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Standards VISION The vision of the Media Center is to provide equitable access to resources so that all students can become skilful producers and consumers.

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Presentation on theme: "Standards VISION The vision of the Media Center is to provide equitable access to resources so that all students can become skilful producers and consumers."— Presentation transcript:

1 Standards VISION The vision of the Media Center is to provide equitable access to resources so that all students can become skilful producers and consumers of information. The Media Center will empower students to become ethical and independent life-long learners in a competitive, technological world. The Media Center environment will be student-friendly and encourage students to read for fun. The Media Center will also be a support for staff by providing professional development using best practices in instruction and collaboration opportunities to support both student literacy skills and content knowledge, leading to improved performance. MISSION The mission of the media program is to enable students and staff to effectively evaluate and use ideas and information to increase student curiosity and achievement beyond the school walls. Resume

2 Sarah Bourgeois’ Exit Portfolio Welcome to my SLM Portfolio. This portfolio is designed for the McDaniel School Library Media Program and organized according to the four AASL/NCATE Standards for Professional Preparation Programs for School Library Media Specialists. American Association of School Librarians’ Information Power identifies the four roles of a SLM. As you go through this portfolio, please look for evidence of my:  role as (a) information specialist, (b) teacher, (c) instructional xxpartner, and (d) program administrator;  reflection on practice;  integration of standards;  personal growth. To navigate this electronic portfolio, click on the individual links throughout the presentation to navigate to the desired pages. The best place to begin is the Table of Contents. There you will find links to all of the following elements: Overviews of all four of AASL’s certification standards Reflection statements and artifacts for all thirteen related objectives to the AASL standards My professional resume. Feel free to contact me about anything concerning this portfolio at Click Here to Move to the Table of Contents.

3 Table of Contents  Introduction Introduction  Resume Resume  Standard One Standard One  Efficient and Ethical Information-Seeking Behavior Efficient and Ethical Information-Seeking Behavior  Literacy and Reading Literacy and Reading  Access to Information Access to Information  Stimulating Learning Environment Stimulating Learning Environment  Standard Two Standard Two  Knowledge of Learners and Learning Knowledge of Learners and Learning  Effective and Knowledgeable Teacher Effective and Knowledgeable Teacher  Information Literacy Curriculum Information Literacy Curriculum  Standard Three Standard Three  Connection with the Library Community Connection with the Library Community  Instructional Partner Instructional Partner  Educational Leader Educational Leader  Standard Four Standard Four  Managing Information Resources: Selecting, Organizing, Using Managing Information Resources: Selecting, Organizing, Using  Managing Program Resources: Human, Financial, Physical Managing Program Resources: Human, Financial, Physical  Comprehensive and Collaborative Strategic Planning and Assessment Comprehensive and Collaborative Strategic Planning and Assessment Sarah Bourgeois’ Portfolio || Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||Opening Page Table of Contents Standard 1 Standard 2 Standard 3 Standard 4

4 Standard One USE OF INFORMATION & IDEAS Sarah Bourgeois' Portfolio Related Objectives to Standard 1 Click on the links below to navigate to the different objectives with their related artifacts and reflection statements: Efficient and Ethical Information-Seeking Behavior Literacy and Reading Access to Information Stimulating Learning Environment || Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||Opening Page Table of Contents Standard 1 Standard 2 Standard 3 Standard 4

5 Standard One USE OF INFORMATION & IDEAS Efficient and Ethical Information-Seeking Behavior Candidates model and teach legal and ethical practices. Sarah Bourgeois' Portfolio Take the whole range of imaginative literature, and we are all wholesale borrowers. In every matter that relates to invention, to use, or beauty or form, we are borrowers. - Wendell Phillips In the information era students no longer have the challenge of accessing information, but instead have to sift through it. It is up to the Media Specialist to model and teach legal and ethical practices as students learn how to find and cite credible sources. With the creation of a copyright handout for teachers, an online student form for Bibliography reliability and WJ’s Academic Integrity Code, students and teachers at Walter Johnson can operate on a common legal and ethical standard for the utilization of sources. The artifacts not only help prevent issues by teaching students about citations and what constitutes cheating, but also inform teachers how to help their students recognize plagiarism and help the students to cite the ideas of others. The key with maintaining academic integrity and teaching students to cite their sources is to be proactive. This way we are teaching a skill that accompanies the teaching of content instead of setting up “gothcha” moments once we catch students plagiarizing or copying another’s work. To be proactive, I would inform teachers about plagiarism by giving them the “Internet Plagiarism” handout. This artifact addresses what plagiarism is, who does it, why they do it, how to avoid it, how to determine if students have plagiarized, and what to do when it happens. To my surprise, teachers also didn’t know how easy it was for students to copy work or the resources they had available to combat it. This led me to add information on the handout about This part of the handout was created to give teachers a resource that allows them to see how much of a students’ assignment isn’t in the student’s own voice. || Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||Opening Page Table of Contents Standard 1 Standard 2 Standard 3 Standard 4 Part I Copyright handoutCopyright handout Online Bibliography formOnline Bibliography form Academic Integrity CodeAcademic Integrity Code Reflection Part II Reflection Part III

6 Standard One USE OF INFORMATION & IDEAS Efficient and Ethical Information-Seeking Behavior Candidates model and teach legal and ethical practices. Sarah Bourgeois' Portfolio As a Media Specialist, I would show teachers how to use turnitin.com as a teaching tool instead of a punitive measure. In order to teach students to cite sources both teachers and Media Specialists can work collaboratively to scaffold the students’ understanding. Using the Bibliography Reliability Survey, students can be given an article that relates to content and discuss the importance of the citation, including credibility, currency, relevancy and accuracy of sources used. At this point, the teacher can discuss the Code of Academic Integrity set forth by WJ and discuss why it’s important to cite sources. At a later time, the Media Specialist can require students to find their own article that relates to course content and require students to properly cite it. The last assignment will make the student find their own article that matches all criteria including content, credibility, currency, relevancy and accuracy of sources used and an accurate citation. The teaching of legal and ethical practices begins with defining ethical use of information. In 2005, I took part in the Academic Integrity Committee to address an issue that had become a problem at Walter Johnson; the culture of cheating. We had to determine what policy we wanted to uphold in our school by defining what we considered an academic integrity violation. We also had to work with the administration to determine the consequences that would be used in such situations. Now, students and parents must sign the form stating they are aware of the policy and return it to school. When discussing the Code of Academic Integrity with students, I realized that I overestimated the degree to which they knew they were copying work in an unethical way. || Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||Opening Page Table of Contents Standard 1 Standard 2 Standard 3 Standard 4 Part II Copyright handoutCopyright handout Online Bibliography formOnline Bibliography form Academic Integrity CodeAcademic Integrity Code Reflection Part I Reflection Part III

