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Canine Bed Bug Detection: Philip G. Koehler Margie & Dempsey Sapp Endowed Professor of Urban Pest Management University of Florida Department of Entomology.

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Presentation on theme: "Canine Bed Bug Detection: Philip G. Koehler Margie & Dempsey Sapp Endowed Professor of Urban Pest Management University of Florida Department of Entomology."— Presentation transcript:

1 Canine Bed Bug Detection: Philip G. Koehler Margie & Dempsey Sapp Endowed Professor of Urban Pest Management University of Florida Department of Entomology and Nematology Building 970 Gainesville, FL

2 Bed Bug Detection Visual detection difficult Early infestations go unnoticed Early control more likely to succeed, and these infestations are less likely to spread and are cheaper to control 15 bed bug nymphs in slots of drywall screw

3 Bed Bug Infestations Active –Live bed bugs –Eggs Inactive –Dead bed bugs –Blood spots –Fecal stains –Cast skins

4 Training Materials for a Detector Dogs (US Customs)

5 Training Steps Basic Retrieve Controlled Retrieve Buried Hides Food Reward

6 Station for Evaluating Canine Scent Detection PVC Tube PVC Cap with Hole Bed Bugs Inside Pill Cup with Perforated Lid

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11 Objectives Determine whether a dog can be trained to detect the scent of Cimex lectularius with a method giving food as a positive reward Determine whether dogs can differentiate between: -Other general household pests -Active from an inactive infestation Determine if dogs can locate bed bugs in hotel rooms

12 Materials and Methods  Scent Vials

13 Materials and Methods PVC Tube PVC Cap with Hole Scent Vial  Scent-detection stations

14 Data Positive indications False positive indications IACUC approval # E732

15 General Household Pest Experiment 4 dogs, 20 replicates per dog AntsRoaches 5 Live Bed Bugs Blank Termites ~ 1 meter

16 Bed Bug Detecting Canine

17 Differentiation Between General Household Pests

18 Bed Bug Materials Experiment 3 dogs, 20 replicates per dog ~ 1 meter Dead Bed Bugs Feces Cast Skins Blank Live Bed Bugs Viable Eggs Live Insects

19 Differentiation Between Bed Bug Materials

20 Hotel Field Experiment 3 vials male adults only- 1, 5, and 10 3 vials female adults only- 1, 5, and 10 2 hotel rooms: –One with only female vials –One with only male vials Randomly hidden in 17 possible locations 3 dogs, 6 replicates per dog

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22 Ability to Locate Bed Bugs in Hotel Rooms Vials Containing Females Vials Containing Males

23 Conclusions Dogs can be trained to detect the scent of Cimex lectularius Dogs differentiated –Bed bugs from other household pests –Active from inactive infestations Determined that dogs could locate bed bugs hotel rooms

24 Using a Bed Bug Dog


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