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Advocacy Training for Influence and Impact Arkansas ASCD January 6, 2011.

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Presentation on theme: "Advocacy Training for Influence and Impact Arkansas ASCD January 6, 2011."— Presentation transcript:

1 Advocacy Training for Influence and Impact Arkansas ASCD January 6, 2011

2 ASCD Public Policy  ASCD –Founded in 1943 –Reputation for educational leadership dedicated to best practices and policies for the success of each learner.  Public Policy –Established –Advocating for educators and students

3 No Child Left Behind Act  Dramatic alteration of federal role –Direct involvement in schools –Prescriptive policies –“What happened?”

4 ASCD Public Policy  Influence and advocacy  Relatively new and growing –160,000 members –13,000 Educator Advocates  Overcoming pushback

5 ASCD Public Policy “The genteel age when school leaders need not involve themselves with the politics and policies of education are over…if it ever existed at all.”

6 ASCD Public Policy  Policy Team –David Griffith – Director of Public Policy, –Tina Dove – Legislative Advocate, –Melissa Mellor – Advocacy Outreach Manager, –Sumi Vishnu – Program Coordinator,

7 ASCD Advocacy  Annual Legislative Agenda –Member developed –Transparent  Legislative Committee –Mary Gunter –Marsha Jones  Special focus –Whole Child –Professional development

8 ASCD Advocacy  Opportunities –Legislation  ESEA  IDEA –Regulations –Budget/funding/appropriations –Committee hearings

9 ASCD Advocacy  Advocate on behalf of educators & students  Teacher and Principal Improvement Act – Sen. Reed  Race to the Top grant criteria  Comprehensive, well-rounded curriculum  Whole child resolution  Whole child hearing testimony

10 ASCD Advocacy  Resource to policymakers –Schools’ fiscal status  $10 billion EduJobs bill –What works in PD  Emerging state work –Whole child state policy recommendations  Work with affiliates  Information to members

11 ASCD Advocacy  Educator Advocates –Weekly newsletter  Tailored to educator leaders  Legislative & Policy Updates –Congress, Department, White House, national news, reports –ESEA –Status of the Common Core –Funding –Children’s issues –www.educatoradvocates.orgwww.educatoradvocates.org

12 Leadership Institute for Legislative Advocacy (LILA)  Legislative Conference, January 22-24, 2012 –Policy briefings  Secretary Arne Duncan  ESEA reauthorization  FY12 funding and fiscal outlook –Advocacy training –Take your message to federal policymakers –Continue policy discussions & advocacy at the state and local levels

13 ASCD Advocacy  Action Center –www.ascd.org/actioncenterwww.ascd.org/actioncenter –Action alerts –Legislative research –Priority bills –Talking points –Communication tools   Facebook  Twitter #ascdpolicy

14 Why Advocate?

15 “Lobbyist”

16

17 Why Advocate?  NCLB  Share expertise  Support children  Direct effect on professional role/responsibilities  Exposure/visibility  Others are doing it  Member service (Arkansas ASCD) –Empower members  Politics of education

18 U.S. K-12 Education Funding

19 Federal Role in Education  Research, evaluation, information dissemination –Best practices, Regional labs, What Works Clearinghouse  Data collection –NCES & NAEP  National priorities and solutions –Closing the achievement gap, college access  Equity and special populations –Students with disabilities, LEP, socio-economically disadvantaged students

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21 No Child Left Behind Act  Expanded testing  Grades 3-8 (once in high school)  Reading and math  Stricter accountability  Set goals, timeline  Specific interventions

22 No Child Left Behind Act  Highly-qualified” teacher definition  100% in all core subjects  Bachelor’s degree  State licensure  deadline

23 No Child Left Behind Act  Sweeping reforms –Dramatic shift in federal role –Huge change for advocacy  Lessons from NCLB –Input from educators needed –Rank & file distrust of education committees –National education groups minimized/maximized

24 Why Advocacy Matters  Obligation  Educational leader  Altruism  Children’s advocate  Self-interest  Teacher qualifications  School reforms  Accountability  Classroom impact

25 Why Not Advocate  Not my job  Too busy  Don’t know how  Issues don’t matter/affect me  Won’t make a difference

26 Why Advocate National Issues  Need to be engaged and aware  Expertise/experience to offer  Ensure coordination with state/local/school policies/practices  Harbinger of state and local reforms

27 Why Advocate  Members of Congress –Want to hear from you –Need to hear from you  ASCD –Wants you to speak –Needs you to speak

28 “When the eagles are silent, the parrots begin to jabber.” - - Winston Churchill