7 Standard One Copyright handoutCopyright handout Online Bibliography formOnline Bibliography form Academic Integrity CodeAcademic Integrity Code Reflection Part I Reflection Part II USE OF INFORMATION & IDEAS Efficient and Ethical Information-Seeking Behavior Candidates model and teach legal and ethical practices. Sarah Bourgeois' Portfolio I assumed students knew what cheating was and chose to do it because it was easier. With this knowledge, the next step I could see taking in this endeavor is to have students make a video of things that count as cheating and ways they can appropriately use copyrighted information. I could make an informative and funny video that would use our mascots to show students examples of cheating. We could play it on the morning announcements and during the freshman orientation in the Media Center. By using the artifacts in creative, positive and proactive ways, I will be modeling and teaching legal and ethical practices to both teachers and students. || Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||Opening Page Table of Contents Standard 1 Standard 2 Standard 3 Standard 4 Part III

8 Standard One Sarah Bourgeois' Portfolio Reading promo flierReading promo flier Reflection Part II USE OF INFORMATION & IDEAS Literacy and Reading Candidates select materials in multiple formats to address the needs and interests of diverse young readers and learners. || Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||Opening Page Table of Contents Standard 1 Standard 2 Standard 3 Standard 4 “The things I want to know are in books; my best friend is the man who'll get me a book I ain't read.” – A. Lincoln The Walter Johnson community has great parent involvement, mostly highly- motivated students, dynamic teachers, and forward–thinking administrators. The principal is very supportive of the media program and is aware of the roles that a media specialist has including the selection of materials. In accordance to our School Improvement Plan to support minority and struggling students, I plan to promote reading by working with administration, students, teachers and the community to purchase resources that meet the needs of diverse young readers and learners. The research of Kenney and Barak (2006) showed that nearly 16% of teens never visit their school libraries. This statistic is maintained even though many students have to visit the library with a class. I believe that more students use the library at Walter Johnson than the study finds because our students are often brought in by their teachers during class. The area where we need to encourage more diverse learners is with encouraging more boys to read. This was evidenced in the Walter Johnson Book Club where there was one boy and nine girls. The boy dropped out after the book choices were Twilight and the Jane Austin books! But, disparity of boy readers can be changed. Based on observational data and research studies in the field, I need to focus the purchasing of materials for male readers. The way to encourage male readers is to have books that they like and to advertise those books. My artifact, a reading promotion flier, was made to encourage young adults to read for pleasure. Part I

9 Standard One Sarah Bourgeois' Portfolio USE OF INFORMATION & IDEAS Literacy and Reading Candidates select materials in multiple formats to address the needs and interests of diverse young readers and learners. || Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||Opening Page Table of Contents Standard 1 Standard 2 Standard 3 Standard 4 This is even a challenge in a school like Walter Johnson because students already have a lot of mandatory reading, especially in the higher level classes. The pressure of a tough workload seems to cause students to stop reading for pleasure. When making my reading suggestions I tailor lists to a list of books in which some will appeal to girls and others to boys. Boys have different preferences than girls, including a love of fantasy, science fiction, and comics. The other piece of the flier to note is the fact that it is not just a list of books, but includes websites, movies and computer software that relate to the topic. This is important because boys tend to be more kinesthetic in their learning. The theme of my fliers is Rock N’ Roll. With Guitar Hero being so popular now, I would post the fliers relating to topics that boys would be interested in, like music. I would also post the fliers in places sure to catch a boy’s attention like the boys’ bathroom and not just in the library. One thing I learned from this experience is that we not only do we need to encourage boys to read, but we need to include what they like to read into the collection. We aren’t going to change what they like to read, so they should read what they enjoy (Sullivan, 2004). For example, boys tend to enjoy more non-fiction and science-fiction than females. In the future I can envision using other promotional methods involving attractive displays, book talking, and working with teachers to weave such resources into their the curriculum. Lastly, I would use technology to analyze circulation statistics to see if my efforts have been successful. Part II Reading promo flierReading promo flier Reflection Part I References Kenney, B. and Barack, L. (2006). Libraries Loosing Teens. School Library Journal. 1, Retrieved July 1, 2008, from om/article/CA html. om/article/CA html Sullivan, M. (2004). Why Johnny Won't Read. School Library Journal, 8, Retrieved July 1, 2008, from om/article/CA html?q=hig h+school%2C+reading+habits. om/article/CA html?q=hig h+school%2C+reading+habits

10 Standard One Sarah Bourgeois' Portfolio Orientation video Reflection Part II Reflection Part II USE OF INFORMATION & IDEAS Access to Information Candidates plan strategically to ensure physical and intellectual access to information for the entire school community. || Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||Opening Page Table of Contents Standard 1 Standard 2 Standard 3 Standard 4 “Perhaps no place in any community is so totally democratic as the town library. The only entrance requirement is interest.” - Lady Bird Johnson With Walter Johnson High School being under construction, it is hard enough to find the library let alone the resources within it. Because of this, I created a video that shows the location of all resources that are in the Media Center. This video highlights the careful plans that had been made in the physical access to resources as well as some of the intellectual material that is available. Both teachers and students of all grade levels are not all aware of the location of resources or what resources are available to them in the library. In the video, the school’s mascots can be seen using features of the library that even upper classmen aren’t aware of, like where you can access information on citing sources. The video also lets teachers know that you can watch the announcements and videos in the library. This way, teachers don’t feel restricted in bringing a class down during a period when announcements are run. This video is just one component of encouraging the WJ community to use the library’s resources. I would also play this video while hosting staff orientation during the first week of professional days. To meet the needs of the greater community, I envision running orientation sessions during Back to School Night. In addition to content-support tables I would have a table on graphic novels and AP review materials as well as computers set up with different resources on them, including websites labeled based on classes that tend to use them for projects, for example the AP Psychology classes tend to use Proquest. Part I

