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Title Page. Lesson Ten Romans 6:1-4 1 What shall we say then? Shall we continue in sin, that grace may abound? 2 God forbid. How shall we, that are dead.

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Presentation on theme: "Title Page. Lesson Ten Romans 6:1-4 1 What shall we say then? Shall we continue in sin, that grace may abound? 2 God forbid. How shall we, that are dead."— Presentation transcript:

1 Title Page

2 Lesson Ten

3 Romans 6:1-4 1 What shall we say then? Shall we continue in sin, that grace may abound? 2 God forbid. How shall we, that are dead to sin, live any longer therein? 3 Know ye not, that so many of us as were baptized into Jesus Christ were baptized into his death? 4 Therefore we are buried with him by baptism into death: that like as Christ was raised up from the dead by the glory of the Father, even so we also should walk in newness of life.

4 Romans 6:5-6 5 For if we have been planted together in the likeness of his death, we shall be also in the likeness of his resurrection: 6 Knowing this, that our old man is crucified with him, that the body of sin might be destroyed, that henceforth we should not serve sin.

5 Colossians 2: And ye are complete in him, which is the head of all principality and power: 11 In whom also ye are circumcised with the circumcision made without hands, in putting off the body of the sins of the flesh by the circumcision of Christ: 12 Buried with him in baptism, wherein also ye are risen with him through the faith of the operation of God, who hath raised him from the dead.

6 Colossians 2:13 13 And you, being dead in your sins and the uncircumcision of your flesh, hath he quickened together with him, having forgiven you all trespasses.

7 Acts 22:16 16 And now why tarriest thou? arise, and be baptized, and wash away thy sins, calling on the name of the Lord.

8 Focus Verse I Peter 3:21 The like figure whereunto even baptism doth also now save us (not the putting away of the filth of the flesh, but the answer of a good conscience toward God,) by the resurrection of Jesus Christ.

9 Focus Thought Baptism is essential to New Testament salvation, just as circumcision was important to the Hebrews’ covenant relationship with Jehovah.

10 Introduction Baptism is an essential step in the journey of salvation. It does not just place a person into a local assembly; it is part of the cleansing process of redemption. Baptism is as important to New Testament salvation as circumcision was to the Jew in the Old Testament.

11 Introduction Although scholars disagree concerning the full history of the use of water baptism, John the Baptist was clearly the first in the New Testament to commonly exercise this rite of initiation. Jesus embraced the principle of baptism, for He presented Himself to John for water baptism, and He further commissioned the practice of water baptism during His ministry. Moreover, the apostles obeyed the command of Christ and continued the practice of water baptism in the name of Jesus Christ.

12 Introduction Water baptism in the name of Jesus Christ associates a believer with the burial of Jesus. “Therefore we are buried with him by baptism into death: that like as Christ was raised up from the dead by the glory of the Father, even so we also should walk in newness of life” (Romans 6:4). Water baptism in the name of Jesus Christ is a type of burying and leaving behind our sins, rising from the watery grave to walk with Christ in new life. Truly, we are saved by baptism!

13 I. Baptism—Types and Shadows A Baptism—Types and Shadows in the Old Testament A.Circumcision: A Sign of Covenant God made a covenant with Abraham, and circumcision was the sign or symbol that he and his offspring were entering into the covenant. “This is my covenant, which ye shall keep, between me and you and thy seed after thee; Every man child among you shall be circumcised” (Genesis 17:10).

14 I. Baptism—Types and Shadows A It was to be performed when the male infant was eight days old. Moreover, God was clear that if a person did not obey this covenant, his “soul shall be cut off from his people” (Genesis 17:14).

15 I. Baptism—Types and Shadows A The practice of circumcision was not just an Old Testament ritual; it continued into the time of Christ and His disciples. John the Baptist was circumcised (Luke 1:59) as was Jesus Christ Himself (Luke 2:21). Further, the apostle Paul had his Greek new convert, Timothy, circumcised to avoid offending the Jews to whom he was ministering (Acts 16:3).

16 I. Baptism—Types and Shadows A Paul realized that Gentiles were not under the Jewish ordinances and therefore were not required to have all males circumcised. In Acts 15:1, men came from Judaea saying, “Except ye be circumcised after the manner of Moses, ye cannot be saved.” Consequently, Paul and Barnabas and the elders at Jerusalem held the first general conference to decide what they should do.

