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TRUANCY AND HOW TO CHANGE IT Joe DeGregorio, Eric Yager-Schweller, Shane Rogers, Connor Peck, Paul Inclan, Wes Kahlig, Rich Lovell.

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Presentation on theme: "TRUANCY AND HOW TO CHANGE IT Joe DeGregorio, Eric Yager-Schweller, Shane Rogers, Connor Peck, Paul Inclan, Wes Kahlig, Rich Lovell."— Presentation transcript:

1 TRUANCY AND HOW TO CHANGE IT Joe DeGregorio, Eric Yager-Schweller, Shane Rogers, Connor Peck, Paul Inclan, Wes Kahlig, Rich Lovell

2 American Education vs. World Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Surveyed kids at age 15 from various countries belonging to OECD Of 30 nations studied, US ranked 21 st in scientific literacy, 25 th in mathematics literacy, and 24 th in problem solving skills 2

3 In Search of Academic Improvement… In 2001, George W. Bush introduces No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) In regards to truancy: effective in , each state must report truancy rates for all public institutions Problem with analyzing truancy statistics nationally is lack of uniformity in laws from state to state 3

4 New Approaches Analysts correlate truancy to various poor behaviors, but finding studies that can properly support their theories is difficult National Center for School Engagement (NCSE) suggests ways to better define the prevalence of the problem NCES Longitudinal Data NCES Common Core of Data Juvenile Justice Statistics in Truancy Court A Sampling of Large School Districts from across the country 4

5 Conclusions Each effort of NCSE came with its own pros and cons It is evident that the US has a problem with truancy, and it is highly likely that this problem plays a role in the nation’s academic standing relative to other advanced countries Putting accurate numerical values on the pervasiveness of truancy and judging its direct consequences on US test taking is the difficult part 5

6 Federal Government Doesn’t create specific legislation concerning truancy Only provides guidelines through the Department of Education 6

7 Ohio Revised Code: Definitions Habitual Truant Ohio Revised Code “any child of compulsory school age who is absent without legitimate excuse for absence from the public school the child is supposed to attend for five or more consecutive days, seven or more school days in one school month, or twelve or more school days in a school year.” Chronic Truant Ohio Revised code “any child of compulsory school age who is absent without legitimate excuse for absence from the public school the child is supposed to attend for seven or more consecutive school days, ten or more school days in one school month, or fifteen or more school days in a school year.” 7

8 Ohio Revised Code: Mentions of Truancy Ohio Revised Code Establishes an education program for the parents of truant students Ohio Revised Code Definition of Delinquent children Ohio Revised Code Juvenile court definitions 8

9 Causes of Truancy Costs of truancy are high Imperative to understand root causes Three main contributing factors: 1. Family/Community 2. School 3. Student 9

10 Causes: Family Factors Poor parent involvement (examples): Lack of supervision Poverty Violence Parenting involvement dictates: Child’s academic abilities Attendance and completion rates Overall school performance ◦ Substance abuse ◦ Lack of awareness ◦ Attitude towards education 10

11 Causes: Community Factors Unsafe or unsupportive communities High rates of child-self care Lack of responsiveness to truancy SES – Relative standing in society Related to income, background, power, and prestige Children with low SES have higher rates of truancy 11

12 Causes: School Factors School Procedures Ineffective policies Poor record keeping Failure to notify parents School Environment Safety – violence and bullying Comfortable surroundings ◦ Staff relations ◦ Inadequate educational needs 12

13 Causes: Student Factors Student Involvement Substance abuse Educational ambition Socially integrate Mental/Physical limitations Poor student involvement: Risk of exclusion Delinquent activities 13

14 Consequences State Legislature and the education laws are determined by the state No Child Left Behind Act- Requires schools and districts to report attendance rates 14

15 Consequences Law enforcement departments must decide whether to pick up truants and what to do with them Court System decides Which court will hear the truancy case Whether to hold a separate truancy docket How to achieve consistency in sentencing among judges What sanctions to employ Whether and what kind of alternative truancy reduction program to offer 15

16 Students Consequences Can be fined anywhere from $250 to $5000 depending on the state and the court Some states also have the power to take away the drivers license of the student Students can also be sent to diversion classes or to community service It is believed that truants are more likely than other students to end up in juvenile and the adult criminal justice system 16

17 Parental Consequences Depends on the age of the student, state of residence, and the court philosophy Most often include fines, orders to attend school with children, or parenting class Extreme cases parents may face dependency or neglect charges, lose custody of their children, or face jail time 17

18 School Policy on Truancy Most all schools have some written strategy that addresses attendance problems Policies may differ, but some of the recurring themes are: School must provide truancy intervention and counseling for student (parents, guardians, caretaker optional) School must identify the truant to the Bureau of Motor Vehicles School must take legal action against the truant’s parents, guardians, caretaker 18

19 Contra Costa County, California Decided to implement truancy program at the elementary school age School officials would checkup on any unexcused absences Way to monitor the child’s actions, offer connection back to school life Beneficial to address truancy earlier rather than later 19

20 Mesa, Arizona Decided to send recurring truants to juvenile count and charge with a crime High school truancy officials track student’s truancy Punishment: typically a fine, community service, or suspension of driving license Found to be very effective, more expensive 20

21 Elementary school intervention Truant behavior is not ingrained Parent still has control over child Can be held more accountable High school intervention Requires harsher punishments, more expensive strategies to get same point across 21

22 Solutions Family Solutions School Solutions Community Solutions Government Solutions 22

23 Family Solutions Increased enforcement amongst parents Positive role models Increased awareness Increased importance of school 23

24 School Solutions Stiff penalties for violators Safe atmosphere Quality faculty and staff Fun and relevant classes 24

25 Community Solutions Police enforcement Responsible friends and family Neighborhood Watch programs 25

26 Government Solutions Uniform Laws Strict enforcement and punishment General safety improvement 26


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