11 Standard One Sarah Bourgeois' Portfolio USE OF INFORMATION & IDEAS Access to Information Candidates plan strategically to ensure physical and intellectual access to information for the entire school community. || Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||Opening Page Table of Contents Standard 1 Standard 2 Standard 3 Standard 4 If available, I will also put sample project requirements and student exemplars by the computers displayed in plastic displays that stand up. From this endeavor, I learned that I needed to take into consideration the how I was going to show the video. As a Media Specialist, I would work with the English teachers to create a freshman orientation in which students would learn how they can access resources not only in the Media Center but from home. Afterwards, I would have students practice using a variety of resources including videos, books (non-fiction, fiction). Students, along with the people in their group, would work to figure out where the items go back in the library. However, instead of actually shelving the items, students would place items on shelves located in front of each sections. Additionally, the video would provide a method of review for returning students, and even provide helpful guidance to returning and new staff members. To access the rest of the students and staff in the school, I would simply play the video at the end of the morning announcements so that they could see many of the uses and locations of things. The most important intellectual access that I would work on with the parents is the use of edline. I would post books that are new to the library, including the Black Eyed Susan Books with a short synopsis per book. I would advertise the Book Club as well as any projects that are being done in the library. If we get any new resources, I will also showcase them and some ideas on how to use them by ing the community. The multi-layered approach would allow me to access the different members of our educational community by teaching all students, staff and community members about what the library has to offer. This fits in with my philosophy to ensure that all members have equal access to information. Part II Orientation video Reflection Part I Reflection Part I

12 Media Center DesignMedia Center Design Reflection Part II Reflection Part II USE OF INFORMATION & IDEAS Stimulating Learning Environment Candidates plan and organize library media centers according to their use by the learning community. || Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||Opening Page Table of Contents Standard 1 Standard 2 Standard 3 Standard 4 “Great blends of pattern, like great dishes, must be carefully tasted. And constant tasting is what teaches a cook how to taste.” -Billy Baldwin Some aspects of our library at Walter Johnson are already conducive to maximize use of the library. It is well located in the building; near to classrooms a computer lab, and a TV studio. As a future Media Specialist, I have created an ideal design that organizes the media center so that all members of the community can be served. The library at Walter Johnson is in an ideal location for after-hours delivery of materials because it is on an outside wall. In order to get ideas for the ideal internal set up, I visited three schools, Churchill, Richard Montgomery and Northwest, to create my ideal Media Center Design Artifact. In comparing Walter Johnson to other high schools in the area, I was able to come up with a plan that included some changes in our current setup. One ideal change would be if there was a teacher workroom nearby. Since there isn’t, it is important for the Media Specialist to make use of the meeting rooms so that staff members are encouraged to use the center and will see resources even if they aren’t there to seek them out. One benefit to discussing the floor plan with current Media Specialists was that they were able to explain their greatest challenges with their layout. This allowed me to think about how I would handle the same issues. Some of the challenges included not having great visibility in all areas of the library. To fix this, large mirrors were affixed to the ceiling. The other challenged experienced was having bookshelves that are too high for students to pull resources off of. The way that this could be fixed is by using those shelves as display areas for student work and increased signage. Part I Standard One Sarah Bourgeois' Portfolio

13 Standard One Sarah Bourgeois' Portfolio USE OF INFORMATION & IDEAS Stimulating Learning Environment Candidates plan and organize library media centers according to their use by the learning community. || Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||Opening Page Table of Contents Standard 1 Standard 2 Standard 3 Standard 4 There were many ideas that Media Specialists had that I would implement in my library because they increase students’, teachers’, and community members’ use of the library recreationally, on project completion, as a place for meetings and class lessons, as well as for computer use. I liked the idea of placing some magazines down on the table instead of having all of the magazines catalogued and on shelves because this would lead to more students thumbing through them. One great idea was to promote the library outside of the library. This was done with Read Posters, recommended reading lists in the bathrooms, and displays in cases outside the library. In addition, I liked the curricular connections made at Richard Montgomery as seen in the vocabulary on the walls. This not only shows students that the information they learn in class is still relevant when they leave, but it also shows collaboration between Media Specialist and teachers from varying departments. One thing that I learned from this project is that although exciting to plan an ideal Media Center you are often confined by other requirements of the builder or by finances. So, many of the ideas that I pulled from the libraries were things that seemed feasible with a limited budget. I realized that creating space to allow for multiple activities to happen simultaneously was important to Media Specialists and teachers alike. My floor plan is organized into sections devoted to quiet and comfortable reading as well as two classroom areas with one class that can use the computers. I also included access to a TV studio, a teacher workroom that is separate and stocked with teacher resources like curriculum binders, and a game room. Part II Media Center DesignMedia Center Design Reflection Part I Reflection Part III

14 Standard One Sarah Bourgeois' Portfolio USE OF INFORMATION & IDEAS Stimulating Learning Environment Candidates plan and organize library media centers according to their use by the learning community. || Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||Opening Page Table of Contents Standard 1 Standard 2 Standard 3 Standard 4 The floor plan meets with my philosophy because it allows for the library to be an active environment where students and teachers can come for quiet work as well as work in groups. All students have access because the facility is open before and after school as well as at lunch. I would also be available during those times so that I can help answer their questions so that all students can succeed. With my ideal plan and organization of materials in mind, I will better be able to meet the needs of the Part III Media Center DesignMedia Center Design Reflection Part I Reflection Part II

15 Standard Two Teaching and Learning Sarah Bourgeois' Portfolio Related Objectives to Standard 2 Click on the links below to navigate to the different objectives with their related artifacts and reflection statements: Knowledge of Learners and Learning Effective and Knowledgeable Teacher Information Literacy Curriculum || Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||Opening Page Table of Contents Standard 1 Standard 2 Standard 3 Standard 4

16 Standard Two Sarah Bourgeois' Portfolio Action Plan Reflection Part II Reflection Part III TEACHING AND LEARNING Knowledge of Learners and Learning Candidates support the learning of all students and other members of the learning community, including those with diverse learning styles, abilities and needs. || Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||Opening Page Table of Contents Standard 1 Standard 2 Standard 3 Standard 4 Part I “The cure for boredom is curiosity. There is no cure for curiosity.” – Dorothy Parker Although both boys and girls frequent the Walter Johnson library, boys are less likely to check out books or become part of the Book Club. Since this is not a phenomenon limited to my school, other librarians have taken the initiative to better support the needs and abilities of boys. "In our library we have found that while the graphic novels collection comprises only 1% of the collection, it accounts for more than 25-30% of circulation" (McPherson quoted in Heckman, 2004). Research shows that students are already engaged in reading graphic novels even though our resources are low. My Graphic Novel Action Plan is an artifact that shows my commitment to helping students of all learning styles to learn and enjoy reading. Statistics show that just over half of boys declare themselves non-readers by the time they hit high school. What I learned from this project is that part of this is due to the fact that typical boy books aren’t the focus of many libraries. For example, boys tend to like the non-fiction books, however funds do not always get allocated to keep them up to date or titles that are boy-centered. I also learned that brain-based research shows that boys have stronger right brain tendencies. The right brain is visual-spatial whereas the left brain supports linguistic abilities. When looking at the strengths of boys, it tends to fall on the visual-spatial side. This would explain in part why boys flock towards graphic novels. In addition, when looking at communication differences between men and women, women use many more words and communicate their emotions, whereas boys use fewer words where most of them are verbs. This again can support the interest boys have in using graphic novels.

