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No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 Presented by: Karen Ryback Los Angeles County Office of Education Division for School Improvement.

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Presentation on theme: "No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 Presented by: Karen Ryback Los Angeles County Office of Education Division for School Improvement."— Presentation transcript:

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2 No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 Presented by: Karen Ryback Los Angeles County Office of Education Division for School Improvement

3 Rejected Names for NCLB: Most Kids Doing Pretty Well Leave No Lawyers Behind Survivor NCLB: The Administrator’s Challenge Timelines and Benchmarks and Plans, Oh My! Goals 2005: Better than My Dad’s

4 Elementary & Secondary Education Act (ESEA) Enacted in 1965 as cornerstone of President Johnson’s “War on Poverty” Reauthorized every 5-6 years

5 No Child Left Behind Act Two years of negotiations Bi-partisan with political compromises Signed into law on January 8, 2002 Over 1,000 pages 14 Titles reorganized/consolidated into 10 Total Price Tag--$26.5 billion

6 NCLB Themes Stronger accountability for results Greater flexibility Expanded options for parents Emphasis on scientifically-based research

7 Implementation of NCLB SEA plans--describing how NCLB requirements will be met--must be approved by USDE (May 2003) LEA Plans are due June 1, 2003 to CDE for approval Five Goals 59 Assurances

8 Overview of NCLB’s 10 Titles

9 Title I: Improving Academic Achievement for the Disadvantaged Aid for pupils in high- poverty schools Reading programs for young children Education for migratory and neglected & delinquent children Comprehensive School Reform (CSR) grants

10 Title II: Preparing, Training, and Recruiting High Quality Teachers and Principals Training & recruitment programs Math & science partnerships Teacher training on use of technology in the classroom

11 Title III: Language Instruction for Limited English Proficient Language instruction to foster English fluency Successful academic achievement in core academic subjects

12 Title IV: 21st Century Schools Safe & Drug Free Schools Drug & Violence Prevention Programs Student Code of Conduct Policy School Discipline Policies Crisis Management Plan Hate Crime Prevention Gun Possession After-school programs 21st Century Community Learning Centers Tobacco Prevention

13 Title V: Promoting Informed Parental Choice & Innovative Programs Grants for Innovative Programs Public Charter Schools Magnet Schools

14 Title VI:Flexibility & Accountability Grants to implement accountability mandates Transferability of funds Flexibility Demonstration Agreements

15 Title VII: Indian, Native Hawaiian, and Alaska Education Special Programs for Native Americans Educational Opportunities Professional Development for Teachers/Education Professionals Fellowships Gifted & Talented Adult Education Family Literacy

16 Title VIII: Impact Aide Aid for school districts affected by military bases, Indian reservations & other non-taxable federal land

17 Title IX: General Provisions Definitions Highly Qualified Professional Development Scientifically Based Research School Prayer Military Recruiter Access Unsafe School Choice Option

18 Title X: Repeals, Redesignations & Amendments Homeless Education

19 Significant Changes in the Law

20 Single Statewide Accountability System Goal: All students proficient or above in English Language Arts and Mathematics by All public schools, all students Economically disadvantaged Major racial/ethnic groups  African American (not of Hispanic origin)  American Indian or Alaska Native  Asian  Filipino  Hispanic or Latino  Pacific Islander  White (not of Hispanic origin) Limited-English proficient Students with disabilities

21 Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) Achievement of the statewide Annual Measurable Objectives (AMOs) in English Language Arts and Mathematics 95% participation rate Achievement on “other” indicator API for all schools Graduation rate for high schools

22 AMOs Based on English-Language Arts (ELA) and Mathematics separately Grade 10 CAHSEE/CAPA ELA: Proficient or above = 387+ Math: Proficient or above = 373+

23 AMOs: English Language Arts Elementary and Middle Schools and Elementary Districts

24 AMOs: Mathematics Elementary and Middle Schools and Elementary Districts

25 AMOs: English Language Arts High Schools and High School Districts

26 AMOs: Math High Schools and High School Districts

27 AMOs: English Language Arts Unified Districts and High School Districts with Grades 7/8

28 AMOs: Math Unified Districts and High School Districts with Grades 7/8

29 The API “Status Bar’

30 Graduation Rate High schools must show progress Increase of one tenth of one per cent per year until the school reaches 100% Based on the National Center for Educational Statistics (NCES) four year completion rate

