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May 15, 2008 Project Graduation: The Digital Advantage.

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Presentation on theme: "May 15, 2008 Project Graduation: The Digital Advantage."— Presentation transcript:

1 May 15, 2008 Project Graduation: The Digital Advantage

2 Arizona has the highest high school dropout rate in the U.S. and graduation rates declined in 2006 Only 42% of graduates go on to college Arizona per-pupil spending rate went from 49th to 50th Less than 20% of Pima County residents have a bachelor’s degree Johns Hopkins University study lists Desert View and Sunnyside as among “Arizona’s Dropout Factories” Cities in Crisis A Special Report on High School Graduation April 1, 2008 Silent Epidemic Sense of Urgency

3 “Only about one-half (52%) of students in the principal school systems of the 50 largest cities complete high school with a diploma”. Furthermore, great disparities exist between high school settings and sub- groups within those settings. Schools in urban areas (60.4%) are far more likely to have lower graduation rates than suburban areas (74.9%) Cities in Crisis

4 69% of the students stated that they were not motivated to work harder in class, but 66% would have worked harder if the school’s expectations were higher % of students who dropped out of school had frequent absences the year prior to their departure, and 38% of students felt they had too much freedom allowing for more frequent absences. In fact, 43% of the students cited an accumulation of absences that prohibited them from “catching up” as one of the primary reasons for leaving school. The Silent Epidemic Perspectives of High School Dropouts A report by Civic Enterprises in association with Peter D. Hart Research Associates for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation John M. Bridgeland, John J. DiIulio, Jr., & Karen Burke Morison, March 2006

5 Nationally, nearly one in five high schools has weak promoting power (<60%). Arizona is one of 15 states that collectively house almost 80% of the country’s high schools producing the highest number of dropouts. Tucson, as one of the nation’s largest 100 cities, has 50% or more of its high schools showing less than 60% promoting power. Sunnyside High School and Desert View High School made the nation’s “dropout factory” list in a follow-up brief given to the Associated Press from John Hopkins University in Based upon data for the graduating classes of , 35 high schools in Arizona—one in five—made this list of schools that qualified by having weak promoting power (<60%). Identifying the Dropout Crisis

6 SUSD Reality Check Freshman failure rates in algebra 2006 Algebra I grades are an important predictor of whether students drop out or graduate; students who failed this course were 4.1 times more likely to drop out than those who passed the course. Freshman promotion/retention rates Nearly 33% of freshmen were not reaching sophomore status on time. Senior class academic profile While over 1,034 students began as freshman, only 556 were on track to graduate in four years.

7 Limited credit recovery No Strategic Plan to monitor, assist and support Limited computer and correspondence opportunities Funding/Transportation problem Excessive failure rates Middle school transition and readiness 9 th grade experience Lack of academic progress for 2008 senior cohort Current Credit Recovery Options SUSD Obstacles

8 Longitudinal District AYP Graduation Results

9 Academic Progress of 2008 Cohort

10 SUSD CHALLENGE

11 Freshman Year Students who fail/repeat 9 th grade tend to:Students who fail/repeat 9 th grade tend to: –fail algebra –have poor reading comprehension and fluency –lack intermediate academic skills Compared to other grade levels, 9 th -grade dropouts are more likely to:Compared to other grade levels, 9 th -grade dropouts are more likely to: –leave school for disciplinary reasons –leave due to a lack of inspiration or motivation –have more frequent absences during the year in which they leave See research report for citations on these facts.

12 Freshman Promotion Rates

13 A Call to Action Project Graduation Phase I: Increasing High School Graduation Rates in SUSD: A Strategic Plan Phase II: Credit Recovery Phase III: Freshman Intervention Phase IV: District Attendance Initiative Phase V: Advisory Periods for Phase VI: Summer School

14 Project Graduation: Phase I SUSD Graduation Strategic Plan Components Graduation Data Points Do the math Data alignment - Infinite Campus Data analysis Graduation intervention plan for School Year: 2008 Targeted interventions for seniors who can graduate in 2008 Credit recovery options Targeted for graduation in ‘08 with space available for others in need Districtwide graduation support team Counselor School administrator Central office personnel Intervention plan anticipated expenses Board action Graduation Intervention Plan Budget