29 Get Involved  Get Involved Get Involved

30 2010 Elections & the New Political Landscape

31 House of Representatives Before & After  Democrats – 255  Republicans – = Majority 111 th Congress112 th Congress  Democrats – 193  Republicans – 242

32 House of Representatives Before & After  House Speaker  Nancy Pelosi (D-CA)  Majority Leader  Steny Hoyer (D–MD)  Majority Whip  Jim Clyburn (D–SC)  Education Committee Chairman  George Miller (D–CA) 111 th Congress 112 th Congress  House Speaker  John Boehner (R–OH)  Majority Leader  Eric Cantor (R–VA)  Majority Whip  Kevin McCarthy (R–CA)  Education Committee Chairman  John Kline (R–MN)

33 House Republican Leaders  Rep. John Boehner (OH)  Speaker of the House  Education Chair during NCLB

34 House Republican Leaders  Rep. John Kline (MN)  Education reform priorities for 112 th Congress –restore local control –empower parents –let teachers teach –protect taxpayers  Advocate for IDEA full funding

35 House of Representatives Before & After  Republicans – More conservative - Tea party candidates  Democrats – More liberal -Half of “Blue Dogs” lost -Half of votes against health care lost -Out – Hill (IN), Kanjorski, Murphy and Dahlkemper,(PA), Etheridge (NC)

36 Senate Before & After  Democrats – 59  Republicans th Congress112 th Congress  Democrats – 53  Republicans - 47

37 Senate Before & After  Majority Leader  Harry Reid (D–NV)  Majority Whip  Dick Durbin (D–IL)  Education Committee Chairman  Tom Harkin (D–IA) MajorityMinority  Minority Leader  Mitch McConnell (R–KY)  Minority Whip  Jon Kyl (R–AZ)  Education Committee Ranking Member  Mike Enzi (R–WY)

38 Senate Majority Leaders  Sen. Reid (NV)  Majority Leader  Recipient of ASCD’s Whole Child Leadership Award  Supporter of addressing the dropout crisis, high school reform, STEM.  Wants NCLB to address student growth and include middle and high school improvement.

39 Senate Majority Leaders  Sen. Harkin (IA)  Education Committee Chairman and Education Appropriations Chairman  Winner of ASCD’s first Whole Child Leadership Award  Supports increased funding for NCLB and IDEA.

40 Senate Minority Leaders  Sen. Mike Enzi (WY)  Ranking Member on HELP Committee  Concerned about rural schools –Opposes idea of competitive funding found in ESEA Blueprint.

41 Senate Minority Leaders  Sen. Lamar Alexander (TN)  Former Secretary of Education (Bush 41)  Supportive of Teacher Incentive Fund (TIF), charters, state-led common standards, and RttT.

42 Senate Republican Wild Cards  Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (KY)  Legislative priority - Make Obama 1-term president  Sen. Jim DeMint (SC)  “Self appointed” leader of Tea Party  Could make it difficult for McConnell to compromise with Democrats and President on many issues.

43 Senate Before & After  Republicans – More conservative -Out - Specter (PA), Bennett (UT), LeMieux (FL) -In - Paul (KY), Rubio (FL), Lee (UT), Toomey (PA)  Democrats – More liberal -Out - Bayh (IN), Lincoln (AR), Feingold (WI) -In - Chris Coons (DE), Joe Manchin (WV)

44 Elections & Education  Campaign Issues –Economy –Obama –Health care –Big Government/Spending

45 Elections & Education  Education was not a campaign issue  Four Reform Priorities  Higher standards  Effective teachers  Data management  School turnaround  Main programs  Race to the Top grants  i3 grants  Race to the Top assessment grants  ARRA  $100 billion for education

46 Governors 37 Elections: Republicans 23 Democrats 13 Independents 1 GOP gained 11 states

47 State Legislatures Republicans 25 Democrats 16 Split 7 GOP gained control of 11 legislatures Source: National Conference of State Legislatures, 2010

48 Chief State School Officers  Elections were held in seven states  Arizona, California, Georgia, Idaho, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Wyoming  All but Tom Torlakson (CA) are Republicans  Meanwhile, six new governors will be appointing new chiefs  All of those governors are Republicans

49 What all this change means…  Chiefs’ platforms:  School choice  Local control  More $ into the classroom  School safety/classroom discipline  Career & technical education  Rethinking teacher tenure  Potentially significant implications for efforts like Race to the Top and the Common Core State Standards Initiative.

50 Common Core State Standards Initiative  38 states and DC have signed on to the common core; nine of these states and DC will have entirely new leadership implementing the standards  New leadership opinion on the initiative is mixed:  Georgia: New governor Nathan Deal has commended common core for cost-saving and flexibility; new chief John Barge has criticized it for leading to more federal control.

