Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Norway Team 4: Becky Tibbenham Charlotte Windberg Taylor Jameson Matt Byler.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Norway Team 4: Becky Tibbenham Charlotte Windberg Taylor Jameson Matt Byler."— Presentation transcript:

1 Norway Team 4: Becky Tibbenham Charlotte Windberg Taylor Jameson Matt Byler

2 Summary  Introduction to Norway  History  Demographics  Culture  Culture and Business  Government  The Economy  Business Schools

3

4 Norway: Climate  Varies from north to south and depends on elevation JanuaryJuly Oslo1962 Sognefjellhytta1342 Tromsø2553 Tromsø Oslo Sognefjellhytta

5 Natural Resources  Richly endowed with natural resources  Petroleum  Hydropower  Fish  Forestry  Minerals and mining  Highly dependent on petroleum sector  Accounts for half of all exports and 30%+ of total state revenue  Third-largest gas exporter in world  Down to 7 th globally in crude oil exporter as production declined

6 Environment  Environmental Problems  Water pollution  Acid rain  Air pollution  Government Response  “Norway is to be an international leader in environmental policy”  Working to achieve international agreement on climate change  Seeks global emissions cut 85% by 2050  Wants to ensure polar regions monitored closely

7 History  1814  Part of Denmark  Naval Blockade by King of Sweden  Declared an independent country  Joined with Sweden in union later in year  1905  Union was dissolved  Norway became fully independent

8 History  Remained neutral in both WWI and WWII, but occupied by German forces for most WWII  1960’s  Discovery of Oil and Gas reserves  Became very rich  Fund extensive social welfare system

9 Demographics  Death Rate: One of lowest in world(8.6 for 1,000)  Women Average Life: 83.1 years  Men Average Life: 78.6 years  Birth Rate:10.9 births for 1,000 people  Growth Rate: 0.33%

10 Demographics: Population

11

12 Demographics: Ethnic Groups  Five largest immigrant groups: Polish, Swedish, Pakistani, Iraqi, Somali  Other immigrant groups: Armenians, Greeks  Ethnic Issues  Integration: language problems  Employment: unusual names do not get interviews  Crime

13 Demographics: Class Structure  Welfare state  Equitable distribution of wealth  Responsibility for the less fortunate  Equal health care, pension, education  Norwegian values: people, environment  More equitable than in other countries

14 Demographics: Family Structure and Roles  Number of children: 75% have 1 or 2 siblings, 20% have 0  Waiting longer: Average age 26 (up 3 years from 1970)  Children live with biological parents  Not necessarily married  46% of children born to unwed parents (1995)  Parents more physically present  Maternity/Paternity Leave  Ten days of leave per year to care for child  Work-Life balance (less work hours)

15 Demographics: Religion  When born, automatically added to list of Protestant Christians unless “sign out” of the church.  When baptized, registered as members of Church of Norway  Many remain in church to use services, which have strong cultural standing  Baptism  Confirmation  Marriage  Burial

16 Demographics: Religion  Christianity: Evangelical Lutheran Church (82.7%)  Other religious or philosophical communities (8.6%)  Roman Catholics  Orthodox Christians  Jews  Hindus  Buddhists  Sikhs  Non-religious (8.7%)

17 Demographics: Religion  Least religious country in Western Europe  Statistics:  29% Believe in a church or deity  70% Say they have faith  32% Practice their faith  12% Attend church services each month  26% Atheist

18 Demographics: Education  Graduation Rates  Elementary: 100%  High School: 90% (within 5 years)  University: 70% attend, 41% graduate  Literacy Rate: 99%  Public education is free, so very few private schools

19 Demographics: Education  Higher Education:  Admissions: General University Admissions Certificate  Types of Colleges  Universities  University Colleges  Private Schools

20 Demographics: Education  Universities: 70 total institutions  7 universities  9 specialized universities  24 university colleges  Various private university colleges  Higher Education:  90% Public Institutions  10% Private Institutions