17 Standard Two Sarah Bourgeois' Portfolio Action Plan Reflection Part I Reflection Part III TEACHING AND LEARNING Knowledge of Learners and Learning Candidates support the learning of all students and other members of the learning community, including those with diverse learning styles, abilities and needs. || Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||Opening Page Table of Contents Standard 1 Standard 2 Standard 3 Standard 4 Part II Howard Gardner’s Theory of Multiple Intelligences states that there are eight intelligences but that our school system currently taps into only two: linguistic and math/reasoning. He would support that graphic novels assist kids who have strengths in spatial and interpersonal skills as well. Graphic novels are great support the learning of all students, including nontraditional learners, as well as a good way to challenge more gifted students. Media criticism leads individuals to think critically about the information they are presented. Graphic novels assist students that have cognitive disabilities in the areas of decoding, visualization, and text comprehension. They allow for students who have difficulty creating images as they read to see images already created. This can help them decode words. This will help ESL students who will spend much focus on pronunciation and will therefore miss many of the meanings. In addition, there are idioms used in the United States that are infused in some graphic novels. This will help students from other countries pick up on those meanings. Graphic novels have a place in the school media center: and it is front and center. In order to make this happen, I would follow my action plan to enable more funds to be gained. What I hadn’t originally thought about is that graphic novels also have a place for teachers: in their classroom. Whether used to increase reading for fun or as a support for the curriculum, graphic novels area possibility for all students. Graphic novels create information literate students and independent learners. It is necessary that our students are able to see themselves in literature. If such books are taken off of the shelves what message are we sending our students? Reference McPherson, K. (2006). Graphic literacy. Teacher Librarian, 33(4), ,66. Retrieved October 18, 2009, from Platinum Periodicals.

18 Standard Two Sarah Bourgeois' Portfolio Collaborative Planning GuideCollaborative Planning Guide Reflection Part II Reflection Part III TEACHING AND LEARNING Effective and Knowledgeable Teacher Candidates work with classroom teachers to co-plan, co-teach, and co-assess information skills instruction. || Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||Opening Page Table of Contents Standard 1 Standard 2 Standard 3 Standard 4 Part I “Being in a band is always a compromise. Provided that the balance is good, what you lose in compromise, you gain by collaboration.” -Mike Rutherford The experience of a full collaborative effort on an American Revolution/ Historical Fiction unit was similar to being in a band. Each teacher had their own ideas on how to best convey material to students. The co-planning, co-teaching, and co-assessing allowed us to create an enriching final product. During part of the co-planning, the teachers and I decided that it would be important to survey students’ knowledge of information literacy skills from last year. I was able to use this data to adapt future instructional activities within the American Revolution topic so that all students could find success. On the items where there was little confusion, like non-fiction vs. fiction, I was able to spend less time reviewing whereas genres I was able to use that word to discuss historical fiction. This reflects attention to achievement needs of all students in lesson plans and instruction. The artifacts include many of the components of the American Revolution collaborative lesson. First, we had to co-plan a lesson which included the standards and desired outcomes for skills and content. We outlined a time frame and divvied up the responsibilities. I typed up directions so that the teachers could follow along with what I was going to tell the students. This way, when we broke into groups each teacher knew what to do. There were four groups two led by media specialists and two by teachers. Each group followed a lesson that included teaching about gathering information, learning about historical fiction and writing their own piece of historical fiction.

19 Standard Two Sarah Bourgeois' Portfolio Collaborative Planning GuideCollaborative Planning Guide Reflection Part I Reflection Part III TEACHING AND LEARNING Effective and Knowledgeable Teacher Candidates work with classroom teachers to co-plan, co-teach, and co-assess information skills instruction. || Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||Opening Page Table of Contents Standard 1 Standard 2 Standard 3 Standard 4 With a teacher new to having a fifth grade, social studies focus I used the curriculum guide from unit 1 of 5th grade and with inner knowledge of ultimately what kids have to know by 10th grade to decide what the top six things kids should know about the American Revolution. Much of my own learning happened in the planning stage. Since I am a high school social studies teacher, I had great plans for how to teach this lesson. The hardest part was realizing that I was not their content teacher. My instinct is to jump right in. What I learned is that it is ultimately the other teacher’s classroom and that I can run ideas by them, but many decisions are ultimately theirs to make. I made suggestions on timing, what ideas are most important, interactive components of the lesson, as well as the content and skills to be covered in the media center as well as in the classroom. Luckily, they were appreciative that I had a big picture perspective since I have written curriculum and teach government. The co-teaching occurred with dividing up the skill lessons of gathering information and knowledge of historical fiction while the teachers focused on the content on the American Revolution back in the classroom. I enabled students to identify their own information needs by allowing them to navigate Encyclopedia Britannica to find the best article and then pull information from that article. Students on day three were also able to select and evaluate materials relevant to their personal stories by looking through many fiction and non-fiction American Revolution titles. The teachers decided to assess the final product of the book while I assessed the smaller steps that led them to this final product. Each day I graded an exit card for the 5th graders, providing prompt and specific feedback to learners. This enabled the teachers to know how far they have come in the learning process so they could better continue the lesson in the classroom. Part II

20 Collaborative Planning GuideCollaborative Planning Guide Reflection Part I Reflection Part II TEACHING AND LEARNING Effective and Knowledgeable Teacher Candidates work with classroom teachers to co-plan, co-teach, and co-assess information skills instruction. || Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||Opening Page Table of Contents Standard 1 Standard 2 Standard 3 Standard 4 Part III I found that through co-planning, co-teaching, and co-assessing, students were more engaged and came up with better products. Students left with broader content knowledge and skills then they would have had either librarian or teacher worked independently. The format used in the artifact is one that I will follow in future collaborative efforts. Sarah Bourgeois' Portfolio Standard Two

