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Mariann Jelinek National Science Foundation Lisboa June 21-23, 2001 Fostering the Marketplace for Ideas.

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Presentation on theme: "Mariann Jelinek National Science Foundation Lisboa June 21-23, 2001 Fostering the Marketplace for Ideas."— Presentation transcript:

1 Mariann Jelinek National Science Foundation Lisboa June 21-23, 2001 Fostering the Marketplace for Ideas

2 For every complex problem, there’s a simple, obvious and popular answer that happens to be wrong! H.L. Menken, American Satirist

3 3 The Complex Problem and its failed solutions. The Long Incline: Science, Technology Innovation and Economic Growth Government’s Role: Fostering a Vigorous Marketplace for Knowledge Presentation Themes:

4 4 Diverse Economic Outcomes Failed Socialist Economies Failure of Centralized Efforts Skilled vs Unskilled, Urban vs Rural... In China, India, and Iran -- and in the U.S. and Europe and Asia, too A Widening Gap in Skills and Potential A Growing Role for Science and Technology

5 5 The Long Incline Western European Economic Growth for Centuries: 2%/year... Cumulative US Economic Growth: New Technology, and Scientific Intensivity Constant Reconfiguration of Economic Activity, putting Knowledge to Work

6 6 The U.S. Innovation System is Evolving Increased Role of Research in InnovationIncreased Role of Research in Innovation More Rapid CommercializationMore Rapid Commercialization Demise of Large Corporate Basic Research Laboratories (with a few notable exceptions)Demise of Large Corporate Basic Research Laboratories (with a few notable exceptions) More Innovating Newcomers and Small FirmsMore Innovating Newcomers and Small Firms Importance of Public FundingImportance of Public Funding Pervasive Information TechnologyPervasive Information Technology

7 7 Patent Citations of S&T Literature Source: NSF/SRS Up ten-fold since 1988 Doubled since 1996

8 8 Employment of Scientists and Engineers* *1997 Data from NSF Science Indicators

9 9 Science/Technology Linkage Patents granted in the US patent system are increasingly linked to public research. Two-thirds of the cited papers were published by organizations primarily supported by public funding.

10 10 The number of U.S. patents in health and information technologies increased by 400% between 1980 and The number of U.S. patents in health and information technologies increased by 400% between 1980 and Human Genome not possible without extensive IT... But generates many new possibilities. -- Designed, Targeted Pharmaceuticals IT is the Enabler, as Health Care indicates:

11 11 What is Innovation? Innovation is a locally driven process, succeeding where organizational conditions foster the transformation of knowledge into products, processes, systems, and services. Edward J. Malecki Technology and Economic Development, 1997

12 12 National Science Foundation What is the role of NSF in fostering innovation?

13 13 Innovation Elements People Knowledge Infrastructure Tools Free Market for Ideas

14 14

15 15 Source: Jere Denton

16 16 Source: Jere Denton

17 17 Partnerships for Innovation InnovationGoal Innovation is the Goal Partnerships Partnerships are the Way

18 18 University/Industry/Government Partnerships Lessons Learned Of 3200 U.S.universities, perhaps 6 have made significant amounts of money from their intellectual property rights. Interaction benefits seem far more important... Small Businesses that affiliate with academe are significantly more successful than those that don’t. The lasting impact of successful state programs has been the development of the intellectual infrastructure for research and education.

19 19 University/Industry/Government Partnerships Lessons Learned The idea of converting science and technology into tools for economic growth has been embraced by the states, but the lure of technology profits has been detrimental when it pulled academe away from its primary purpose of research and education. Partnerships between universities and governments and industry/business have been most successful when each partner does what it does best, leaving the remainder of the innovation process to the others.

20 20 Partnerships for Innovation... will support the planning and early implementation of new activities designed to support and sustain innovation activities undertaken by promising partnerships among academe, government, and the private sector.