21 Demographics: Education  Private Institutions  Primarily in courses that have limited spots in public schools  Most are foundations, either autonomous or religious  Pay school fees equivalent to entire cost of education  Norwegian Loan Fund System  Apprenticeship Programs

22 Demographics: Employment  1980: less than half of Norwegian women were employed or active job seekers.  Since 1972, weekly work time for men has decreased by five hours (a.k.a. they work less)  1970s to 1983/1984 recession, unemployment near 2%  2009: unemployment was 3.2%

23 Demographic: Employment  Majority of adult population in Norway is employed.  70% women work  80% men work  2.3 million person labor market

24 Culture: Dimensions Kluckhohn & Strodtbeck

25 Culture: Dimensions Hofstede

26

27

28 Culture: Dimensions Trompenaar & Hampden-Turner

29 Norwegian Culture Specific Individualism Achievement SychronicInternal Universalism Mostly Neutral

30 Culture: Values  Individualistic society: comparable to U.S.  Value Hard work, honesty, modesty  Environment-friendly  Value animal protection  Health conscious

31 Culture: Values  Geographic position: Scandavia  Jante Law  High success and achievement negatively portrayed  Emphasis on collective success  Gives sense of modesty; Egalitarian outlook  Negative light on those who do not conform  Ironic because individualistic society

32 Culture: Customs  Greet with handshake, eye contact, smile  Gift giving only at Christmas or closing deal  Tipping not expected, but not uncommon  Holidays  Constitution Day: May 17  Christmas  New Year’s Eve  Midsummer’s Eve (Summer Solstice)  Easter (non-religious)

33 Culture: Communication  Language  Norwegian: 95% first language  Most fluent in English  Many speak Swedish, Danish, German, French, and Spanish  Topics  Avoid: government, culture, salary, family, personal background, complaints high cost of living  Okay: Norwegian culture, politics, nature, environment, current events, travel

34 Culture: Leisure & Arts  Sports  Skiing: National Sport  Handball  Soccer  Fishing: Deep sea, Freshwater  Hiking (autumn, late summer)  Dog Sledding (winter)  Scuba Diving  Mountain Climbing Handball

35 Culture: Leisure & Arts  Landscape Painters: Dahl, Kielland, Baker, Thaulow  Karveskurd (chip carving)  Rosemaling (rose painting)  Most Famous Artist: Edvard Munch “The Scream”

36 Culture: Food & Eating  Be punctual  No business discussion during casual dining  Table manners: use utensils  Toasts  Offer to help clean up  Reciprocate invitation

37 Culture and Business: Conflict & Negotiation  If possible, avoid conflict  If not possible, deal with directly or have mediator  Decisions by consensus  Cost-driven  Straight-to-the-point  No bargaining  No discounts  Commitments must be honored

38 Culture and Business: Ethics  2010 Freedom Score: 69.4 (37 th most free in world)  Transparency International Corruption Perception Index: 14 th of 179 countries  2010: 10 th least corrupt country in world (above US!)  Corrupt activity: criminal offense  Freedom to start, operate, and close a business  Starting business: average of 7 days (world average: 35)  Obtaining license: less than world average of 18 procedures  Bankruptcy: Simple and straightforward

39 Culture and Business: Impressions of Americans  Hollywood-like OR fat and lazy  Friendly but loud  Only interested in America  Convenient: Drive-thru restaurants  Shopping  These views are similar to what other European countries believe

40 Culture and Business: Impressions of American Businesses  Efficient  Individuality, imagination, initiative, inventive, independence of mind  Often approving: brainstorming Mecca  High regard  Students go to study in the US  Business schools going to American-style curriculum

41 Culture and Business: Business Relationships  Member of the European Free Trade Association (EFTA)  Founding member of General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT)  G10 group within WTO  Traditionally strongest trade relationships with closest geographic neighbors