21 Sarah Bourgeois' Portfolio Psychology HandoutPsychology Handout Reflection Part II TEACHING AND LEARNING Information Literacy Curriculum Candidates employ strategies to integrate the information literacy curriculum with the content curriculum. || Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||Opening Page Table of Contents Standard 1 Standard 2 Standard 3 Standard 4 What do an article on a horse that can count and an article on why women cheat have in common? They both require the reader to think critically. Students in three AP psychology classes were given an information literacy lesson on how to evaluate sources so that they could prepare for an assessment on the Altered States of Consciousness content. The course required that students complete a short literature review on a topic of their choice. The end goal was to have students use one scholarly journal article which came from Proquest and another article from a credible resource. In order to find success on the content of sleep, dreams, hypnosis and drugs students would need good information literacy skills to find relevant articles. The first step was teaching students how to evaluate the credibility of a source. To activate prior knowledge, I used the promethean board to show real articles from different sites to have the students determine whether or not they thought the sites were credible. Sites that were used included Proquest, a blog from Science Daily, and By using the Promethean pen tool, students circled information including date, author, whether it was a primary versus secondary document, advertisements, if the website would cite the article for the reader, and a discussion on the purpose of the site. Once the class had come to a conclusion on credibility, they were split into smaller groups to read an article. In these groups they had to decide on a spectrum of credible to not credible where the article would fall. One student per group stood along the spectrum and discussed reasons for the placement. It was obvious from this informal assessment that students truly understood how to find a credible source. To integrate information literacy into the content of the States of Consciousness Part I

22 Standard Two Sarah Bourgeois' Portfolio Psychology HandoutPsychology Handout Reflection Part I TEACHING AND LEARNING Information Literacy Curriculum Candidates employ strategies to integrate the information literacy curriculum with the content curriculum. || Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||Opening Page Table of Contents Standard 1 Standard 2 Standard 3 Standard 4 unit, students were shown how to use Proquest for content-related topics. One student modeled their project on the projector. The student was asked to type in the consciousness topic they chose. We walked through the importance and meaning on both scholarly and peer-reviewed articles. All other students worked alongside the model student to find articles on their own topics. Students learned some of the nuances of Proquest, as well as APA citation capabilities. From this experience, I have learned how much students learned when asked about whether or not something was credible. Since I often find students using non-credible sites for information, I had originally concluded that maybe they didn’t know what a credible source was. From this experience, I can now say that they do understand and have the tools to better evaluate sites. This still piques my interest in knowing why students use less credible sources; time, effort searching, etc.? I will find the answer to this question the next time I teach this lesson by having students fill out a pre- assessment on what they think makes a credible source and ask them why people use less credible sources anyway. This lesson really helped students on two information literacy skills including information seeking strategies and selecting and evaluating resources. The information literacy lesson truly helped students to acquire better, more relevant and timely articles in less class time because there were fewer questions on whether or not they could use a particular resource. Although the critical think lesson took one full class period, the content teacher will save time in the long-run because she won’t have to stop throughout the year to discuss. In addition, students will have higher performance because of meeting the project rubric of having a scholarly journal article. Part II

23 Standard Three Collaboration and Leadership Sarah Bourgeois' Portfolio Related Objectives to Standard 3 Click on the links below to navigate to the different objectives with their related artifacts and reflection statements: Connection with the Library Community Instructional Partner Educational Leader || Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||Opening Page Table of Contents Standard 1 Standard 2 Standard 3 Standard 4

24 Standard Three Sarah Bourgeois' Portfolio Pamphlet Reflection Part II COLLABORATION AND LEADERSHIP Connection with the Library Community Candidates employ strategies to ensure connections between the school community and the larger library world of public, academic, special libraries, and information centers. || Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||Opening Page Table of Contents Standard 1 Standard 2 Standard 3 Standard 4 Just imagine if everyone in the state of Maryland was reading the same book. Think of the wonderful discussion that could come from this opportunity. The One Maryland One Book Program began in the 2008 and included 6,000 participants, made up of both adults and school-children. The program requires involvement between our school and the larger library community. This larger community involves schools and communities all across Maryland. It also includes the public libraries where our community members will hear about the program and check out the book. Students will also be referred to local information centers. My involvement began this summer when I created a flier for the 2009 book, Song Yet Sung. When first given the task of creating a pamphlet for Seneca Valley High School on the One Maryland One Book, I first did some research. I checked out the fictional book at the local library and did some searching the Internet for its historical background. As I read through multiple articles, I realized this book would be a great way for the school to work with the larger library world of public libraries and information centers. I was able to collaborate with Nicole Little-Cook, the Media Specialist, and English teachers at Seneca Valley to create and edit a brochure that was informative, eye-catching and accessible to the students. The brochure needed to include information about the One Maryland One Book Program as well as the requirements that would be set forth from Seneca Valley. The brochure conveyed to students that they would need to write a short paper about the book as well as bring in some discussion questions. There would be a special Book Club held in the fall to discuss this book. In order to take full advantage of the discussion that could come from the book, students, parents and teachers were invited to attend. Once the pamphlet was created, I copied and printed enough for all students to be given a flier in their English classes as well as kept some on display at Seneca Valley’s Media Center. Part I

25 Standard Three Sarah Bourgeois' Portfolio COLLABORATION AND LEADERSHIP Connection with the Library Community Candidates employ strategies to ensure connections between the school community and the larger library world of public, academic, special libraries, and information centers. || Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||Opening Page Table of Contents Standard 1 Standard 2 Standard 3 Standard 4 Not only was it important to get the students involved, but we also wanted the community to attend the event. One of the strategies I used to ensure connections between the school community and the larger library world was to use and phone communications to collaborate with Lisa, a librarian at the Germantown Public Library. Lisa and I had in-depth conversations about “advertising” the book. She set up a station devoted to Seneca Valley High School that displayed Song Yet Sung as well as Black Eyed Susan books. She also posted our brochures for both programs. From this experience, I learned much about the information centers in our area. My knowledge about Maryland’s role during the slave trade has also grown. In order to encourage students to read Song Yet Sung, I completed research on the sites mentioned in the book as well as other relevant sites. I found out that the Underground Railroad goes through Sandy Spring, Maryland. I also learned that there is a tour that students can go on where they walk part of the route. In addition, the cabin referred to in the book Uncle Tom’s Cabin is located in Bethesda, Maryland, although is not yet open to the public. There are also a variety of Black History Museums, including Blacks in Wax and the Reginald F. Lewis Museum in Baltimore, Maryland. Each of these information centers is referred to in the brochure as an optional learning extension. When I went each of these libraries and information centers, I realized the powerful learning opportunities from each. Not only is there one book that teachers, parents and students can read and discuss, but there are many other extensions to learning that can occur to make it an even more powerful experience. Part II Pamphlet Reflection Part I