51 Arkansas Election Results

52 Federal Results for Arkansas  Senate – John Boozman (R) defeated incumbent Blanche Lincoln (D)  House – three Republican wins in four districts

53 State Results for Arkansas  One of only 13 states to elect a Democratic Governor this year (incumbent Mike Beebe)  One of only 16 states with a Democratic state legislature  One of only 11 states with both a Democratic state legislature and governor

54 Election Trends  Parental involvement/empowerment  Local control  Frugality  Vouchers/ “School Choice”  Abolish Department of Education

55 2011 Education Issues & Policies

56 National Standards/Common Core  Federal involvement/role versus local control  Adoption versus implementation  Assessments  Professional development

57 Accountability  deadline for 100% proficiency  Growth model  College and career readiness standards –Reading and math –Other core subjects  Lowest 5%

58 Teacher Effectiveness  Merit pay  Race to the Top  Highly qualified versus highly effective

59 School Choice  Vouchers  Opportunity scholarships  Parental empowerment

60 Funding  Return to FY08 levels  Education cuts  Competitive funding/incentive funding

61 ESEA Reauthorization  ESEA Blueprint –College & career-ready standards (i.e., Common Core) –Student growth accountability –Teacher effectiveness –Complete education –Safe, healthy, successful students

62 ESEA Reauthorization  Will it happen in 2011?  If not, what happens?  Deal or No Deal?  Accomplishment  Political talking points

63 ASCD’s Whole Child Recommendations  Establish a state commission to ensure whole child policies and practices.  Align and coordinate services, resources, and data across state agencies that serve children.  Publish an annual state report card that measures the health, safety, and education of children and families.

64 Arkansas Policy Issues  Common core  Adequate and equitable funding for public schools  School consolidation/busing  Middle and high school improvement/reducing college remediation rates  Teacher and principal evaluation

65 What state policy issues are you most concerned about and want Arkansas ASCD to influence this year?

66 Advocacy 101

67 Advocacy Tools & Strategies  Letters/ s/calls  Meetings –In Washington –In the District  School visits  Templates/alerts for others  Media

68 Advocacy Do’s & Don’ts  Do’s –Your homework –Take the first step –Share your expertise –Focus on your elected officials –Keep it simple  Who, what, when, where, how, why  The “Ask”  Be mindful of space and time

69 Advocacy Do’s & Don’ts  Do’s –Be specific  Provide examples  Use data –Communicate early and often –Establish relationships –Follow up –Be persistent –Become a resource

70 Advocacy Do’s & Don’ts  Don’ts –Go one and done –Be pushy –Be rude –Negative –Burn bridges –Give up –Lie

71 Advocacy Do’s & Don’ts  Don’ts –Be vague with your message/ask –Be unfocused

72 Mr. Cohen Goes to Washington  Part 1 Part 1

73 Advanced Advocacy

74 Framing & Refining Your Message  Words matter  Accentuate the positive  Eliminate the negative –Politically –Public  Establish rapport  Use shorthand  Make it memorable

75 Framing & Refining Your Message  Spin Doctor Frank Luntz: It’s not what you say, it’s what people hear.

76 Framing & Refining Your Message  Estate tax  Campaign promise  Spending  Abortion  End of life counseling  Death tax  Contract with America  Investments  Pro-life/Pro-choice  Death panels

77 Framing & Refining Your Message  Elementary and Secondary Education Act  Vouchers  No Child Left Behind Act  School choice or Opportunity scholarships

78 Framing & Refining Your Message  National standards  Schools in need of improvement  Common core  Failing schools

79 Framing & Refining Your Message  Highlight results over process  Use action words  Avoid acronyms  Avoid jargon  Don’t try too hard  Make it believable

80 Anticipate Tough Questions What tough questions might be asked related to your policy issue?

81 Organizational Advocacy  Education –Explain the “why” –Highlight successes  Model it/live it –Make it a regular agenda item –Cultivate advocacy ambassadors  Communication –Internal and external  Collaboration –Develop partnerships/coalitions

82 Organizational Advocacy  Engagement strategies –Action alerts –Events  State Capitol Days  Rallies  Policy briefings  Meet and greets –Newsletters –Social networking –Media

83 What is your POLICY New Year’s Resolution? ESEA Reauthorization

84 Mr. Cohen Goes to Washington  Part 2 Part 2

85 Advocacy Training for Influence and Impact Arkansas ASCD Conference January 6, 2011 David Griffith, Melissa Mellor,


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