42 Culture and Business: Business Relationships  Casual leadership culture  Low power distance  Less formal  Employees’ input valued  Egalitarian  Promotions: achievement  Leader’s Role: Harness talent of employees

43 Culture and Business: Management Practices  Values hard work  Motivating employees  Give challenging tasks  Benefits other than salary (tuition)  Organizational structure: Depends on size  Large: Hierarchy  Small: Flat

44 Culture and Business: Women in the Workplace  Strong presence: 50% of workforce  Government positions: 50% women  President of Parliament  Commissioner of Oslo Police  President of University of Oslo  Business positions:  Executives: 3.5% women  Middle Managers: 7.5% women  Work conflicts with “home duties”

45 Culture and Business: Human Resources Practices  Not well trained prior to employment  Classes very lecture-oriented  Few presentations compared to USA  Laws  No national minimum wage  Working Environment Act: Safety + Benefits  Recruiting: Interviews (similar to United States)  Promotions: Based on individual achievement

46 Culture and Business: Human Resources Practices  Compensation  Base salary  Vacation time: 21 days  Public Holidays  Sick time & Maternity leave  Disability  Extras: bonuses, company car, cell phone, newspaper  Pension  National: Required contribution from employer and employee  Company: Required defined benefit or defined contribution  New Law 2006: Based on years and salary

47 Culture and Business: Business Practice Norms  Similar to United States  Clothing dependent on individual company  Generally less formal  Business cards: given, but no distinct tradition  Work week  40 hours per week  9 hours per day  Overtime: 40%+ normal hourly rate  Sundays and Public Holidays are statutory holidays

48 Culture and Business: Business Practice Norms  Meetings  Plan early  Be on time!  Very little small talk  Very straightforward  At beginning, shake hands  Build trust: Don’t change project  Emphasize facts, benefits, and profitability  Show usefulness and technical quality  Keep deadlines

49 Culture and Business: Business Practice Norms  Dos & Don’ts  Do be on time  Do keep to your project’s schedule  Be careful about culture-related humor  Don’t give gifts excessively  Don’t give the hard sell  Don’t misinterpret their less expressive body language  Don’t interrupt the speaker  Don’t complain about the cost of living  Don’t smoke without asking

50 Government  Norway is a unitary constitutional monarchy  Parliamentary system  King of Norway is the head of state  Prime Minister is the head of government  Similar to UK  Welfare state

51 Government  Rights for people:  Free public health care free  Both parents get 12 months paid parental leave  Pension for everyone  All children right to kindergarten  All year olds right to 3 years of high school

52 Government: Legal System  Main Crime: Economic  Constitution  1814  Three branches: legislative, executive and judicial  Also mixture of:  Customary Law  Civil Law  Common Law

53 Government and Business  US and Norway friendly association  Foreign Policy Magazine ranks Norway last in its Failed States Index for 2009, so Norway is the world’s most well- functioning and stable country  Norway will remain among the richest countries in world for foreseeable future

54 Government and Business  Infrastructure  Domestic & International travel: airlines, buses, trains, car ferries to other European countries  Communications: mobile phone coverage, Internet usage  Technology  One of most advanced networks in Europe  Domestic Satellite System  Advancements in petroleum sector  Several higher education schools devoted to science and technology

55 Government and Business: Infrastructure Issues  Energy requirements  Electricity generation  99% from 27 million kilowatts of hydroelectric capacity  850 hydroelectric plants  Often exports electricity to western Europe  Top consumer of electricity in the world (per person)  Renewable Development (soil, biomass, wind)  Wind Farm Development  Off western coast  Invested $4 billion  4 major wind farms online in last 10 years

56 Government and Business: Infrastructure Issues  Road network most dense on east coast  Building roads and railroads difficult and expensive  Rugged terrain  Water traffic important in many places  Merchant Marine  Merchant Marine: 1831 vessels, one of largest in world  Oslo is the main port

57 Government and Business: Infrastructure Issues Tariffs: Rating of 10 in 1996, down to 4 in 2008

58 The Economy  Economy is a developed mixed economy with heavy state-ownership in strategic areas  Almost half of the GDP goes back to the national treasury and is distributed through the state budget. So through taxes, the government distributes money to the society through the state budget.

