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Economic Impact of a Sedentary Lifestyle. Exercise and Body Composition The health care costs associated with obesity treatment were estimated at $117.

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Presentation on theme: "Economic Impact of a Sedentary Lifestyle. Exercise and Body Composition The health care costs associated with obesity treatment were estimated at $117."— Presentation transcript:

1 Economic Impact of a Sedentary Lifestyle

2 Exercise and Body Composition The health care costs associated with obesity treatment were estimated at $117 billion for In 2010, they were estimated at $168 billion (medical care only) with predictions of $300 billion in North America (US & Canada – medical care, lost productivity, disability)

3 Economic impact: Obesity is a multibillion dollar drain on the U.S. economy.

4 Economic Consequences of Inactivity Physical inactivity threatens to reverse the progress made in reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with many chronic conditions such as cardiovascular disease.  U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

5 Economic Consequences of Inactivity An inactive population is at both medical and financial risk for many chronic diseases: heart disease, stroke, colon cancer, diabetes, obesity, and osteoporosis.  U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

6 Economic Consequences of Inactivity Increasing prevalence of chronic medical conditions and diseases related to physical inactivity are associated with two types of costs.

7 Economic Consequences of Inactivity First, there are health care costs for preventative, diagnostic, and treatment services. physician visits, pharmaceuticals, ambulance services, rehabilitation services and hospital and nursing home care.  U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

8 Economic Consequences of Inactivity In addition, the value of lost wages by people unable to work because of illness and disability, as well as the value of future earnings lost by premature death. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

9 Cost per Person Obesity ($1400 medical expenses) Men = $2646 Women = $4879 Overweight Men = $432 Women = $524

10 Economic Consequences of Inactivity Medicare and Medicaid programs currently spend $84 billion annually on diabetes, heart disease, depression, cancer, and arthritis; conditions that could be significantly improved by increased physical activity.  U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

11 Financial Status Personal economics also plays a role. You get fatter in this country as you get poorer, thinner as you get richer.

12 Poorer = Fatter No supermarkets – difficult to find fresh fruits and vegetables. Fast food consumption. No safety equates with an indoor lifestyle Schools dropping PE Lack of outdoor recreational facilities

13 Financial Status Disparities in prevalence of overweight and obesity also exist based on socioeconomic status. 7 For all racial and ethnic groups combined, women of lower socioeconomic status (income 130 percent of the poverty threshold).  U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

14 Financial Status Men are about equally likely to be obese whether they are in a low or high socioeconomic group.  U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

15 Saving Money Since regular physical activity helps prevent disease and promote health, it may actually decrease health care costs. A study performed by researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that physically active people had, on average, lower annual direct medical costs than did inactive people.  U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

16 Saving Money The same study estimated that increasing regular moderate physical activity among the more than 88 million inactive Americans over the age of 15 years might reduce the annual national direct medical costs by as much as $76.6 billion in 2000 dollars. 21  U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

17 Saving Money Physically active people had fewer hospital stays and physician visits and used less medication than inactive people. Cost savings were consistent for men and women, for those with and without physical limitations, and even for smokers and nonsmokers.  U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

18 Saving Money Biggest difference in direct medical costs was among women 55 and older, supporting the belief that the potential gain associated with physical activity is especially high for older women.  U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

19 Saving Money Employers can benefit too. Workplace physical activity programs can reduce short-term sick leave by six to 32 percent, reduce health care costs by 20 to 55 percent, and increase productivity by 2 to 52 percent. 22  U.S. Department of Health and Human Services


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