26 Standard Three Sarah Bourgeois' Portfolio Powerpoint Handout Reflection Part II Reflection Part III COLLABORATION AND LEADERSHIP Instructional Partner Candidates share expertise in the design of appropriate instruction and assessment activities with other professional colleagues. || Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||Opening Page Table of Contents Standard 1 Standard 2 Standard 3 Standard 4 “Inspiring, teaching and learning through technology” is the goal of the Maryland Instructional Computers Coordinators Association (MICCA). One of the best ways to get inspired to try new teaching strategies is by attending conferences. This opportunity allowed me to engage with other professional colleagues in the field and share expertise in the design of appropriate instruction and assessment activities. The future focus of libraries is in 2.0 technologies and assessing students. Not only did I have an opportunity to present at the 2009 MICCA Conference, but I was also able to learn from attending other sessions. I was part of a year-long collaborative effort with the Media Specialist at Walter Johnson, Erica Lodish, and Laura Brown at Wheaton High School to create an online book club using Voicethread. My artifact shows our presentation, which discussed the overall benefits of this technology as well as how we chose to implement it. Using technology within the Book Club gave us a venue to teach student about internet safety, how to make an avatar and how to run an online book chat. Since not everyone at the conference ran a Book Club, I was able to give them examples of how they might use Voicethread in their discipline. For example, I was able to work with one school to brainstorm better ways to communicate with the community. We discussed the possibility of using the video function to tape a math lesson that students could use to see examples being completed. Upon presenting at the 2009 conference, I was able to impart some strategies for how to design an online Book Club. The handout walks the reader through the process of setting up a Voicethread group account. Part I

27 Standard Three Sarah Bourgeois' Portfolio Powerpoint Handout Reflection Part I Reflection Part III COLLABORATION AND LEADERSHIP Instructional Partner Candidates share expertise in the design of appropriate instruction and assessment activities with other professional colleagues. || Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||Opening Page Table of Contents Standard 1 Standard 2 Standard 3 Standard 4 Erica Lodish, Laura Brown and I set up our Book Club to have two groups read and discuss the same book. The benefit of this was to facilitate discussion of students from differing socio-economic groups to potentially gain more variance in perspective. Each school took turns selecting the book to be read. To protect confidentiality, we taught our students how to create and post avatars. Students selected different questions to respond to in an online post. They posted their answers by typing or recording their voice into Voicethread. One unique feature is that students can record their response using their cell phone. The Voicethread experience allowed them to see the responses of students from other schools. In addition, the students can respond to students at other schools, thus enlarging their book club to two schools. Even while presenting, conversations led to ideas that I want to further develop. One such example is using Voicethread to create a dynamic review for tests and quizzes. After sharing my own expertise, I then was able to hear speakers for my own growth. The most interesting speaker I saw was Doug Johnson’s presentation where he discussed the challenges of county policy that prevents using many of the web 2.0 technologies. He gave a comparison using Maxim magazine. He said that you wouldn’t buy the magazine for your library media collection. But, he pointed out that this does not mean that just because there is a non-educational magazine out there that the entire medium (magazines) should be banned from all schools. Instead, teacher librarians should their own professional judgment on what is “appropriate instruction” and show teachers how to utilize technologies that kids already have access to have a purpose in an educational setting. Part II

28 Standard Three Sarah Bourgeois' Portfolio Powerpoint Handout Reflection Part I Reflection Part II COLLABORATION AND LEADERSHIP Instructional Partner Candidates share expertise in the design of appropriate instruction and assessment activities with other professional colleagues. || Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||Opening Page Table of Contents Standard 1 Standard 2 Standard 3 Standard 4 The design and methodology of assessing student learning continues to change as there are more capabilities on the web. Attending conferences has allowed me to grow as a teacher and future librarian by staying appraised of the newest technologies and pedagogy so that I can teach and assess better. The capabilities that Voicethread allowed for would be particularly useful with this year’s concern of student absences due to the flu. This way, teaching and learning can go on due to advances in technology. Part III

29 Standard Three Sarah Bourgeois' Portfolio Toondoo HandoutToondoo Handout Reflection Part II Reflection Part III COLLABORATION AND LEADERSHIP Educational Leader Candidates engage in school improvement activities by partnering with administrators to help teachers learn and practice new ways of teaching. || Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||Opening Page Table of Contents Standard 1 Standard 2 Standard 3 Standard 4 The old adage that “a picture is worth a thousand words” is never truer than when reading political cartoons. Such cartoons are used to promote student interest in political issues. Cartoon analysis is also a skill that students are accountable for on the High School Assessment. The vast amount of technology that is accessible to teachers can be overwhelming to someone who doesn’t view themselves as “tech savvy”. Teaching technology to teachers allowed for school improvement by helping teachers use the newest practices. Since teachers are always looking for engaging ways to teach and assess students on core concepts, I led a session for staff to show them how to use a free online program located at I was able to partner with administration in order to secure a date to present to the social studies department. Pitching the idea to the social studies department was simple because the department chair is always receptive to new ideas and believes in a culture of sharing ideas. Since my time slot followed a department meeting, I didn’t have the entire lunch to talk. This meant that I needed to make my presentation impactful, informative and be able to quickly show them how they can use the information to better their classroom instruction. By the end of the session, I wanted teachers to see how the site can be used as a way to engage learners as well as assessing their understanding of concepts. I was to do this by showing samples that my students had created in one day, on their first use of this website. The second objective was to show teachers how pre- created cartoons could be used as an alternative form of formative assessment. Not only could the student-created cartoon be graded, but a grade could be given based on the students’ ability to decode the cartoons of others. Part I