15 Phase II: Credit Recovery Interventions Sample Model

16 Phase III: Freshman Intervention Study Skills Class Implemented a study skills class in January to serve 125 of the at-risk freshmen at each site Reading/Literacy Class Implemented a reading class for 100 freshmen who were significantly below grade level in their reading abilities Freshman Attendance Intervention Team Each school site will examine current personnel and their responsibilities regarding attendance intervention in an effort to identify resources/personnel to more closely monitor student attendance

17 We want every student and family to know that attendance is the first step to success in school. A strong emphasis on attendance is fundamental to achieving our mission of academic success and our goal of graduation for every student. SUSD has initiated one of the most comprehensive attendance initiatives the district has ever experienced. The SUSD Attendance Initiative Components: Phase IV: District Attendance Initiative Alignment and clarification of the attendance policy. A districtwide policy will be enforced consistently at SUSD schools. Operational efficiency, to ensure that all teachers follow the same procedure, to decrease attendance-taking errors, and to improve our overall efficiency. Incentives and recognitions at each school K-12 to acknowledge and give positive reinforcement to those students who improve their attendance. Each school now has a budget for incentives. An intervention plan to address unexcused absences in a timely manner and in a more personalized way. Awareness of the importance of attendance, with improved student/parent communication systems and the development of a new culture of attendance The Ninth-Grade Attendance Intervention Plan includes timely interventions and consequences, attendance monitoring, the Mentors Project, MessageYou, and active involvement of the Governing Board and superintendent.

18 Freshman Attendance Intervention Plan Freshman Focus Mandatory Parent Meeting: At 10 unexcused absences in one class, a mandatory parent meeting will be held with the superintendent or assistant superintendent or Governing Board member to discuss the reason for absences. Assistant principal: Assistant principals will assign detention, single-period ISS, half-day ISS, or all-day ISS as appropriate. They may assign Saturday credit recovery to help improve grades. Students will meet with an assistant principal and parent contact will be made. Six house teachers for every assistant principal. Level II Monitoring: Freshman Mentors (Central office members partnered with a home base teacher). A team of school and district personnel will partner with the home base teachers to monitor student attendance of a designated group of students. Monitoring will consist of communicating with the teacher to assist in making phone calls to parents, meeting individually with students who have absences, and making referrals to outreach team, counselor, or assistant principal for needed intervention. Outreach Team: (Includes the truancy officer, PIA, ACO, and Prevention Office). Outreach team will make home visits to hard-to-reach students/parents and to students who have three or more consecutive unexcused absences. Level I Monitoring: Freshman Teachers (18 freshman house teachers and ELL/SPED teachers). Teachers will decide within their house to take responsibility for a class of students in a designated period. They will monitor each student’s attendance for the entire school day, making phone calls home on unexcused absences and referring students as needed to the counselor, outreach team, or assistant principal assigned to their classes as needed.

19 Phase V: Advisories It is in the one-on-one relationship with their advisors, however, that students primarily experience advisory as a social, emotional, and academic support system. This component of advisory provides students with someone to go to when they need help either with their work or with negotiating their relationships with peers and teachers. advisory helps students make sense of and navigate their school experience advisory provides students with a sense of belonging

20 SUSD Advisory Guiding Principles Meet at least twice a week Minimum 30 minutes meeting time Allow for teachers to loop with their students from year to year (6- 8) (9-10,11-12) Utilize a research-based advisory curriculum Include relationship component Measurable accountability One adult that will serve as an advocate for students Dr. Manuel Isquierdo

21 Building on last year’s success Parent Engagement Initiative Learning Community Initiative College Readiness

22 Parent Engagement Parents As Teachers Research-based educational support for parents of children 0-5 years old Family Literacy English-language, GED, and school volunteering College Academy for Parents College preparation workshops for parents of elementary students Project College Bound College-prep workshops for high school students and parents Parent involvement assistants (PIAs) at every school Liaison between parents and schools Parent Engagement Steering Committee District Parent Council Meetings with parents, PIAs and pricipals

23 Learning Community Leaders Learning Community Partnerships Foundation Alumni Association University of Arizona Pima Community College Businesses Neighborhood associations $100,000 USA Funds scholarship award in recognition of Initiative’s success Alumni Association Dollars for Scholars- $182,000 to 173 students in three years Sunnyside Community Stories Project Learning Community Initiative

