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DATA POWER: COLLECTING AND SHARING EDUCATION AND CHILD WELFARE INFORMATION TO IMPROVE EDUCATIONAL OUTCOMES FOR CHILDREN IN FOSTER CARE LCFCE Conference.

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Presentation on theme: "DATA POWER: COLLECTING AND SHARING EDUCATION AND CHILD WELFARE INFORMATION TO IMPROVE EDUCATIONAL OUTCOMES FOR CHILDREN IN FOSTER CARE LCFCE Conference."— Presentation transcript:

1 DATA POWER: COLLECTING AND SHARING EDUCATION AND CHILD WELFARE INFORMATION TO IMPROVE EDUCATIONAL OUTCOMES FOR CHILDREN IN FOSTER CARE LCFCE Conference Call August 13, 2008

2 “Data” Defined  Data = Information [Education]  Statistical & Student Level Statistical Level – national/subcategories  Not personally identifiable Student Level - individual  Education Records  Personally identifiable Aggregate = All Children (national/state) Disaggregate = Subset (kids in care)

3 Why is Data Important: Statistical Level  Indentify systemic problems  Develop effective policies & priorities Reduce barriers to educational success Increase accountability  Substantiate need for funding Increase and target $$  Educate everyone and facilitate collaboration among multiple systems Educate agencies about the children they serve

4 Why Is Data Important Student Level  Individual educational needs of child  Critical to well being  Triggers prompt intervention  Informs other decisions (e.g., placement and transition goals)  Enhances and improves delivery of services

5 Data Disconnect  Limited Information Available No National Statistics Few Statewide Studies Limited Regional/Local Studies  However, those studies consistently indicate that children in care are educationally at risk and in crisis

6 What We Know Educational CRISIS  Only one-third of students in substitute care receive a regular diploma within four years;  Twice as likely to drop out;  2-4 times as many youth in out-of home care have repeated grades compared to their non-foster care peers;  Score significantly below their peers on standardized tests, have lower reading levels and lower grades in core academic subjects  Greater absenteeism

7 What We Need To Know  Beyond geographic snapshots  Extent of the problem  Longitudinal data tracking children over time  Statistically significant factors contributing to educational failure Eg., multiple school changes; type of placement; length of stay; discipline rates  What is working Trauma informed curriculum; positive behavioral supports

8 What is Being Collected, By Whom and to What End? Education and Child Welfare:  What is the purpose of the data collection?  Where/how is the information maintained?  How is it currently being used?  What data relates to the educational outcomes of children in care?  How could it be revised/expanded to improve educational outcomes for children in care?  How could it be shared across systems?

9 Identifying Children in Care  Only Child Welfare Knows  Possible Solutions: Residency Codes: Enrollment status Student Identification Numbers: Child welfare maintains Student ID Nos. in case files & supplies list to education Data Matching: Match Name/DOB with Education’s Unique Student Identifier

10 What is Education Collecting  NCLB: No Child Left Behind Act....  Collects Critical Information in ALL States  Electronically Maintained  Student Identification Numbers

11 No Child Left Behind Act  Passed in 2002; reauthorized the Elementary and Secondary Education Act 20 U.S.C. § 6301 et seq.  Purpose: I mprove educational performance and eliminate the achievement gap between groups of students. Requires States to implement accountability systems at the State, school district and school level.

12 Understanding NCLB  Students attending Title I schools designated “in need of improvement” for two consecutive years have opportunity to transfer to new school in the same district  Low income students attending Title I schools designated as failing for at least three of four prior years, must receive “supplemental educational services”  Students who attend persistently dangerous schools, or who have been victimized by school violence, must be allowed to transfer to a safer school in the district

13 What Data Does Education Collect Under NCLB?  Attendance: Days “absent without excuse” and days enrolled in school  School Enrollment: Tracks student mobility, enrollment delays & grade level designation at time of enrollment  Academic Progress* Standardized scores  Special Education* Disability & Services  Program Template: Participation in remedial & other programs (Title I, HS)  * = May be separate State data system

14 Student Template Data  Gender  Race/Ethnicity  Student Status – Court placed “or” alt ed.  Economic status (Free/Reduced Lunch Program)  Educationally Disadvantaged under Career and Technical Education programs:  Plan 504 Indicator  LEP Participation/English Proficiency/Language Breakdown/Language/ Home Language Code  Courses – Advanced courses only  Grade retention  Expected Graduation, Graduation Status Code & Type of Diploma  Expected Post Graduate Activity

