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Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) Reauthorized 2001 Public Law 107-110 No Child Left Behind.

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Presentation on theme: "Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) Reauthorized 2001 Public Law 107-110 No Child Left Behind."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) Reauthorized 2001 Public Law No Child Left Behind

3 History  First passed in 1965 and signed by President Lyndon Johnson.  First legislative involvement by the Federal Government in elementary and secondary public education.  Is re-authorized every 5 – 6 years.

4 Why Am I Hearing About ESEA Now?  This re-authorization is radically different from any previous changes  It’s going to affect all of us 

5 The Bill Passed  381 to 41 in the House  87 to 10 in the Senate

6 Three Areas of Consideration  Testing and Accountability and Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP)  Teacher and Paraprofessional Quality  Funding

7 H.R. 1 – No Child Left Behind Act Testing Criteria Requirements Be the same for all children Be aligned with state standards and provide coherent information about student attainment Performance = Basic, Proficient, and Advanced Be valid, reliable, and consistent with technical standards Involve multiple measures of achievement including higher order thinking skills and understanding Provide reasonable adaptations and accommodations for children with disabilities Annual English proficiency assessment for all LEP students NAEP: Biennially/ grades 4 & 8 only/ 1000 students per state/ reading and mathematics/ 90 minute assessment/ Only if USDE pays cost of administration

8 H.R. 1 – No Child Left Behind Act State Testing Requirements Beginning School Year Annual testing in one grade within three levels; 3-5, 6-9 and in reading and mathematics Beginning School Year Annual English proficiency assessment for all LEP students Beginning School Year Participation in NAEP required in grades 4 and 8 in reading and mathematics Beginning School Year 2005 – 2006 Annual testing in Grades 3-8 in reading and mathematics (and HS year; 10 th ) Beginning School Year 2007 – 2008 Annual testing in one grade within three levels, 3-5, 6-9, and in science Additional Indicators Required Graduation rate for secondary, state selects elementary/middle indicator(s)

9 Alternative Assessments States must measure all student performance against the state’s grade level standards Commercially Available Tests No Longer Permitted Special Education students are assessed using: –WASL –WASL with Accomodations –Portfolio Alternate Assessment Out-of-grade level testing prohibited 1% limitation allowed taking alternative assessments against an alternate set of standards (WA presently.2%)

10 All students “proficient” within 12 years Separate, measurable goals in reading and mathematics. (State Uniform Bars) Must measure reading/language arts and mathematics separately. Must provide separate, measurable objectives/ disaggregated data and goals for: All Children Racial/Ethnic Groups Disadvantaged (Poverty) Disabled LEP NCLB Adequate Yearly Progress Elements

11 OTHER NCLB AYP ELEMENTS School is making AYP if there is a 10 percent gain in each group reaching proficiency; “Safe Harbor” Must include at least one other indicator: –Graduation rates, for high schools –1 academic indicator, for elementary/middle schools 95% of students in each group must be tested. Determination of “personally identifiable” and “statistically reliable” number(s) –Personally identifiable = 10 –Statistical reliable = 30 (Proposed)

12 Disaggregated Data Forces a “Closer Look”

13 The 37 Cells of School Improvement ReadingMath 95% R M Grad. Rate Attendance K - 8 All Students Asian Black Hispanic Native American White Bilingual Disabled Disadvantaged

14 Other Indicator: Elementary/Middle Schools / K-8 Attendance – Definition of an unexcused absence: Failure to meet the district’s policy for excused absences – RCW 28A defines unexcused absence : Failure to attend the majority of hours or periods in an average school day or failure to comply with a more restrictive school district’s policy for excused absences. The rate for AYP purposes is calculated as follows: – Total number of student days of unexcused absences in the year – Average monthly headcount X number of student days in the school year –AYP will be met if a school/district attains an unexcused absence rate of 1 percent or less. Schools/districts with unexcused absence rates greater than 1 percent must show a reduction from the prior year to meet AYP.