24 College Readiness AVID – Advancement via Individual Determination Arizona Academic Scholars Arizona H.S. College Relations Councils Honors Diploma Advanced Placement ScholarShop ScholarShop Jr. Unlock the Future University of Arizona Partnerships GEAR UP – Gaining Early Academic Readiness and University Preparation College Academy for Parents MESA – Math Engineering Science Achievement Pima Community College Talent Search Upward Bound Project College Bound

25 Many of our Project Graduation Initiatives began between November and December As of 2008, the following slides illustrate our first status report of results yielded. Project Graduation Status Report Freshman Intervention Data Dropout and Unknown Status Academic Progress of 2008 Cohort Attendance Data Graduation Data

26 Cohort 2011 – Single Period Absences (<4 absences) CURRENT

27 Enrollment Summary—Secondary Enrollment, Withdrawals & Unknowns High Schools Enrollment (Begin 1st Sem) 8/7/07 Enrollment (1st Qtr) 10/11/07 Enrollment (1st Sem) 12/20/07 Enrollment (Begin 2nd Sem) 01/10/08 Enrollment (3rd Qtr) 3/14/08 Enrollment (Final) 5/20/08 Absence or Unknown (W4) Dropout (W5) Sunnyside (26)13 (9) Desert View (45)25 (22) STAR (29)46 (34) Total Secondary (100)84 (65) Change Middle Apollo (5)0 Challenger (1)0 Chaparral (4)0 Lauffer (1)0 Sierra (6)0 Total MS (33)0 Change

28 High Schools—HISTORICAL W5—Dropouts by grade level

29 High Schools—HISTORICAL W4—Unknown withdrawals by grade level

30 SMART Goal for Project Graduation The number of seniors who were academically on track in the fall of 2007 will equal the number of seniors who graduate in May 2008.

31 Enrollment in Credit Recovery Classes Desert View High School English Recovery—17 English Recovery—6 Government—16 Economics—8 Geometry—10 Photography—20 Total: 77 students 6 at STAR Academic Center Sunnyside High School English Recovery—17 English Recovery—9 English Recovery—25 Government—7 Economics—4 Geometry—14 Total: 76 students 2 at STAR Academic Center

32 Academic Progress of Students in their Fourth Year or More

33 This district is ready for change!

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35 Governing Board, Leadership and Staff Our Governing Board is in sync with “Failure is NOT an Option” Leadership of central office and sites is exceptional! Teachers have been exceptionally responsive to the transformation effort and process of change. Louie C. Gonzales, Magdalena Barajas, Robert Jaramillo, President Eva Carrillo Dong, Clerk Eric Giffin

36 Building on this year’s success Project Graduation Blueprint for Student Achievement

37 New & Improved for Blueprint for Student Achievement Strategic Comprehensive Research-based Advisory programs Grades 6-12: for all middle schools & high schools Mentoring programs Ignite mentoring: 200 upperclassmen will be mentors to all incoming freshmen School within a school for both sites – target 60 students New student activities coordinator for each site will be recommended

38 SUSD can make a statement on dropout prevention and improving the graduation rate not only in Arizona but in the nation

39 Sunnyside’s Future “A vision without a plan is just a dream. A plan without a vision is just drudgery. But a vision with a plan can change the world.”

40 SUSD is poised to lead the state and the nation in its focus on graduation and freshman intervention.

41 Building on our success in we launched Project Graduation: The Digital Advantage

42 A Call to Action Project Graduation Year 2 The Digital Advantage

43 Project Graduation: The Digital Advantage A laptop computer… …will be provided for every incoming freshman student who achieves the 4 As by the end of the first semester: Achievement – 2.5 GPA Attitude – positive, good citizenship and no disciplinary issues Attendance – 95% Activities – participation in at least one extracurricular activity

44 Project Graduation: The Digital Advantage Benefits of the Laptop Initiative: We give our incoming freshmen a digital learning advantage. Our business community is investing in the future of students. We convey to our students that we care about them. We accelerate/increase the learning opportunities for: access to technology 21st century skills discovery of a whole new world via the Internet The Digital Advantage will also assist the whole family in learning/accessing 21st century skills. Bridging the digital divide. A new way of thinking, with business partners and SUSD working together