17 I. Baptism—Types and Shadows A There is safety in “the multitude of counsellors” and without it, “the people fall” (Proverbs 11:14). After the brethren had met to consider the matter, they stated, “For it seemed good to the Holy Ghost, and to us, to lay upon you no greater burden than these necessary things” (Acts 15:28). Clearly, when we meet to seek guidance and direction from God, He will give us understanding and wisdom through the Holy Ghost. Following the conference, Paul and Barnabas submitted to the counsel of the “apostles and elders” (Acts 15:6). They did not require circumcision of the new Gentile converts.

18 I. Baptism—Types and Shadows A Circumcision was important to the Old Testament Jews, but its fulfillment in the New Testament is even more important. Water baptism replaced the rite of physical circumcision, and it is an essential element of New Testament salvation. The apostle Paul described the essentiality of water baptism by stating that it is like “circumcision of the heart.”

19 Romans 2:28-29 II Timothy 2:2 “For he is not a Jew, which is one outwardly; neither is that circumcision, which is outward in the flesh: but he is a Jew, which is one inwardly; and circumcision is that of the heart, in the spirit, and not in the letter; whose praise is not of men, but of God” (Romans 2:28- 29).

20 II Corinthians 3:3 II Timothy 2:2 “Forasmuch as ye are manifestly declared to be the epistle of Christ ministered by us, written not with ink, but with the Spirit of the living God; not in tables of stone, but in fleshy tables of the heart” (II Corinthians 3:3).

21 I. Baptism—Types and Shadows A The circumcision of Christ is described as “putting off the body of the sins of the flesh” (Colossians 2:11). This is done by being “buried with him in baptism” (Colossians 2:12). This “spiritual circumcision” is “through the faith of the operation of God” (Colossians 2:12).

22 I. Baptism—Types and Shadows B B.The Ark: Eight Souls Saved by Water Clearly, Peter recognized the essentiality of water baptism in the name of Jesus Christ. After the Gentiles received the Holy Ghost in the home of Cornelius, Peter “commanded them to be baptized in the name of the Lord” (Acts 10:48). He later wrote of the essentiality of water baptism: “The like figure whereunto even baptism doth also now save us (not the putting away of the filth of the flesh, but the answer of a good conscience toward God,) by the resurrection of Jesus Christ” ” (I Peter 3:21).

23 I. Baptism—Types and Shadows B Peter compared the role of water baptism in salvation to the role of water in the salvation of Noah and his family on the ark. The water that put to death all of the unbelievers was the means of salvation for Noah and his family. They literally rose above the sin and death of this world and were “saved by water” (I Peter 3:20).

24 I. Baptism—Types and Shadows B The water does not cleanse us physically; it cleanses us spiritually. If baptism were only an option or only placed a person into a local assembly, why would Peter command baptism in Acts 10? Clearly, water baptism is vital!

25 I. Baptism—Types and Shadows C C.Israel: Baptized unto Moses in the Cloud and in the Sea Paul admonished the Corinthians not to be ignorant either by reason of misinformation or by disregard concerning the principle of baptism (I Corinthians 10:1-2). The cloud that represented the Spirit guided the Israelites through the wilderness, and their salvation from Egypt involved their passing “through the sea.” The Israelites went down into the sea and walked across and out on dry land into the Promised Land.

26 I. Baptism—Types and Shadows C Paul obviously saw these events as typical of the importance of water and Spirit baptism. We walk into the water of baptism from our sinful past and we arise out of the water with a promise of receiving the Holy Ghost, which introduces us to a brand new life.

27 I. Baptism—Types and Shadows C The phrase “baptized unto Moses” means that all the Israelites followed the example of Moses as he led them from Egypt into the will of God. This is the same example given by our Lord Jesus when He was baptized to “fulfil all righteousness” (Matthew 3:15). All the Israelites were “baptized unto Moses” and all believers should be baptized in the name of Jesus Christ (Acts 2:38). The Lord led His people from Egypt to the Promised Land through the waterway of the Red Sea, which became the way of their salvation from Egypt. Interestingly, He also has chosen the waterway as a point of essential salvation for us. There is no other way to receive remission of sins than through water baptism in the name of Jesus.

28 I. Baptism—Types and Shadows D D.The Brazen Laver: The Place of Washing The brazen laver was a basin filled with water that the priests used to wash their hands and their feet for purification before and during their conducting the ordinances of the Tabernacle or the Temple. As instructed by the Lord through Moses, the people made the laver from bronze mirrors taken from Egypt (Exodus 38:8). The laver was strategically placed between the altar and the Tabernacle.

29 I. Baptism—Types and Shadows D In Solomon’s Temple were ten bronze lavers on wheeled carts (I Kings 7:27-39). These carts were decorated with lions, oxen, and cherubim. However, the priests did not use these; they still used one laver, which was also called “the sea” (or the “bronze sea,” II Chronicles 4:6) and which could hold two thousand baths (I Kings 7:25-26), or about 14,000 gallons according to Fausset’s Bible Dictionary. The Temples of Zerubbabel and Herod had only a single laver.