15 Other Required Indicator: High Schools NCLB defines graduation rate as: –“The percentage of students who graduate from secondary schools with a regular diploma in the standard number of years.” Final regulations describe regular diploma as: –“Not including an alternative degree that is not fully aligned with the State’s academic standards, such as a certificate or a GED.” Calculation of the Graduation Rate –Cohort analysis required –Cohort begins in Grade 9 –Graduation rate calculated after 4 years of high school

16 Other Indicator: High Schools / 9-12 Calculation of the Graduation Rate –Cohort begins in Grade 9 – Identify “Expected Year of Graduation” –Graduation rate calculated after 4 years of high school –Washington State will utilize an “extended cohort analysis” –Students who successfully obtain a diploma after their cohort year, will be “added” with the cohort graduation rate for each high school. Graduation Rate Threshold Set at 85% for 2014 For purposes of AYP (other than “safe harbor”) the calculation of the graduation rate will apply to the school building and district level, but not to the student subgroup level. School buildings and districts that achieve or exceed the state cohort average (73%) for the graduation rate, as well as those that are below the threshold but improve their graduation rate when compared to the previous year, will have met the other indicator for purposes of calculating AYP A+ Commission Meeting 1/13/03

17 Definition of a Graduate Student who receives a regular high school diploma “Standard number of years” GED is NOT a regular high school diploma IEP diploma is NOT a regular diploma Continuing students / Extended Cohort Measure Adult high school diploma Definition of a Dropout Student who leaves high school without a regular high school diploma and does not transfer to another school GED test-takers (WAC ) –Students in GED preparation not necessarily dropouts –GED recipients may re-enter if under 21 and have not met graduation requirements “Unknown” status

18 Full Academic Year Requirement Full academic year = October 1 st –all students whose enrollment is continuous and uninterrupted on or before October 1 st in the school year the assessment is administered Beginning Fall 2003 Determines which students are to be included in decisions about Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP). Applies To: –Enrolled Full Academic Year in School –Enrolled Full Academic Year in District –Enrolled Full Academic Year in State

19 Reason(s) for School Improvement Identification 37 Possible Cells – Any cell / 2 years not making AYP = School Improvement Identify reason(s) for school improvement identification (individual cells) prior to identification of school Proposed SAME cell – 2 years not making AYP = School Improvement Federal Peer Review 3/6/03 Submitted 3/31/03 – 2 years not making AYP in SAME content area = School Improvement

20 Standard Error of Proportion (SEP) Conceptually the same as a “confidence interval” or “margin of error” Size of the SEP depends on the number of students in the group and the percentage of students meeting standard Every category of students has its own SEP (no “ set ” range) The fewer the number of students in a cell, the larger the SEP Set at the 95% confidence level (only 5% chance of making an incorrect determination)

21 Adequate Yearly Progress Starting Point: Assessment Data Defining AYP: –Rank all schools in the state by % proficient –Then, count up to reach the school at 20% of total enrollment –The % of students proficient in that school is the possible starting point ALSO –Rank the proficient level of each demographic subgroup –The % of students proficient in the lowest-achieving group is the possible starting point Required to choose the higher of the two as the starting point No Child Left Behind

22 Calculating State Uniform Bars State Uniform Bars for: –4 th Grade Reading and Mathematics –7 th Grade Reading and Mathematics –10 th Grade Reading and Mathematics State Uniform Bars Using 20 th Percentile Schools 3-year average –Different schools for each of 1999 – – – 2002

23 GRADE 4 STATE UNIFORM BAR BASELINE CALCULATED USING 3-YEAR AVERAGE 20 th PERCENTILE ( )

24 GRADE 7 STATE UNIFORM BAR BASELINE CALCULATED USING 3-YEAR AVERAGE 20 th PERCENTILE ( )

25 GRADE 10 STATE UNIFORM BAR BASELINE CALCULATED USING 3-YEAR AVERAGE 20 th PERCENTILE ( )

26 Safe Harbor If students in a subgroup make a 10 percent reduction in the number of students not proficient, they are in a “safe harbor” and not considered as failing AYP. Example: (Group A = 100 students) Group A 60 percent not proficient 40 percent are proficient 10 percent of 60 = gain 6 additional students in that group must meet proficiency However, ALL subgroups must meet safe harbor or better –All Students– Limited English Proficiency –Racial/ethnic groups– Students with disabilities – Economically disadvantaged AND must meet other indicator No Child Left Behind

27 2002 Adequate Yearly Progress “Results” “Governor” Elementary School Large urban K-5 school > 50% low-income, > 40% minority Category Reading Percent Proficient Math Percent Proficient Reading Percent Assessed Math Percent Assessed Unexcused Absence Rate All students % 0.3% Amer. Indian———— Asian/Pac. Is % Black % Hispanic———— White % Disabled % LEP % Low SES % State Target % 1.0% Result: Did not make AYP because 1 cell (special ed. students in reading) did not meet the state target

28 “Making It”