30 Standard Three Sarah Bourgeois' Portfolio COLLABORATION AND LEADERSHIP Educational Leader Candidates engage in school improvement activities by partnering with administrators to help teachers learn and practice new ways of teaching. || Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||Opening Page Table of Contents Standard 1 Standard 2 Standard 3 Standard 4 This skill is especially important for US History and NSL teachers because students have cartoon interpretation quotations on the High School Assessment. To prepare for the training, I compiled student samples and created and copied a handout. Since I had about minutes to present, I arrived early to log on to the website so that I could show them what my class had already done with the website. I was able to use the Promethean Board to go through the process as a student would. It was easy to convey how intuitive the program was while allowing more inquisitive students to continue to sift through volumes of options. This was a great opportunity to share how to use such features when planning differentiated instruction. From completing the training, I myself learned some valuable lessons. To capture the attention of the staff I had planned for first show some student samples of cartoons created. I figured I would then go through the capabilities of the website as well as how I used it for instruction and assessment. Because of pre-planning, I was logged onto the computer. However, when I went to go to the website, the site took a very long time to launch. I was able to think on my feet and went over the handout and gave some suggested lesson ideas. For the future, not only would I pull up the internet but instead go directly to the site and practice using it on that computer. Part of our school improvement plan is on improving student achievement, particularly of students who are currently ineligible. My students, ranging from inclusion government to advanced placement psychology have already found great success in using this program. Part II Toondoo HandoutToondoo Handout Reflection Part I Reflection Part III

31 Standard Three Sarah Bourgeois' Portfolio COLLABORATION AND LEADERSHIP Educational Leader Candidates engage in school improvement activities by partnering with administrators to help teachers learn and practice new ways of teaching. || Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||Opening Page Table of Contents Standard 1 Standard 2 Standard 3 Standard 4 By holding this staff development session, I am able to show teachers a program that encourages low-level learners and disengaged students to think critically about course material and makes them want to take ownership over a good product. Part III Toondoo HandoutToondoo Handout Reflection Part I Reflection Part II

32 Standard Four Program Administration Sarah Bourgeois' Portfolio Standard 4 Related Objectives to Standard 4 Click on the links below to navigate to the different objectives with their related artifacts and reflection statements: Managing Information Resources: Selecting, Organizing, Using Managing Program Resources: Human, Financial, Physical Comprehensive and Collaborative Strategic Planning and Assessment || Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||Opening Page Table of Contents Standard 1 Standard 2 Standard 3 Standard 4 Handbook

33 Standard Four Sarah Bourgeois' Portfolio Collection AnalysisCollection Analysis DAE Record Requisition Reflection Part II PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION Managing Information Resources: Selecting, Organizing, and Using Candidates select, analyze, and evaluate print, non-print and electronic resources using professional selection tools and evaluation criteria to develop a quality collection designed to meet diverse curricular and personal needs.. || Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||Opening Page Table of Contents Standard 1 Standard 2 Standard 3 Standard 4 He who rejects change is the architect of decay. ~Harold Wilson During my internship at Seneca Valley High School, the librarian discussed a need for updating certain areas of the collection. I developed a procedure to select, analyze, and evaluate print, non-print, and electronic resources. In order to develop a quality collection designed to meet diverse curricular needs of students I used the professional selection tools and evaluation criteria that were given to me. My artifact shows the selections I made for students completing projects in English as well as for free choice reading in the area of sports. The first step of selecting books I took was actually going to the shelves to see what the sections already contained. I realized that there was a need for balance in the weeding and restocking of books. The librarian at Seneca Valley had just finished a large process of weeding videos from the shelves. She gave me the great advice to weed a book in the section you were buying and weed out two books from any section whenever you shelve a new book. After gaining comfortability with the collection and doing some weeding, I moved onto the second step which was to evaluate new resources. I paid particular attention to making sure these items were current and appropriate to our students and that they aligned with MCPS curriculum. To make sure the books connected with the curriculum, I had to find out what the librarian and teachers were going to teach. Reading professional reviews of the newest books helped to get the most out of limited funds. Some professional selection sources that I have found most useful are School Library Journal, Booklist Online and Booklist. Part I

34 Standard Four Sarah Bourgeois' Portfolio PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION Managing Information Resources: Selecting, Organizing, and Using Candidates select, analyze, and evaluate print, non-print and electronic resources using professional selection tools and evaluation criteria to develop a quality collection designed to meet diverse curricular and personal needs. || Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||Opening Page Table of Contents Standard 1 Standard 2 Standard 3 Standard 4 The book jobbers also tend to have suggestions, especially if they can analyze the current collection. I was able to use Titlewave to help me find books that not only had one positive review, but oftentimes two or three. Evaluation tools were used on the new resources as well as to analyze the collection as a whole. In looking at the collection as a whole, Seneca Valley had updated the fiction section greatly over the past few years. The non-fiction sections with books on health and psychology were also more up to date because they were sections that were in use for student projects. Sections that needed updating included religion, sports, and certain titles that pertained to a new English project that a teacher started in the past school year. This English project also required the use of online databases. Using the second artifact of evaluation criteria for online sources, I was able to suggest the use of Proquest: Learning Literature, Student Resource Center and Literature Resource Center. From this experience, I learned about myself as a weeder and keeper of books. Weeding can be difficult when the title is one I love or feel is a classic, but then I realized that it does not serve a school collection well if it just sits. I also realized that you don’t have to always get rid of a book because it hasn’t been well-circulated. Instead, the media specialist can promote the reading of it by changing its location, display or use a book talk. This experience also taught me the whole process of including selecting, analyzing, and evaluating resources from beginning to end. I learned how to use Database of Accountable Evaluations (DAE), how to look up the collections of other schools, how to use Titlewave and Instructional Management System (IMS). Part II Collection AnalysisCollection Analysis DAE Record Requisition Reflection Part II