30 I. Baptism—Types and Shadows D The brazen laver emphasized the importance of cleansing and typified water baptism in the New Testament.

31 II. Baptism—A New Testament Teaching A Baptism—A New Testament Teaching A.Preached by John the Baptist John the Baptist, the last Old Testament prophet, preached water baptism for all people as preparation to receive the Messiah (Isaiah 40:3; Matthew 3:3). John preached “baptism of repentance” (Mark 1:4), which gave insight to the reason for baptism.

32 Luke 3:3 II Timothy 2:2 “And he came into all the country about Jordan, preaching the baptism of repentance for the remission of sins” (Luke 3:3).

33 II. Baptism—A New Testament Teaching A The Scriptures are descriptive concerning water baptism, and they clearly define the way to be baptized. “And John also was baptizing in Aenon near to Salim, because there was much water there: and they came, and were baptized” (John 3:23). According to John, “much water” was necessary in order to baptize candidates. The Greek word baptizo means “to immerse, submerge; to make overwhelmed (i.e., fully wet).” Clearly, water baptism is to be done in water by immersion.

34 II. Baptism—A New Testament Teaching A John the Baptist was so called because of his doctrine of baptism. Baptism could never be biblically administered by sprinkling, for the meaning of the word itself would preclude such an idea. The idea of sprinkling came from the unbiblical practice of some who baptize infants. The Greek word for “sprinkling” is a different word, rhantizo. John gave us two important principles of baptism: (1)baptism is done in water by immersion, and (2)baptism is done for the remission of sins.

35 II. Baptism—A New Testament Teaching A In St. Paul’s Cathedral in Rome is a baptismal tank. Obviously, the early Catholics believed in water baptism by immersion.

36 II. Baptism—A New Testament Teaching A John 3:25 posed an interesting question: “Then there arose a question between some of John’s disciples and the Jews about purifying.” Though many commentators have given their opinions and ideas, it appears to most that the only difference in John’s baptism and baptism in the infant church was the name that was called over the candidates in baptism. This seems evident by the rebaptism of the disciples of John in Ephesus by the apostle Paul (Acts 19:4-5).

37 II. Baptism—A New Testament Teaching B B.Commissioned by Jesus Jesus Christ and His disciples baptized people as did John the Baptist. Some have questioned whether our Lord baptized people. The author of the entry under baptism in New Unger’s Bible Dictionary answers the question well: “That Christ Himself baptized His disciples is a matter, to say the least, involved in doubt. Although it is probable that at the beginning of His ministry our Lord baptized those who believed in Him, He not long afterward delegated this work to His disciples (John 4:1-2).”

38 II. Baptism—A New Testament Teaching B The Scriptures are clear that Jesus commanded water baptism (Matthew 28:19) and that He and His disciples baptized more believers than John had baptized.

39 John 4:1-2 II Timothy 2:2 “When therefore the Lord knew how the Pharisees had heard that Jesus made and baptized more disciples than John, (though Jesus himself baptized not, but his disciples,)” (John 4:1-2).

40 II. Baptism—A New Testament Teaching B The Gospels of Matthew and Mark both record that our Lord commissioned His disciples to baptize (Matthew 28:18-20; Mark 16:15-20). In the Book of Luke, the word baptize does not appear in His commission, but the principle and reason for water baptism is there: “Remission of sins should be preached in his name among all nations, beginning at Jerusalem” (Luke 24:47). The commission given by Jesus in these passages is “an authorization or command to act in a prescribed manner” or “to act for, in behalf of, or in place of another.”

41 II. Baptism—A New Testament Teaching B Bible scholars sometimes call Matthew 28:19 the “Last Commission” because of its timing near the conclusion of Christ’s earthly ministry. It contained “commands in a prescribed manner”; however, it was not a baptismal service. It was a time of instruction to His disciples. Further, Matthew 28:19-20 does not record the last words of our Lord, for the last words of Jesus prior to His ascension are recorded in Acts 1:4-9.

42 II. Baptism—A New Testament Teaching C C.Pattern Initiated at Pentecost The disciples were already baptized by water, and at Pentecost they were filled with the Holy Ghost. The Lord described this experience in John 7:38 as “rivers of living water” flowing from within a person. John 7:39 plainly reveals that Jesus was speaking of receiving the Holy Ghost.

43 II. Baptism—A New Testament Teaching C When people heard of the unusual events in the upper room, they began to come to see for themselves what was happening. They witnessed believers speaking with other tongues as they received the Holy Ghost.