31 NCLB Student Mobility Rules Student was enrolled since CBEDS date Count in school accountability report Count in district accountability report Student was enrolled in more than one school in the same district since CBEDS date Yes No Count in state accountability report No

32 Subgroup Size Schools will be held accountable for groups that have: 100 students, OR 50 students that comprise 15% of the student population Reporting will occur for groups with at least 11 students

33 Program Improvement

34 “OF COURSE, IF THEY’’RE ALL LEFT BEHIND, THEN, RELATIVELY SPEAKING, NONE ARE LEFT BEHIND” …FOR WHAT IT’S WORTH… From the comic strip: Pett Peeves by Joel Pett

35 Proposed Regulations NCLB Compliant Teachers “New” to the profession Hired on or after July 1, 2002 “Not new” to the profession Hired prior to July 1, 2002

36 Timelines for Compliance New teachers teaching a core academic subject in a Title I SWP school or funded with Title I funds in a TAS school, must have been NCLB compliant when hired. All other public school teachers teaching a core academic subject, must be compliant by the last day of the school year.

37 Core Academic Subjects English Reading/language arts Mathematics Science History Geography Civics/government Economics Foreign languages Arts

38 3 Requirements for Core Subject Teachers Bachelor’s degree State credential or Intern certificate/credential (for no more than three years Demonstrated core academic subject-matter competence

39 Core Academic Subject Matter Competence Elementary Must pass the California Subject Examination for Teachers (CSET) Middle/High School CCTC approved subject matter exam or program A major A major equivalent Graduate degree “New” Teachers

40 Core Academic Subject Matter Competence “Not New” Teachers Elementary: Pass any past/current CCTC approved subject matter exam OR complete the HOUSSE Middle/High School: For each core subject taught:  CCTC approved subject matter program OR  A major OR  A major equivalent OR  A graduate degree OR  National Board Certification (NBC)  Complete the HOUSSE

41 HOUSSE “High Objective Uniform State Standard of Evaluation” 100 points required to be satisfied through Part I and/or Part II

42 HOUSSE : Part I Summation of: Years of experience in grade span/subject (Max. 50 pts.) Core academic coursework in grade span/subject In-depth standards aligned professional development Service to the profession in relevant core academic content

43 HOUSSE: Part 2 Completion of successful observations Required documentation: lesson plan, analysis of student performance, and observer notes (Each observation = 20 pts) Completion of portfolio assessment 4 entries required: 5 sequenced lesson plans, student assignments, analysis of student performance, reviewer notes (100 pts--no partial credit)

44 Paraprofessionals All instruction paraprofessionals Must have a high school diploma/equivalency May only be assigned to work under the direct supervision of a HQ teacher Must be assigned only permissible duties as listed in the law

45 Heightened Requirements Must meet one of the following: Associate’s degree Two years of study at an institution of higher education (48 semester units) Local rigorous academic assessment Knowledge of reading, writing, & mathematics (or readiness) Ability to assist in instructing in reading, writing, & mathematics (or readiness)

46 Timelines for Paraprofessionals Affected ParaprofessionalsDate of Implementation All newly hired Title I-funded paraprofessionals and all newly hired paraprofessionals in a Title I Schoolwide Program school January 8, 2002 All previously hired Title I-funded paraprofessionals and all previously hired paraprofessionals in a Title I Schoolwide Program school January 8, 2006

47 Cap on Funding The district may not fund any additional paraprofessionals with Title I, Part A funds, if after 3 years, the district does not make progress toward meeting its HQ teacher objectives and AYP.

48 Parent Notifications Parents Right-to-Know (Title I Schools) May request the qualifications of their child’s teacher/paraprofessional 4-Week Notice (Title I Schools) When child has been taught for 4 or more consecutive weeks by a core subject teacher who does not meet the NCLB

49 Unsafe School Choice Option Option to transfer to a safe school must be given if child is: in a school identified as “persistently dangerous” the victim of a violent crime on school property

50 Military Recruiter Access to Students LEAs are required to provide secondary students’ names, addresses, and telephone listings, when requested (unless a parent “opts out”) LEAs must provide the same access to military recruiters to secondary school students as given to postsecondary institutions or prospective employers

51 Questions Karen Ryback Title I/NCLB Consultant Los Angeles County Office of Education Division for School Improvement (562)


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