21 21 Partnerships for Innovation Program Goals Enable the transformation of knowledge into innovations that create new wealth, build strong local, regional and national economies and improve the national well-being;

22 22 Broaden the participation of all types of academic institutions and all citizens in NSF activities to more fully meet the broad workforce needs of the national innovation enterprise; and Partnerships for Innovation Program Goals

23 23 Catalyze the enabling infrastructure necessary to foster and sustain innovation for the long-term. Partnerships for Innovation Program Goals

24 24 Partnerships for Innovation Proposals Recommended for Funding First year awards were made for 24 projects in 20 states and Puerto Rico A complete list of partners, with project descriptions is available at:

25 25 Partnerships for Innovation Goals for the 24 Awardees Major Secondary Tech Transfer 20 2 Infrastructure 39 Education 83

26 26 States With Partnerships for Innovation Project Awards HI VT NH CA MD DE NJ RI CT MA NC FL GA TN VA NY PA OH IN MI WI IL MO IA MN TX NM AZ CO UT OR WA PR AK ME WV KY SC ALMS LA AR OK KS NE NV ID WY SD ND MT

27 27 Knowledge Management: Keeping the Conversation Going New Knowledge Generation via Human Capital, Research Support Business-Education Links The Marketplace for Ideas: Variety Selection Replication

28 28 -- END --

29 29 Partnerships for Innovation The Partnerships for Innovation Program received approximately 130 proposals in % came from institutions in the top 50 receiving funds from NSF; 25% from ; and 50% from > states plus DC and Puerto Rico were represented. 19 involve community colleges (7 as the Lead Institution).

30 30 Partnerships for Innovation Of the 130 First Year Proposals - 24 proposals were “Highly Recommended” for Funding 46 proposals were “Recommended” for Funding 60 proposals were “Not Recommended” for Funding All “Highly Recommended” proposals were funded.

31 31 Partnerships for Innovation Review Criteria What is the intellectual merit of the proposed activity? How important is the proposed activity to advancing knowledge and understanding within its own field or across different fields? To what extent does the proposed activity suggest and explore creative and original concepts? How well conceived and organized is the proposed activity? How well qualified is the proposed individual or team to conduct the project?

32 32 Partnerships for Innovation Review Criteria What are the broader impacts of the proposed activity? How well does the activity advance discovery and understanding while promoting teaching, training, and learning? How well does the proposed activity broaden the participation of underrepresented groups (e.g., gender, ethnicity, disability, geographic, etc.)? To what extent will it enhance the infrastructure for research and education, such as facilities, instrumentation, networks, and partnerships? Will the results be disseminated broadly to enhance scientific and technological understanding? What may be the benefits of the proposed activity to society?

33 33 Partnerships for Innovation Review Criteria Integration of Research and Education One of the principal strategies in support of NSF's goals is to foster integration of research and education through the programs, projects, and activities it supports at academic and research institutions. These institutions provide abundant opportunities where individuals may concurrently assume responsibilities as researchers, educators, and students and where all can engage in joint efforts that infuse education with the excitement of discovery and enrich research through the diversity of learning perspectives.

34 34 Partnerships for Innovation Review Criteria The degree to which the participation of institutions serving groups currently underrepresented in the science, engineering and technological workforce are involved in the proposed innovation activity; and, The degree to which institutions that serve regions and/or sectors not yet fully participating in the innovation enterprise contribute to the proposed activity.

35 35 Partnerships for Innovation Review Criteria Integrating Diversity into NSF Programs, Projects, and Activities Broadening opportunities and enabling the participation of all citizens - women and men, underrepresented minorities, and persons with disabilities - is essential to the health and vitality of science and engineering. NSF is committed to this principle of diversity and deems it central to the programs, projects, and activities it considers and supports.

36 36 Partnerships for Innovation Review Criteria In addition to the two NSB-approved criteria, reviewers will also consider the following factors: Responsiveness of the proposal to the goals of the Partnerships for Innovation Program; Potential of the proposed Partnership to foster and sustain innovation in the long-term; The degree to which the proposed activity will stimulate new innovation opportunities for the partner organizations;

37 37 Partnerships for Innovation Partnerships for the 24 Awardees Academe19 Private Sector24 Government16 Venture Capital 5 Incubators 4


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