29 In , Washington has 50 schools in school improvement. 37 schools in Step 1 13 schools in Step 2

30 AYP TIMELINE

31 School Improvement Step Requirements Schools are identified as in need of school improvement after two consecutive years of not meeting Adequate Yearly Progress Schools that have not met achievement goals for two consecutive years (Step 1): –must develop an improvement plan and receive technical assistance –10 % of funding must be dedicated to professional development –must notify parents of school improvement status –must make public school choice available within district; district paying transportation costs. Schools that have not met achievement goals for three consecutive years (Step 2): All components above required, plus: –must provide supplemental services approved by the SEA (OSPI) No Child Left Behind

32 School Improvement Step Requirements Schools are identified as in need of school improvement after two consecutive years of not meeting Adequate Yearly Progress Schools that have not met achievement goals for two consecutive years (Step 1): –must develop an improvement plan and receive technical assistance –10 % of funding must be dedicated to professional development –must notify parents of school improvement status –must make public school choice available within district; district paying transportation costs. Schools that have not met achievement goals for three consecutive years (Step 2): All components above required, plus: –must provide supplemental services approved by the SEA (OSPI) No Child Left Behind

33 School Improvement Step Requirements Schools that have not met achievement goals for four years (Step 3): –must take corrective action. District action – new staff or curriculum –must continue: development on improvement plan and receive technical assistance 10 % of funding must be dedicated to professional development must notify parents of school improvement status must make public school choice available within district; district paying transportation costs. supplemental services Schools that have not met achievement goals for five years (Step 4): –required restructuring –plan developed for take over – state, contractor, charter school, new staff –must continue supplemental services and public school choice. No Child Left Behind

34 Public School Choice Final Regulation Clarification LEA (District) must give priority to the lowest achieving children from low-income families Determine family income on the same basis that the LEA (District) uses to make allocations to schools Students assigned to a school by a juvenile court due to violent or criminal behavior, or disciplinary reasons sufficiently serious to justify placement in a particular learning environment, may be denied the choice option

35 Supplemental Services Required after three years (and beyond) “Eligible” child = low income Includes tutoring or other extra educational services Supplemental services approved by the SEA: –Annual notice to potential providers; profit/nonprofit / religiously- affiliated –Criteria established by the SEA –SEA produces a list of approved programs/providers Parent selects / LEA contracts with provider – performance goals set – requires contact with child’s teacher 20% cap of total LEA allocation for transportation AND supplemental services - 5% transportation - 5% supplemental services Additional 10% either – LEA choice No Child Left Behind

36 School Choice and Supplemental Services Final Regulation Clarification State class size reduction law does not supercede choice Prohibits “lack of capacity” to deny students transfer under public school choice, however, health and safety concerns may be taken into account Requires parents to have a choice of more than one school for transfer if available Requires parent preference “to be taken into account” Notice of supplemental educational services must be provided to parents with a list of approved service providers available within the LEA, including technology- based or distance-learning

37 Corrective Action Required after four years (and beyond) Must Choose One of the Following: Replace relevant school staff New curriculum for all core content areas Significantly decrease management authority at the school Appoint an outside expert Extend the school day or year Restructure internal organization No Child Left Behind

38 Restructuring Required five years (and beyond) Must Choose One of the Following: Reopen as a charter Replace all or most relevant school staff, including the principal Contract with private management State take over Any other major restructuring No Child Left Behind

39 LEA Improvement SEA identifies LEA in need of improvement after 2 years of not making AYP Improvement plan required within 3 months 10% of allocated funding must be used for professional development Technical assistance required including corrective action Corrective Action SEA must choose one: Deferring programmatic or reducing administrative funds New curriculum Restructuring or abolishing the LEA Replacing relevant LEA personnel Alternative governance State receivership/trustee Authorizing students to transfer to another LEA

40 Highly Qualified Teachers All teachers teaching CORE Academic Subjects must be “highly qualified” by CORE Academic Subjects means English, Reading, Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Foreign Languages, Civics and Government, Economics, Arts, History, and Geography Highly Qualified means: Full State Certification or passed teacher licensing exam and hold a license to teach Certification or licensure requirements has not been waived on an emergency, temporary, or provisional basis

