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Chapter 17 Section 1 Mining and Railroads Objectives Explain how the discovery of gold and silver affected the West. Describe life in the western mining.

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Presentation on theme: "Chapter 17 Section 1 Mining and Railroads Objectives Explain how the discovery of gold and silver affected the West. Describe life in the western mining."— Presentation transcript:

1 Chapter 17 Section 1 Mining and Railroads Objectives Explain how the discovery of gold and silver affected the West. Describe life in the western mining towns. Examine how railroads spread and helped the West to develop.

2 Chapter 17 Section 1 Mining and Railroads Terms and People vigilante – self-appointed law keeper subsidy – grant of land or money transcontinental railroad – railroad line that spanned the continent

3 Chapter 17 Section 1 Mining and Railroads How did mining and railroads draw people to the West? In 1865, the American frontier stretched from the Mississippi River to the Pacific Ocean. Drawn by hopes for a new life, people moved west by the thousands. west

4 Chapter 17 Section 1 Mining and Railroads The California gold rush of 1849 captured the American imagination. Before long, miners were racing into the Sierra Nevada, the Rockies, and the Black Hills, searching for gold. Gold!

5 Chapter 17 Section 1 Mining and Railroads In 1859, prospectors struck gold at a find that became known as the Comstock Lode. Comstock Lode located in Sierra Nevada contained both gold and silver was one of the world ’ s richest silver mines made Nevada a center of mining

6 Chapter 17 Section 1 Mining and Railroads After the Civil War ended, more and more prospectors rushed west. New discoveries seemed to be popping up everywhere. Montana Idaho South Dakota Colorado Alaska

7 Chapter 17 Section 1 Mining and Railroads With each new find, miners rushed to the site. Others soon followed, bringing supplies and opening stores. Mining camps quickly grew from tent cities to boomtowns.

8 Chapter 17 Section 1 Mining and Railroads People from around the world poured into the boomtowns. Women, too, joined the mining boom, making money by opening restaurants and other businesses. Nearly half of the miners were foreign-born, from places such as Ireland, Italy, Germany, Spain, and China.

9 Chapter 17 Section 1 Mining and Railroads Few prospectors, however, struck it rich. Mining underground was difficult and expensive. Many miners eventually sold their claims to large mining companies. Profits prospectorsmining companies Profits

10 Chapter 17 Section 1 Mining and Railroads Many boomtowns grew so fast that they had no real government. Vigilantes often imposed their own form of justice. As populations grew, some areas organized into territories subject to U.S. laws. U.S. Territories Colorado Dakota Nevada Arizona Idaho Montana

11 Chapter 17 Section 1 Mining and Railroads The mining boom helped create a railroad boom. Before 1860, railroad lines ended at the Mississippi River. To encourage westward expansion, the government gave subsidies to the railroads to build new tracks. west

12 Chapter 17 Section 1 Mining and Railroads Many of the new lines led to the boomtowns of the West.

13 Chapter 17 Section 1 Mining and Railroads The railroads also began work to fulfill a longtime goal — to build a transcontinental railroad that would stretch from coast to coast. Two railroads won the right to build from opposite directions, eventually meeting in the middle. Central Pacific Union Pacific

14 Chapter 17 Section 1 Mining and Railroads The Central Pacific headed east from Sacramento. The Union Pacific headed west from Omaha.

15 Chapter 17 Section 1 Mining and Railroads Bad weather and the rugged terrain made work difficult and dangerous.

16 Chapter 17 Section 1 Mining and Railroads It took thousands of workers and many years to complete the job. Laborers came from many countries around the world — including China.

17 Chapter 17 Section 1 Mining and Railroads Finally, on May 10, 1869, the two lines met at Promontory, Utah.

18 Chapter 17 Section 1 Mining and Railroads The new railroad lines brought even more settlers west. Several new states were soon carved from the rapidly growing region. Nevada1864 Colorado1876 North Dakota1889 South Dakota1889 Montana1889 Washington1889 Idaho1890 Wyoming1890

19 Chapter 17 Section 1 Mining and Railroads Section Review Know It, Show It QuizQuickTake Quiz


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