45 Our Commitment to Maximize and Align Technology Resources to The Digital Advantage JTED is providing $460,000 for 100% wireless connectivity at Desert View and Sunnyside. Microsoft software vouchers totaling $600,000 will be committed to The Digital Advantage. To enhance the Digital Advantage experience, one ninth-grade course will be identified to integrate the use of technology into the curriculum. Professional development for the integration of technology into instruction will be delivered to ninth- grade teachers. Information Technologies in cooperation with CTE/JTED will support the technical assistance that will be required for the laptops. The district will work with local lawmakers to expand wireless connectivity in the community.

46 SUSD’s New Support of The Digital Advantage Professional development for teachers to integrate technology into the curriculum Increased extracurricular activity opportunities for incoming freshmen Freshman student activities coordinators Advisory curriculum will be aligned to The Digital Advantage The new grant writer will seek additional funding support for The Digital Advantage Increase attendance monitoring/support staff Example: 2 project managers and 2 attendance clerks

47 An investment in our future Current 8 th grade students At $600 per laptop: 2.0 GPA938 students$562, GPA664 students$398, GPA412 students$247, GPA161 students$96,600

48 An investment in our future Projected number of cohort 2012 students who will meet laptop criteria At $600 per laptop: High800 students$480,000/yr Low600 students$360,000/yr We are committed to four years of the Digital Advantage program, putting laptops in the hands of freshman students in cohorts Projected cost over 4 years is $1.2 million.

49 The Digital Advantage Digital Advantage Scholars 10 th, 11 th & 12 th -grade students A cademics – 3.5 GPA or higher A ttendance – 95%, excused only A ctivity – participation in extracurricular A ttitude – no out-of-school suspensions Digital Advantage 9 th grade students A cademics – 2.5 GPA or higher A ttendance – 95%, excused only A ctivity – participation in extracurricular A ttitude – no out-of-school suspensions NEW

50 Feature in Your Sunnyside Story, mailed to homes July 11. Letter to all incoming ninth-graders on July 18. Postcard on attendance and The Digital Advantage mailed to Sunnyside District Community on July 25. Opening Day Celebration for all SUSD staff on August 6. Press conference held on July 17. Interview on KVOA-TV’s “Inside Arizona Business” with Taunya Villicaña, SUSD Foundation, on June 29. Front page story in the Tucson Citizen on June 30. Editorial in the Tucson Citizen on July 5. Radio interview on Tucson’s JOLT (AM 1330) with Brandon Protas on July 10. Feature on KOLD News 13 on July 17. Feature on KVOA News 4 on July 17. Public Relations & Marketing of The Digital Advantage

51 Articles in the Arizona Daily Star on July 18. Editorials in the Arizona Daily Star and Tucson Citizen on July 21. Interview on Access Cable with Dr. Isquierdo on August 1. Radio interview on La Preciosa (KTZR FM 97.1) with Dr. Jeannie Favela & Brandon Protas on August 3. Live radio interview on KXEW (1600 AM) with Dr. Isquierdo on August 5. Live radio interview on Hot 98.3 FM (KOHT) with Dr. Isquierdo on August second PSA’s on the JohnJay & Rich Show 93.7 KRQ Morning Show beginning August 6. Article in the Arizona Daily Star on August 8. Interview on Univision with Brandon Protas on August 8. Public Relations & Marketing of The Digital Advantage

52 Councilman Steve Leal Wireless in the Sunnyside Community MEC (Metropolitan Education Commission) America’s Promise Alliance Symposium to be hosted in Sunnyside Training for students and counselors for the Regional College Access Center Intel + Professional development for teachers on technology integration University of Arizona, University College University mentors to train students on computer technology 30 hours training for high school teachers on technology integration GEAR UP 10 new clubs at Desert View and Sunnyside high schools Pima Community College 40 hours of training to 50 parents from each high school LULAC (League of United Latin American Citizens) REA Communications In-Kind Contributors to The Digital Advantage

53 FIRST QUARTER REPORT

54 SUSD GOVERNING BOARD Louie C. Gonzales, Magdalena Barajas, Robert Jaramillo, President Eva Carrillo Dong, Clerk Eric Giffin