59 Economic Statistics (as of July 2010)

60 Economic Statistics (GDP Comparison)

61 Economic Statistics (GDP Per Capita Comparison)

62 Economic Statistics (GDP Sector Comparison)

63 Economy: Taxes  Income tax: 28%  Applies to all forms of income of the corporate bodies; Generally lower than EU average  VAT tax: 25% standard  14% for food and drinks  7% for move theater tickets and public transportation  Largest source of government revenue

64 Economy: Currency  Currency: Norwegian Kroner ($1 = 5.85 NOK)  Oslo Stock Exchange  Main market for trading in shares of Norwegian companies  Petro exchange: driven by oil

65 Economy: Main Industries  Shipping  Forestry  Petroleum  Fisheries  Agriculture has declined  Public sector among largest as percentage of GDP

66 Economy: Relationship with EU  Largest Trade Partner: EU  Growing stronger  Diminished trade barriers  EU becoming stronger  EU’s 4 th largest import partner  €91.85 billion  Behind only China, Russia, and United States  EU’s 6 th largest export partner  €43.58 billion  Behind United States, Russia, Switzerland, China, and Turkey

67 Economy: Imports and Exports  Imports  Machinery and equipment, chemicals, metals, foodstuffs  Main partners (2008): Sweden 14.3%, Germany 13.4%, Denmark 6.8%, China 6.4%, UK 5.9%, USA 5.4% Netherlands 4.1%  Exports  Petroleum and petroleum products, machinery and equipment, metals, chemicals, ships, fish  Main partners (2008): UK 27%, Germany 12.8%, Netherlands 10.4%, France 9.4%, Sweden 6.5%, US 4.5%

68 MBA Students  Marius Sebastian Ramnæs  Kine Sofie Espedal Knudsen  Frikk Aleksander Brynestad Stokke  Ann Sofi Grantangen Strysse

69 MBA Students: Business Schools  Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)  Norwegian School of Economics and Business Administration  Norwegian School of Management (BI)  Buskerud University

70 Norway vs. USA MBA Students Part-Time/Full-Time NorwayUSA Marius Full-time Matt Kine Full-time Taylor Frikk Full-time Becky Ann Full-time Charlotte

71 Norway vs. USA MBA Students Number of Languages NorwayUSA Marius 2 Norwegian & English 2 Spanish & English Matt Kine 2 Norwegian & English 2 Portuguese & English Taylor Frikk 2 Norwegian & English 1 (basic Arabic & Chinese) Becky Ann 2 Norwegian & English 2 Norwegian & English Charlotte

72 Norway vs. USA MBA Students Work Experience NorwayUSA Marius Grocery store cashier 4 years veterinarian technician Matt Kine 3 years in Shipping industry 3 years Agriculture Taylor Frikk Part-time, self- employed 3 years HR 1 yr teaching 1 yr Bus Intern Becky Ann 1 year as accountant Charlotte

73 Norway vs. USA MBA Students Concentration NorwayUSA Marius Control Theory General Business Matt Kine International Business General Business Taylor Frikk Finance Management Becky Ann General Business Charlotte

74 Norway vs. USA MBA Students Job Post-Graduation NorwayUSA Marius ManagementMedical School Matt Kine Continue in shipping industry Sales and Finance (international) Taylor Frikk Entrepreneurial Creative/Dyna mic Job HR or Educational Administration Becky Ann Business Manager Charlotte


Download ppt "Norway Team 4: Becky Tibbenham Charlotte Windberg Taylor Jameson Matt Byler."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google