Powerful Language 6. Author ’ s Craft: Examining Language in Nonfiction 20 days 5 days6.Researching and Presenting Ideas

34 Middletown Public Schools English Language Arts Unit Planning Organizer TopicGrade Unit Title Pacing Essential Question Big Idea Priority and Supporting Common Core State Standards Bold Standards are Priority Explanations and Examples Concepts What Students Need to Know Skills What Students Need to Be Able to Do Bloom ’ s Taxonomy Levels Learning Progressions Unit Assessments Common Formative Assessments Informal Progress Monitoring Checks

35 Priority and Supporting CCSS Reading CC. 4.R.L.1 * Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. CC. 4.R.L.3 Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character ’ s thoughts, words, or actions). CC. 4.R.L.5 Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems (e.g., verse, rhythm, meter) and drama (e.g., casts of characters, settings, descriptions, dialogue, stage directions) when writing or speaking about a text. CC. 4.R.L.7 Make connections between the text of a story or drama and a visual or oral presentation of the text, identifying where each version reflects specific descriptions and directions in the text. Language CC.4.L.5.a Explain the meaning of simple similes and metaphors (e.g., as pretty as a picture) in context. as pretty as a picture) in context. Foundational CC.4.R.F.4b Read on-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings. Overarching Standards (OS) Reading CC.4.R.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, in the grades 4 – 5 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. CC.4.RI.10 By the end of year, read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, in the grades 4 – 5 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. Speaking and Listening CC.4.SL.1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher led) with diverse partners on grade 4 topics and texts, building on others ’ ideas and expressing their own clearly. Foundational Skills CC.4.R.F.3 Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words. CC.4.R.F.4 Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension. Subject(s)Reading Language Arts Grade/Course3 Unit of StudyUnit 5: A Closer Look at Story Elements and Structure in Multiple Genres (Correlates with Unit 5 Writing – Performance, Poetry, and Drama) Unit Type(s) ❑ Topical ❑ Skills-based ❑ Thematic Pacing24 days (20 days instruction; 4 days reteaching/enrichment) Connecticut Curriculum Design Unit Planning Organizer

36 Grade Level/Content Area Breakout Groups Review the Language Arts Common Core State Standards and Appendix B and C for your grade level or content area.  Highlight the standards that you already address.  Circle the standards that are not covered in your current curriculum. As a grade level or content area, what would be your plan for implementing some or all of these Language Arts standards during the school year? Consider: What standards would have the greatest impact on instruction, what can be integrated with what you are already doing and what you may be able to eliminate from your current standards.

37 Middletown’s 20 Mile March  In 2006, 46.7% of 3 rd grade students were at GOAL in reading…  In 2011, 54.4% of 3 rd grade students were at GOAL in reading. 7.7 point increase of students achieving GOAL

38 Middletown’s 20 Mile March  In 2006, 55.8% of 4 th grade students were at GOAL in reading…  In 2011, 60.1% of 4 th grade students were at GOAL in reading. 4.3 point increase of students achieving GOAL

39 Middletown’s 20 Mile March  In 2006, 46.3% of 5 th grade students were at GOAL in reading…  In 2011, 56.2% of 5 th grade students were at GOAL in reading. 9.9 point increase of students achieving GOAL

40 Middletown’s 20 Mile March  In 2006, 48.5% of 6 th grade students were at GOAL in reading…  In 2011, 65.5% of 6 th grade students were at GOAL in reading. 17 point increase of students achieving GOAL

41 Middletown’s 20 Mile March  In 2006, 51.2% of 7 th grade students were at GOAL in reading…  In 2011, 70.1% of 7 th grade students were at GOAL in reading point increase of students achieving GOAL

42 Middletown’s 20 Mile March  In 2006, 43.2% of 8 th grade students were at GOAL in reading…  In 2011, 70.7% of 8 th grade students were at GOAL in reading point increase of students achieving GOAL

43 Middletown’s 20 Mile March  In 2006, 42% of Middletown’s Black population were PROFICIENT in reading…  In 2011, 61% of Middletown’s Black population were PROFICIENT in reading. 19 point increase of students achieving PROFICIENCY

44 Middletown’s 20 Mile March  In 2006, 15% of Middletown’s Special Education population were PROFICIENT in reading…  In 2011, 34% of Middletown’s Special Education population were PROFICIENT in reading. 19 point increase of students achieving PROFICIENCY

45 Middletown’s 20 Mile March  In 2006, 44% of Middletown’s students receiving free and reduced lunch were PROFICIENT in reading…  In 2011, 63% of Middletown’s students receiving free and reduced lunch were PROFICIENT in reading. 19 point increase of students achieving PROFICIENCY

46 Middletown’s 20 Mile March  In 2006, 46.7% of 3 rd grade students were at GOAL in reading…  In 2011, this same cohort of students scored 70.7% at GOAL in reading in 8 th grade. 24 point increase of students achieving GOAL!


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