35 Standard Four Sarah Bourgeois' Portfolio PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION Managing Program Resources: Human, Financial, Physical Candidates develop and evaluate policies and procedures that support the mission of the school and address specific needs of the library media program challenged materials and acceptable use policies. || Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||Opening Page Table of Contents Standard 1 Standard 2 Standard 3 Standard 4 “To me success means effectiveness in the world, that I am able to carry my ideas and values into the world -- that I am able to change it in positive ways.”- Maxine Hong Kingston The creation of a Media Center Handbook is beneficial so that all who work in the Media Center have one location in which to look up the policies and procedures to operate by. It is also beneficial if you have a substitute or student teacher so that they can teach themselves some of the procedures. The policies on Internet Acceptable Use and how to handle challenged materials help anyone in the Media Center to understand that there are formal processes for dealing with such issues. In support of the school’s mission to establish relationships, the handbook also gives suggested procedures so that teachers and library media specialists can best collaborate. As I began the task of compiling the handbook, I had to decide what should be included. I first included the Media Center’s mission and vision, a document that directly supports the school’s mission. The mission of the media program is to enable students and staff to effectively evaluate and use ideas and information to increase student curiosity and achievement beyond the school walls. Part of the vision of the Media Center is to provide equitable access to resources so that all students can become skilful producers and consumers of information. The Media Center will support the School Improvement Plan by having selection policies that encourage differentiated and culturally relevant material to students and teachers to use. The Media Center Handbook is aligned with the School Improvement Plan through its policies regarding collection development, hours of operation and check out. These policies allow students equitable access to resources. Part I Handbook of Policies and ProceduresHandbook of Policies and Procedures Reflection Part II

36 Standard Four Sarah Bourgeois' Portfolio Handbook of Policies and ProceduresHandbook of Policies and Procedures Reflection Part I PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION Managing Program Resources: Human, Financial, Physical Candidates develop and evaluate policies and procedures that support the mission of the school and address specific needs of the library media program challenged materials and acceptable use policies. || Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||Opening Page Table of Contents Standard 1 Standard 2 Standard 3 Standard 4 The information on collection development highlights when to weed each section for long term maintenance. This way, students have equitable access to current resources particularly for subjects that outdate quickly. The hours of operation allow for students to work before and after school, as well as at lunch. The number of books that can be checked out, as well as the loan period can vary due to the need of the students. In line with the School Improvement Plan, students are encouraged to borrow all materials. When it comes time to put my Media Center Handbook into practice, I will go back and add the web link locations for the MCPS policies. In this way the handbook can more easily change with the times. It will not become out of date as fast because you can access the links every year to find updates to policies and procedures. I would also keep a copy saved to the staff folder so that it can be accessed electronically. To further evaluate the policies and procedures that have been set forth in the handbook, I would ask my Library Advisory Committee at the school to review it. This would allow me to hear the student view on whether or not the policies are truly supporting the school climate of equity and inclusion. They would also be able to give me feedback on items that should be added or deleted. I would also survey teachers, administrators and media assistants whom use the library the most to see what information might be useful for them to have included. Part II

37 Standard Four Sarah Bourgeois' Portfolio || Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||Opening Page Table of Contents Standard 1 Standard 2 Standard 3 Standard 4 "The essence of mathematics is not to make simple things complicated, but to make complicated things simple." -- S. Gudder During my internship at Gaithersburg Elementary School, I found out that part of their mission is to provide an open, welcoming environment where students and staff find access to materials and information for personal use and in support of the curriculum. Through use of the Media Center, they hope students will become independent information seekers and develop and support a habit of reading for pleasure. Quantitative and qualitative methods of data collection and analysis were used in order to see how much fifth grade students had retained about how to access and use resources available. Quantitative data was gathered in a survey that allowed me to numerically calculate the level of student comfort with certain resources. All thirty- one fifth-grade students from two different summer school classes participated. All students were Gaithersburg Elementary School students. The responses showed that students felt most comfortable with the Patron’s Catalog and less comfortable with SIRS Discover. This was expected because SIRS Discover had not yet been taught in Gaithersburg’s library. When asked to list four genres, most students were able to list two. When students were asked to find information on the American Revolution, 29 out of 31 knew to use a non-fiction source. The data showed that slightly more than 50% of students knew when to use certain applications, as shown in that only 14 knew when to use Word, 10 knew when to use PowerPoint, and 15 knew when to use Publisher. Students were also given an opportunity to give open-ended feedback about things they liked about the library as well as things they’d like to change. PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION Comprehensive and Collaborative Strategic Planning and Assessment Candidates use quantitative and qualitative methods of data collection and analysis to assess data and make decisions on which to base plans and policies. Part I 5 th Grade Survey with Analysis5 th Grade Survey with Analysis Reflection Part II

38 Standard Four Sarah Bourgeois' Portfolio || Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||Opening Page Table of Contents Standard 1 Standard 2 Standard 3 Standard 4 PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION Comprehensive and Collaborative Strategic Planning and Assessment Candidates use quantitative and qualitative methods of data collection and analysis to assess data and make decisions on which to base plans and policies. Many students liked the variety of books provided as well as how the library was laid out. Students suggested the library purchase books on the following topics: gaming, plays, Captain Underpants, and 3D books. Qualitative observations were also used to assess student knowledge and use. From these observations I knew that many students use the Patron’s catalog but have difficulty when they don’t know additional words related to their topic nor have difficulty spelling key search terms. One plan for the future is to tape the spelling of popular search words with pictures of those words to the Patron’s Catalog. I also observed students spending a lot of time by the series books and that this area was partially blocked by spinners. As a result of this observation, the spinners have been moved a bit further out so as to allow for more free movement. By using quantitative and qualitative research we were able to create goals for this school year. The media specialist will work with students on the names of genres and what the word genre means. One student’s suggestion that we need “more patron’s catalogs because a lot of people want to find books,” resulted in the addition of one more patron’s catalog to facilitate more students having access to finding resources quickly. The media specialist will also clarify how to use programs like Word, PowerPoint and Publisher by using them on class projects. One policy that may change due to the survey was dealing with the number of books being checked out. Students surveyed said they’d like to change the numbers of checked out books from one to two at a time for students in kindergarten through second grade. Part II 5 th Grade Survey with Analysis5 th Grade Survey with Analysis Reflection Part I Reflection Part III

39 Standard Four Sarah Bourgeois' Portfolio || Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||Opening Page Table of Contents Standard 1 Standard 2 Standard 3 Standard 4 PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION Comprehensive and Collaborative Strategic Planning and Assessment Candidates use quantitative and qualitative methods of data collection and analysis to assess data and make decisions on which to base plans and policies. One thing I learned from this experience is how to make a survey for such a young audience. If I could do the survey again, I would explain what I was looking for in the Black Eyed Susan question so that answers would be uniform and more easily quantifiable. I had thought to model how to complete the matching section without showing my answer (so the students wouldn’t just copy what I wrote), but there were still two students confused. Even though the survey had a few flaws, it was a great method of data collection. It allowed me to assess what students already know and allowed me to make plans for the future. Part II 5 th Grade Survey with Analysis5 th Grade Survey with Analysis Reflection Part I Reflection Part II


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