55 PROJECT GRADUATION: THE DIGITAL ADVANTAGE Presented By Joe Peters, Special Assistant to the Superintendent

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57 The Digital Advantage Digital Scholars 10 th, 11 th & 12 th -grade students: Academics – 3.5 GPA or higher Attendance – 95%, excused only Activity – participation in extracurricular Attitude – no out-of-school suspensions Digital Advantage 9 th grade students: Academics – 2.5 GPA or higher Attendance – 95%, excused only Activity – participation in extracurricular Attitude – no out-of-school suspensions NEW

58 The Digital Advantage: Financial Contributors Anonymous $200,000 PepsiCo and Lane Family $100,000 Sunnyside Foundation $100,000 Tohono O’odham Nation & T.O. Gaming Enterprise $100,000+ Diamond Ventures $40,000 Wal-Mart $25,000+ Pima County Supervisor Ramón Valadez $20,000+ Cox Communications $20,000+ City of Tucson/Mayor Bob Walkup $20,000+ Wells Fargo $20,000 Learning Communities Initiative $20,000 Qwest Communications $20,000 CORE Construction $20,000 Southwest Foodservice Excellence $20,000 TOTAL $725,000+ Legacy= $100,000 Gold= $40,000 Silver= $20,000

59 The Digital Advantage Report Card First 4½ weeks, September 2008 Digital Advantage Incoming 9 th grade students A cademics – 2.5 GPA or higher A ttendance – 95%, excused only A ctivity – participation in extracurricular A ttitude – no out-of-school suspensions DVHSSSHSTOTAL 95% Attendance GPA or Higher Total on Track Digital Advantage Scholars 10 th, 11 th & 12 th -grade students A cademics – 3.5 GPA or higher A ttendance – 95%, excused only A ctivity – participation in extracurricular A ttitude – no out-of-school suspensions DVHSSSHSTOTAL 95% Attendance GPA or Higher Total on Track

60 FRESHMAN SchoolCohortEnrollment95%(7per)2.5 GPAOn Track DVHS SSHS %(14per) DVHS SSHS %(21per) DVHS SSHS DVHS SSHS

61 SOPHOMORES SchoolCohortEnrollment95%(7per)3.5 GPAOn Track DVHS SSHS %(14per) DVHS SSHS %(21per) DVHS SSHS DVHS SHS

62 JUNIORS SchoolCohortEnrollment95%(7per)3.5 GPAOn Track DVHS SSHS %(14per) DVHS SSHS %(21per) DVHS SSHS DVHS SSHS

63 SENIORS SchoolCohortEnrollment95%(7per)3.5 GPAOn Track DVHS SSHS %(14per) DVHS SSHS %(21per) DVHS SSHS DVHS SSHS

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69 Target Group Location Cohort September 2007 Total number of students (2008,2007,2006)- Sept Cohort January 2008 Total number of students (2008,2007,2006)- Jan Cohort September 2008 Total number of students (2009, 2008, 2007)- Sept credits or more in cohort Diplomas cohort Academically on track to graduate District Academically on track to graduate DVHS Academically on track to graduate SSHS – credits Could graduate with credit recovery District Could graduate with credit recovery DVHS Could graduate with credit recovery SSHS – credits Could graduate with credit recovery next year District Could graduate with credit recovery next year DVHS Could graduate with credit recovery next year SSHS Fewer than 6 credits Enrolled with little academic progress District Enrolled with little academic progress DVHS Enrolled with little academic progress SSHS

70 GRADUATION RATES FOR THE DISTRICT- LONGITUDINAL

71 GRADUATION RATES FOR DESERT VIEW HIGH SCHOOL- LONGITUDINAL

72 GRADUATION RATES FOR SUNNYSIDE HIGH SCHOOL- LONGITUDINAL

73 8 th Graders 9 th Graders 10 th Graders

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75 As part of the SUSD Digital Advantage we are excited to announce the Jr. Digital Advantage for Middle School students. SUSD will give an IPOD Shuffle to every student this year who achieves the Four A’s at the end of the first semester: Academics: 3.0 or higher grade point average Attendance: 95% or better attendance rate (as of Sept. 22 nd ) no more than four excused absences, no unexcused, and must attend on the first day of school Activity: regular participation in a school-sponsored extracurricular activity (as of Sept.22 nd ) Attitude: no out-of-school suspension (as of Sept.22 nd )