41 Highly Qualified Teachers Existing Teachers: Bachelor’s Degree Full State Teaching Certification Demonstrate Competence –hold National Board certification in the core academic subject(s) assigned to teach, OR –be endorsed in the core academic subject(s) assigned to teach, OR –for unendorsed certificate holders, have a degree, major, or the equivalent of a major in the core academic subject(s) assigned to teach OR –have a satisfactory evaluation based upon a uniform State standard of evaluation. (Washington in RCW 28A (1-5), RCW through , , , RCW 28A and WAC (1-7) OR –demonstrate competency through the same avenue for new teachers

42 Highly Qualified Teachers New Teachers: Bachelor’s Degree Elementary: Pass a basic skills competency assessment as well as demonstrated competence in areas of reading, mathematics and writing and other areas of elementary curriculum Secondary: Pass a basic skills competency assessment as well as demonstrated competence in academic subjects in which the teacher teaches (endorsements) Full State Teaching Certification

43 Qualified Paraprofessionals Title I paraprofessional requirements: –a high school diploma or equivalent –completed at least two years of college, OR –obtained an associates (or higher) degree, OR –successfully pass a state or local academic assessment of mathematics, reading, and writing. State or local assessment must measure rigorous standards of quality that demonstrates (a) knowledge of, and the ability to assist in instructing, reading, writing and mathematics; OR (b) knowledge of, and the ability to assist in instructing, reading readiness, writing readiness, and mathematics readiness, as appropriate.

44 “Qualified Paraprofessional” Criteria Applies to: Title I paraprofessionals assisting with student instruction, including those “teaching in a program supported with Title I (Part A) funds” Title I paraprofessionals hired after January 8, 2002 must meet requirements upon hiring. Existing paraprofessionals must meet qualifications by January 8, 2006 EXCEPTION: paraprofessionals who serve primarily as translators, or whose duties consist solely of conducting parental involvement activities. No Child Left Behind

45 Parents Right to Know Requires LEA’s to annually notify parents of their right to request information on the professional qualifications of their child’s teachers. –Licensing and certification for grade level and subject –Emergency or other provisional status –B.A. major and graduate degrees –Paraprofessionals and qualifications (if serving the child) Requires LEA’s to notify parents if students have a teacher for 4 weeks that is not “highly qualified.” No Child Left Behind

46 LEA Progress on Improving Qualifications If the district has failed to make progress after two years: –the district must develop an improvement plan. –the SEA must provide technical assistance to districts. If progress is not made after three consecutive years: –The state must work with the LEA to develop such a plan. –Prohibit the use of Title I funds to fund additional paraprofessionals. (Exception for replacing existing paraprofessionals) –LEA must enter into an agreement with the SEA on the use of funds provided directly to a school or schools for the teachers and principals for professional development activities. No Child Left Behind

47 And What About the Funding?  ESEA sets specified authorization levels for Title I to put it on a ten-year path to full funding:  FY 02 = $13.5 billion  FY 03 = $16 billion  FY 04 = $18.5 billion  FY 05 = $20.5 billion  FY 06= $22.75 billion  FY 07 = $25 billion

48 Unfunded Mandates? Authorized FY ’02 $13.5 FY ‘03$16 FY ’04$18.5 Appropriated $10.35 $11.68 * $12.35 (Bush proposal)

49 NEA PRIORITIES FOR ESEA

50 NEA supports full funding for all federal ESEA requirements at authorized levels in order to meet the achievement goals of the new law.

51 NEA supports limiting the definition of “highly qualified teacher” to include only those teachers who have achieved full licensure/certification under state standards

52 NEA supports granting states total flexibility in measuring schools’ Adequate Yearly Progress

53 NEA supports granting states total flexibility in apply sanctions to schools identified as in need of improvement

54 NEA supports ensuring paraprofessionals the training they need to meet new quality standards by requiring states and local school districts to full fund the costs, using federal Title I funds and other funding sources.

55 WEA GOALS AND STRATEGIES FOR ESEA

56 Modify the definition of AYP (adequate yearly progress to include realistic, achievable standards and to preserve our state accountability system.

57 Seek full federal funding of ESEA. Eliminate any unfunded ESEA mandates.

58 Diminish the reliance and emphasis on standardized testing and promote other indicators of student achievement.

59 Maintain existing Washington state education reform efforts and block the potential punitive sanctions in ESEA.

60 Maintain and strengthen school employee rights and protections and prevent standardized student assessment results from being used to evaluate the performance of individual school employees.

61 Organize WEA members and allies around the opportunities, problems and deadlines within ESEA.

62 What Can You Do?  Education  Dissemination of information  Training  Advocacy  Organizing  Lobbying/Political Action  Spread the message


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