15 What Could Education Collect  Prompt Enrollment (FL example)  Truancy Rates under State Law  School Performance (San Diego)  Special Education Data - Expanded  Academic Progress – Expanded  Program Data – Vocational & ESY  Course Enrollment  Credit Transfers  Discipline  Higher Ed Data

16 Longitudinal Data Under NCLB  NCLB strongly endorses the use of longitudinal data: “Each State may incorporate the data from assessments into longitudinal data systems that link student test scores, length of enrollment and graduation records over time.” Title I Part A Sec. 111(b)3(B) U.S. Dept. of Ed provides funding to states to develop systems to link records over time OR to identify best educational practices

17 NCLB State Data Collection  45 states have developed a statewide “student identifier” that connects student-specific data across key databases and across years.  18 states have data systems which align PreK-12 and post-secondary education systems to track students through their post-secondary careers.

18 What’ s In YOUR State  Data Quality Campaign http://www.dataqualitycampaign.org/sur vey_results/index.cfm http://www.dataqualitycampaign.org/sur vey_results/index.cfm  Education Commission of the States http://mb2.ecs.org/reports/Report.aspx? id=913 http://mb2.ecs.org/reports/Report.aspx? id=913

19 What Does Child Welfare Collect  Title IV-E of the Social Security Act 42 U.S.C.A. 675(1)(C) & (5)(D) Requires that child welfare agency case plans include the most recent information available regarding education records of child  Duty to review and update  Duty to supply to every foster parent/provider  Must consider education in making placement decisions

20 Child & Family Service Reviews 42 U.S.C.A. 1320a-2a  Well-Being Outcome 2, states: “Children receive appropriate services to meet their educational needs.” 34 states NOT is substantial conformity  Availability of school records is a factor in determining whether a state child welfare agency is meeting the educational needs of a child

21 AFCARS (Adoption and Foster Care Analysis and Reporting System)  45 C.F.R. 1355.40  Semi-annual  Currently, only ONE question of 66 even mentions education (re visual impairment)  Proposed Amendments to AFCARS: Learning or developmental disability Special education Repeated Grade: if so, how many

22 What Could Child Welfare Collect  Whether living placement resulted in school change & re-enrollments  Special Ed: early intervention; evaluations requested/conducted; services delivered as child moves; type of learning/devp’l disability  Early Childhood Education Headstart/other programs: what age & how long

23 What Could Child Welfare Collect  Type of educational placement: public school, on-ground school, alternative education  School completion element: Including WHY child dropped out  Transition Readiness: level of education, life skills training, plans

24 Sharing Data & Information Across Systems Real and Perceived Barriers:  Child Welfare Laws: CAPTA 42 U.S.C. 5106 (A)(B)(2) & (A)(B)(A) State laws must protect confidentiality of child welfare records & specify when and with whom records may be shared State statues may authorize info. sharing Permits sharing of info. with gov’t agency to protect child from abuse/neglect

25 Education Laws: FERPA Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act 20 U.S.C. § 1233g; 34 CFR Part 99  Purpose: to protect privacy interests of parents and students regarding the students’ education records  Parent’s right to share or refuse to share records  Exceptions to parental consent

26 When Can Education Records Be Shared with Child Welfare:  Is It An Education Record?  Directory Information?  If It Qualifies: Parent consents  Parental Consent Form (time of placement) Child Welfare Agency may meet FERPA definition of parent (acting in place of parent) State law authorizing disclosure OR FERPA Exceptions to consent

27 FERPA Exceptions to Consent:  Research  “Specifically authorized by Federal Law”  Officials and authorities indicated by state statute for purposes of improving JJ system’s ability to serve the student  Appropriate persons when release of information is needed to comply with judicial order or subpoena

28 Sharing Information To Improve Educational Outcomes  Education -> Child Welfare  Child Welfare –>Ed  Joint Research  Common Data System Accessed by Multiple Agencies (with varying levels of accessibility)

29 Examples of Data Collection & Information Sharing  Florida Department of Education  Utah  California Los Angeles Education Coordinating Council San Diego  Pennsylvania  Your State Here

30 Contact Information Education Law Center www.elc-pa.org Maura McInerney mcinerney@elc-pa.org


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