Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Addressing the barriers to employment Maximising the role of Recovery Colleges JAMES KEMPTON ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION AND SOCIAL POLICY, CENTREFORUM.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Addressing the barriers to employment Maximising the role of Recovery Colleges JAMES KEMPTON ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION AND SOCIAL POLICY, CENTREFORUM."— Presentation transcript:

1 Addressing the barriers to employment Maximising the role of Recovery Colleges JAMES KEMPTON ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION AND SOCIAL POLICY, CENTREFORUM

2 Research  Understand the barriers to employment for people with mental health problems  Consider the role of recovery colleges in addressing these barriers by: (i)understanding their objectives in relation to employment; (ii)identifying what recovery colleges are actually doing; (iii)assessing their impact on employment outcomes; and (iv)considering if there is more recovery colleges could do.

3 “UK employment rate hits highest level since records began”  28% of people of working age do not have jobs.  6% are economically active (ie available and actively searching for work).  22% are economically inactive (ie not available or do not want to work eg students, house wives/husbands).  However 1in 4 people (rising) are economically inactive due to ill health  For people with common mental disorders (depression or anxiety), 64% are unemployed.  For people with severe mental illnesses (psychosis, schizophrenia), 95% are unemployed.

4 The impact of unemployment is profound For individuals  Mental and physical health and wellbeing.  Recovery.  Social contacts and support.  Structure to day and purpose in life.  Develop skills.  Social status.  Achieving economic resources. For society  Long term unemployment is very costly to society.  Mental health problems cost the UK economy £26 billion annually.  Employment is a major driver of the social gradients of physical and mental health mortality.

5

6 Recovery colleges: an educational approach R Perkins, J Repper, M Rinaldi and H Brown, ‘Recovery Colleges’, Centre for Mental Health and Mental Health Network NHS Confederation, 2012 A therapeutic approachAn educational approach Focuses on problems, deficits and dysfunctions Helps people recognise and make use of their talents and resources Strays beyond formal therapy sessions and becomes the over-arching paradigm Assists people in exploring their possibilities and developing their skills Transforms all activities into therapies –work therapy, gardening therapy etc Supports people to achieve their goals and ambitions Problems are defined, and the type of therapy is chosen, by the professional ‘expert’ Staff become coaches who help people find their own solutions Maintains the power imbalances and reinforces the belief that all expertise lies with the professionals Students choose their own courses, work out ways of making sense of (and finding meaning in) what has happened and become experts in managing their own lives.

7 Coverage  In England, there are approximately 28 recovery colleges and many more in development.  There are also recovery colleges in Europe, Canada, New Zealand and the United States

8 Opport unity Introduction to recovery Understanding diagnosis courses Mindfulness Meditation Effective communication Telling your story Taking back control Living beyond an illness Spirituality Returning to work or study Five ways to wellbeing Problem solving Learning to be assertive Future focus HopeControl Recovery

9 Courses relating to employment

10 Case study – South West London & St George’s Recovery College Date openedSeptember 2010 Mission statement The Recovery College uses a recovery based approach to help people recognise and develop their personal resourcefulness in order to become experts in their own self- care, make informed choices about the assistance they need to do this, and do the things they want to do in life. Commissioning body Clinical commissioning group Students 1057 User profile (age, sex, ethnicity, disability etc) Average age = 42.7 Female = 56%, male 44% 69% = White British 44% = schizophrenia Number of staff 8 (4 professionals/4 peers) Training background Occupational therapy, nurses, psychologist, social worker. All must take Preparing to Teach in the Lifelong Learning Sector (PTLLS) Number of courses 51

11 Case study – South West London & St George’s Recovery College What are the course themes?  Understanding mental health problems and their treatment.  Rebuilding your life – the road to recovery.  Developing knowledge and life skills.  Educational courses.  Getting involved with the Recovery College. How many are delivered that relate to employment? 2 DNA38% Are any courses accredited? No Has an evaluation been conducted? Yes

12 Recommendations  Courses should be relevant and accessible to students at different stages of their recovery journey.  Education and employment outcomes (achieved or progression towards) should be written into any recovery intervention.  Recovery Colleges should offer signposting and progression routes to other education and employment focused interventions eg volunteering, IPS, FE college, HE.  Recovery colleges should publish annual performance/impact data.  There should be a national evaluation of the recovery college model.  Both national and institutional level evaluations should review education and employment outcomes.


Download ppt "Addressing the barriers to employment Maximising the role of Recovery Colleges JAMES KEMPTON ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION AND SOCIAL POLICY, CENTREFORUM."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google