44 II. Baptism—A New Testament Teaching C As the apostle Peter preached the message of Jesus Christ to those who came, the Holy Ghost convicted their hearts and they asked, “What shall we do?” Peter was ready to answer them, for the Lord had prepared him for this occasion when He gave Peter “the keys of the kingdom of heaven” (Matthew 16:19). Peter stood and preached to the gathered crowd the clear and concise message for redemption: “Repent, and be baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ for the remission of sins, and ye shall receive the gift of the Holy Ghost” (Acts 2:38).

45 II. Baptism—A New Testament Teaching C Following the Pentecostal upper room service, the disciples baptized about three thousand individuals, and the church grew (Acts 2:41-47). This was the pattern of the New Testament church.

46 II. Baptism—A New Testament Teaching D D.Practiced by the Apostles Everywhere the disciples preached the gospel, they always baptized their converts. In addition to the three thousand souls baptized at Pentecost (Acts 2:41), the Lord added many others to the church daily (Acts 2:47). The Scriptures reveal that the disciples proceeded to baptize these new believers.

47 II. Baptism—A New Testament Teaching D Philip went to Samaria and “baptized, both men and women” (Acts 8:12). Following Philip’s baptismal service, Peter and John came to Samaria and laid their hands on the Samaritans, and they received the Holy Ghost (Acts 8:14-17). Later, as Philip traveled from Samaria, he met an Ethiopian; and after talking to him about salvation, Philip baptized him (Acts 8:36-38).

48 II. Baptism—A New Testament Teaching D In Acts 10:44-48 the apostle Peter preached to those gathered in the house of Cornelius, and “the Holy Ghost fell on all them which heard the word.” They spoke with tongues and Peter “commanded them to be baptized in the name of the Lord.” Clearly, Peter did not view baptism as optional with regard to salvation.

49 II. Baptism—A New Testament Teaching D In Acts 19 the apostle Paul found some of John the Baptist’s disciples at Ephesus. After questioning them about their baptism and finding that they were baptized according to John’s baptism, he rebaptized them in the name of Jesus. “When they heard this, they were baptized in the name of the Lord Jesus” (Acts 19:5).

50 III. Baptism—The Benefits A Baptism— The Benefits A.To Fulfill “All” Righteousness It is important to note the events concerning the baptism of Jesus. Jesus came from Galilee to the Jordan River where John the Baptist was baptizing. When Jesus asked John to baptize Him, John replied that he should not be baptizing Jesus but that Jesus should baptize him. According to the Book of Matthew, the Lord told John, “Suffer it to be so now: for thus it becometh us to fulfil all righteousness. Then he suffered him” (Matthew 3:15).

51 III. Baptism—The Benefits A The word that is translated as righteousness in the King James Version refers to “the state of him who is such as he ought to be, righteousness.... the doctrine concerning the way in which man may attain to a state approved of God” (Thayer’s Greek Lexicon). Righteousness is a complex attribute of God’s character. Further, the Old Testament revealed that doing the commandments of the Lord affects “our righteousness.”

52 Deuteronomy 6:25 II Timothy 2:2 “And it shall be our righteousness, if we observe to do all these commandments before the L ORD our God, as he hath commanded us” (Deuteronomy 6:25).

53 III. Baptism—The Benefits B B.For the Remission of Sins The Greek word aphesis, translated “remission,” means “freedom; (figuratively) pardon” (Strong’s Concordance). In other words, it involves freedom from sin. Luke used the word in Acts 2:38 where he wrote that baptism is for the “remission” of sins. In other words, through water baptism in the name of Jesus Christ we receive freedom and pardon from sin.

54 III. Baptism—The Benefits B When a person suffers from cancer, he longs to hear from his physician that the cancer has gone into “remission.” When cancer is in remission it means that the individual is experiencing freedom from the active effects of the cancer.

55 III. Baptism—The Benefits B Through water baptism we have the opportunity to be delivered or cleansed from sin. In recounting his conversion experience, Paul recalled the words of Ananias when he told Paul to “be baptized, and wash away thy sins, calling on the name of the Lord” (Acts 22:16). The washing of water baptism brings about the “remission of sins.”

56 III. Baptism—The Benefits C C.To Identify Us with Christ’s Burial In Romans 6 the apostle Paul described baptism as being buried with Christ “by baptism into death.” Just as our Lord was placed in a tomb, so must we be buried symbolically, signifying the end of our sinful past. The watery grave is where our sins are buried, which is one of the reasons that water baptism is by immersion. No person is buried with only a few grains of sand sprinkled or poured on him. One must be covered to be buried.