76 The Digital Advantage An Eye on the Future

77 A chievement – 2.5 grade point average or higher A ttendance – 95% attendance (must be present on first day, no more than four excused absences, no unexcused absences*) A ctivity – P articipation in at least one extracurricular activity that meets on a regular basis with a staff sponsor A ttitude – No out-of-school suspensions * Extreme cases of illness to be reviewed on a case-by-case basis Get the following 4 A’s at the end of the first semester and EARN a laptop computer: The Digital Advantage: Student Expectations

78 The Digital Advantage: Benefits to Build On Digital learning advantage for incoming freshmen Investment in the future of students by businesses and community A sense of caring for and trust in SUSD students An acceleration and increase in learning opportunities: Access to technology 21st century skills Global discovery via the Internet Assistance to families by learning 21st century skills A bridge of the digital divide caused by inequity in access to technological resources A new way of thinking through the collaboration of business and community partners and SUSD

79 The Digital Advantage: New Potential Contributors Helios Foundation National Council of La Raza ASU National LULAC Chicanos Por La Causa Bashas’/Food City Legacy=$100,000 Gold=$40,000 Silver=$20,000

80 The Digital Advantage: Maximizing Technological Resources JTED is providing $460,000 for 100% wireless connectivity at Desert View and Sunnyside. Microsoft software vouchers totaling $600,000 will be committed to The Digital Advantage. To enhance the Digital Advantage experience, one ninth-grade course will be identified to integrate the use of technology into the curriculum. Professional development for the integration of technology into instruction will be delivered to ninth-grade teachers. Information Technologies in cooperation with CTE/JTED will support the technical assistance that will be required for the laptops. The district will work with local lawmakers to expand wireless connectivity in the community.

81 Digital Advantage: The Big Picture I. Curriculum & Instruction II. Post- Secondary Student Preparation III. Classrooms of the Future IV. Professional Development V. Parent Engagement VI. Public Relations & Celebrations VII. Security & Maintenance

82 Role of CTE & JTED: Specialized Student Preparation 30 Programs at DVHS & SHS 3 Portable Laptop Computer Labs Classrooms of the Future in Place

83 II. Post- Secondary Student Preparation 21 st Century Skills: New Ways of Learning Job Preparation Information & Communication College Readiness: Alignment with College Entrance Requirements Preparation for Academic Challenges Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs (GEAR-UP): At SHS & DVHS 6 Clubs per School Work with UA Staff & Students Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID): At All M.S. & H.S. Extra Support for College Readiness E-Mentoring Digital Advantage Scholars Program: Grades % Attendance 3.5 GPA Honor Society End of 3 rd Qtr.

84 Instructional Facilities: Internet Access (in place already) Desktop Computer (in place already) Digital Projector Document Camera (i.e., Elmo) Interactive Whiteboard (i.e., Smart Board) Color Laser Printer E-Instruction Response System

85 Laptop Computers for the Use of 40 “Heatseeker” Teachers! (20 per High School)

86 V. Parent Engagement Awareness of Program: Preliminary Information Expectations Tier II: Additional Voluntary Training Extended Skills Proficiency Digital Bridge: Refurbished Computers For Parents H.S. Students Assist Family Literacy Programs: Computer Training For Parents Sed de Saber: English Language Instruction For Parents Using Computers Tier I: Mandatory 2-Day Orientation Basic Use Maintenance

87 Achievements & Celebrations: Ongoing reports Website Assemblies Event Digital Scholars: Letters Website School TV Posters ParentLink

88 VII. Security & Maintenance Theft or Loss of Computers Security in Use of Computers Upkeep of Computers (i.e., Maintenance) Updates of Computers: Software Updates Trade-ins for New Computers Use of Refurbished Computers Role of Instructional Technology

89 LaptopComputer For Every Teacher Classrooms of the Future in Entire District Laptop Computer Upgrade For Qualified Juniors Free Wireless Connectivity in EntireCommunity "We have seen the future, and the future is ours." ~César Chavez


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