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NCLB and Media Programs Maryalicea/Sites/Anderson/Anderson.html Mary Alice Anderson Lead Media Specialist, Winona Public Schools.

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Presentation on theme: "NCLB and Media Programs Maryalicea/Sites/Anderson/Anderson.html Mary Alice Anderson Lead Media Specialist, Winona Public Schools."— Presentation transcript:

1 NCLB and Media Programs Maryalicea/Sites/Anderson/Anderson.html Mary Alice Anderson Lead Media Specialist, Winona Public Schools Online Instructor, University of Wisconsin-Stout Columnist, Multimedia &

2 Sound familiar? My friend Doris said the principal told her she couldn’t do any more fun stuff. Online testing will tie up the media center labs for 12 full days in our district. We need more books at the 2nd grade level for our 5th grade boys. I have everything I need in my classroom.

3 Session topics Things to know Questions to ask Practical things you can do now Ideas for turning negatives into positives

4 Things to know

5 The law Current definition places media specialists in non-classroom categories –Work within that realm –Stop whining –Carve out relevant tasks since the law doesn’t spell them out There are implicit rules you can read into the legislation

6 Some mention of media centers Section 1202 and 1251 Subpart 1 –Resources for Literacy, Learning and Teaching, -- student reading skills Improvement grants ( Reading First) –Promoting reading and library programs that provide access to engaging reading materials Subpart 4 –Improving literacy through school libraries grants ( Ed Tech, 21st Century Learning Centers

7 Standards Media specialists need to know the content standards so that when we collaborate with classroom teachers, two heads will be looking for ways to create a learning environment to meet those standards

8 Standards National and state standards –Content –Information and technology literacy Local standards and curriculum –Recent and ongoing changes –Alignment with information and technology literacy curriculum

9 Standards alignment

10 Others do notice and care Teachers at all levels should be provided adequate resources, including a fully funded and staffed media center, and encouraged to use their expertise to address the diverse needs of students. Support professional development opportunities between school librarians and classroom teachers to advance our students’ reading, writing, and information literacy... NEA & NCTE resolutions

11 ICT Literacy Assessment Comprehensive test, 75 minute Audience: college students, appropriate for h.s. seniors Uses scenarios to test 7 proficiencies including critical thinking Short demo:

12 Resources Check with your administrator! Free aaslnclbbrochure.htm aaslnclbbrochure.htm Sent to 78,000 elementary & middle school principals Purchase in packs of 25 for $8.00

13 Questions to ask

14 Questions What’s my role? Are our students technology literate? How can the media program survive? What do teachers & administrators expect? How can we be effective & move beyond the tunnel vision of teaching to the test?

15 More questions How can I make the media center materials more accessible & better aligned with curriculum and needs? What data should I be collecting? How can I use data to make a difference? Is our information & technology literacy curriculum aligned with state/local content standards? Do kids who test more achieve more?

16 Things to do

17 Think Big Picture Step out of your normal role Observe from a different perspective –What are the stresses, situations administrators and teachers face on a daily basis? –What do parents & the community see?

18 Data Talk the language of educator leaders Become proficient with Excel –I wish I knew how to use Excel so I could filter data! Know how to access state & local data Show others how to access, filter data Become part of a data team Research Source: Learning Point Assoc.

19 Data retreat District team, Summer 2005 –Understanding, accessing data Hypothesis Our district is not using data consistently to improve student achievement

20 Planning for our workshop

21 Planning, implementing Apply for grant -- after school sessions Develop staff development materials Access state data Build own spreadsheet Discuss, plan for improvement

22 Sample

23 Challenger Elementary Not meeting AYP Studied NWEA test data Scores jumped 10-18% in some levels Increased collaboration We went from a culture that didn’t really know what data was to having teachers anxious to look at their test data & how best to group students... (You’ve Got DATA. Multimedia & Nov/Dec 2005)

24 Fluency example: Rochester,MN Pair reading/observing Individual recording Graphs Show them how to take it one step higher... We looked at our data and we changed our teaching.

25 Measure what your program contributes to student learning Qualitative data – Media Specialist/Teacher Collaboration – Student activity in the media center – Correlation with content standards – Correlations with literacy standards – Assessments – Impact measures collaborative planning, information literacy, & links to state standards

26 Collection Assessment Data If you want to convince me of something show me the numbers.... Use data to –Determine weaknesses –Plan for improvement

27 Make the online catalog a better tool Enhance catalog records –Reading levels –Curricular connections More attention being paid to readability, reading levels

28 Aligning online catalog with test scores NWEA data example: Brush Colorado –State test reading scores Update collection with students scores and Lexile scores With the database I can direct students to the books at their levels---books no longer come back unused. (Correlating Data to Materials, Multimedia & May/June 2002)

29 Teach students & staff how to use everyday tools such as Word Leveling books –Teach kids Spell checkers - Word features –Correlation between spelling, reading and reading Keep dictionaries and encyclopedias in labs

30 Work within reality of classroom collections Maintain integrity of media collection while supporting teachers Set up as special type in online catalog –CRC – Best Practice collections – Carl Harvey’s “Leveled Library Branch” –SYSTEMS PROVIDE DATA Harvey, Carol A. “Leveling for Leverage,” Library Media Connection, January 2006 (pp )

31 Promote reading Colorful, attractive, appealing displays Book preview events Events such as Family Reading Nights Promote books for guys & series books Appealing non-fiction

32 Power-up your media center’s web site Reading lists –Classics –Summer reading –Curriculum connections –New media center books –2 essential links Guys Read Books in a Series

33 Web site Links to resources that help students and staff be successful Resources to help students prepare for state tests Information about the media program’s role in student success

34 Links to resources correlated with textbooks To web resources To media center resources

35 Hand-on sessions for parents Resource availability –Including state databases Have parents use the tools students use June’s story

36 Become an expert & advisor Research studies Disseminate information Get involved Create a NCLB resource center Develop your resource collection –Journal articles –AASl and state advocacy materials –Impact studies

37 Help administrators make wise decisions Testing services Online staff development Resources Be prepared for elevator speeches

38 Help teachers become highly qualified Staff Development – Popular Winona Workshop » Everyday Tech Tools and Reading –Effective searching –Best practices –Integration, Constructivist teaching –Assessment tools »HM. Media staff as peer coaches »TEALS

39 Make the media center a cool place for kids of all ages

40 More information Handouts /Anderson/Anderson.html /Anderson/Anderson.html Select link to workshops, speaking Online courses


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