57 III. Baptism—The Benefits C “Knowing this, that our old man is crucified with him, that the body of sin might be destroyed, that henceforth we should not serve sin. For he that is dead is freed from sin” (Romans 6:6-7).

58 III. Baptism—The Benefits C In the same chapter of Romans, Paul also referred to baptism as being planted (Romans 6:5). He compared baptism to a seed that is planted. The seed is buried and seems to be dead, but it is not. There is life within the seed that soon will reveal itself with a sprout of new life. What consolation we have after baptism! “Now if we be dead with Christ, we believe that we shall also live with him” (Romans 6:8).

59 IV. Baptism—The Apostolic Pattern of the Name A Baptism—The Apostolic Pattern of the Name A.At Pentecost At Pentecost the apostle Peter fully understood his role—the man with the keys of the kingdom of heaven (Matthew 16:19). He had been entrusted with the responsibility to reveal God’s plan for the redemption of mankind. Peter received this role after understanding the divine identity of Jesus. (See Matthew 16:16-19.) His understanding of this bedrock doctrine of truth was the “rock” on which the church was to be built.

60 IV. Baptism—The Apostolic Pattern of the Name A It was no accident that when the crowd asked, “What shall we do?” Peter replied, “Repent, and be baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ for the remission of sins, and ye shall receive the gift of the Holy Ghost” (Acts 2:38). Clearly, God had a definite plan for redemption!

61 IV. Baptism—The Apostolic Pattern of the Name A In his first epistle, Peter continued to demonstrate his understanding of the “rock.” He quoted from Isaiah 28:16: “Behold, I lay in Sion a chief corner stone, elect, precious: and he that believeth on him shall not be confounded” (I Peter 2:6). This “stone” was none other than Jesus Christ.

62 IV. Baptism—The Apostolic Pattern of the Name B B.At Samaria Philip went to Samaria and preached. It is interesting that he preached two fundamental subjects: (1) the things concerning the kingdom of God and (2) the name of Jesus Christ (Acts 8:12). After the Samaritans believed Philip’s teaching, “they were baptized, both men and women.... in the name of the Lord Jesus” (Acts 8:12-16).

63 IV. Baptism—The Apostolic Pattern of the Name C C.At Caesarea At the house of Cornelius in Caesarea, Peter asked, “Can any man forbid water, that these should not be baptized, which have received the Holy Ghost as well as we?” (Acts 10:47). He knew that the Jews would be reluctant to receive the Gentiles into the church because of the longstanding prejudice and separation between the two groups. However, it only seemed appropriate to baptize them in Jesus’ name since the Lord had filled them with the Holy Spirit.

64 IV. Baptism—The Apostolic Pattern of the Name C This setting was the first-known, recorded occasion in which individuals received the Holy Ghost prior to being baptized in Jesus’ name. The Gentiles believed and exercised faith as Peter was preaching and they received the Spirit. Apparently, no one opposed Peter’s challenge, and he commanded the Gentiles to be baptized in the name of the Lord. (See Acts 10:48.)

65 IV. Baptism—The Apostolic Pattern of the Name D D.At Ephesus Apollos came to Corinth, and God blessed his ministry so much that Paul felt he should move on to Ephesus. Paul was not jealous of Apollos (I Corinthians 1:12) but thankful that he (Paul) was a part of the “planting” and that Apollos was part of the “watering” process in the work of God. When Paul arrived at Ephesus, he found a group of disciples. He questioned them as to whether or not they had received the Holy Ghost after believing, but they did not know what he was talking about. Paul then instructed them in the way of salvation.

66 IV. Baptism—The Apostolic Pattern of the Name D Paul asked, “Unto what then were ye baptized?” (Acts 19:3). He was inquiring concerning the name invoked over them at baptism. They replied, “Unto John’s baptism.” Since they had not been baptized in Jesus’ name, Paul rebaptized them “in the name of the Lord Jesus” (Acts 19:5).

67 Reflections Someone stated that a person does the repenting, the church does the baptizing, and God fills with the Holy Ghost. Baptism is just as essential as any other part of one’s salvation journey. Though it is a one-time rite in the life of an individual, like circumcision, it must be carried out biblically for it to do its intended work of circumcising the heart.

68 Reflections Remission of sins is necessary. If a believer does not have his sins remitted, he will continue to live with sins that drag and weigh him down. But a person’s sins are washed away only when the name of the Lord is called over him in water baptism; it is the divine plan of God. No other name can cleanse a person from sin.

69 Reflections “Neither is there salvation in any other: for there is none other name under heaven given among men, whereby we must be saved” (Acts 4:12).


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