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Establishing Integrated Learning Communities in Housing: A confluence of all areas of the University Jenifer Campbell, Director of Residential Life, Lincoln.

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Presentation on theme: "Establishing Integrated Learning Communities in Housing: A confluence of all areas of the University Jenifer Campbell, Director of Residential Life, Lincoln."— Presentation transcript:

1 Establishing Integrated Learning Communities in Housing: A confluence of all areas of the University Jenifer Campbell, Director of Residential Life, Lincoln Center Amy Harper, Area Coordinator, Rose Hill Greer Jason, PhD, Assistant Dean of Students and Director of Residential Life, Rose Hill Fordham University

2 Introduction: Presenters Jenifer Campbell, MA  Director of Residential Life, Lincoln Center  Supervises Freshman-wide Integrated Learning Community, incorporating residents and commuters  Coordinates development and maintenance of Lincoln Center ILC in consultation with Planning Team Amy Harper, MA  Area Coordinator for Integrated Learning Communities, Rose Hill  Supervises 7 current ILCs and 9 future ILCs at Rose Hill  Coordinates development and maintenance of all Rose Hill ILCs in consultation with ILC Council and Planning Teams Greer Jason, PhD  Assistant Dean of Students and Director of Residential Life, Rose Hill  Involved in development and implementation of 8 of 9 2010-2011 ILCs at Rose Hill  Liaisons with Departments outside of Student Affairs regarding ILCs

3 Introduction: Integrated Learning Communities Integrated Learning Communities vs. Themed Housing  Integrated Learning Communities (ILC) at Fordham University have a particular academic component connected to the community.  Themed Housing caters to specific interests of students and is not connected directly to academic learning. Integrated Learning Communities vs. Residential Colleges  Residential Colleges are communities that emphasize scholarship and have classes in the residence hall, but residents do not have to be enrolled in the courses. An ILC is a portion of a residence hall, while a residential college is an entire building.

4 Introduction: Integrated Learning Communities at Fordham Rose Hill  Building Wide Queen’s Court Residential College The Residential College at Tierney Hall and Manresa Seminar Program NEW: Campbell and Salice-Conley (CSC) Halls  Specific Wing/Floor/Community Freshman SILC: Science Integrated Learning Community Upperclass SILC: Science Integrated Learning Community ILC-GB: Global Business ISLC: Integrated Service Learning Community Wellness Upperclass Housing NEW: West Wing for Leadership and Civic Service  Rose Hill ILCs: Application dependant except for CSC Academic component of some kind except for Wellness Specific shared course requirement (ILC-GB, West Wing, ISLC) Enrollment in one of a series of courses (Tierney) Enrollment in any science course (FR or UC SILC) Optional enrollment in building course (Queen’s Court) Optional participation in Academic Affairs sponsored programming (CSC) Collaboration with multiple departments, including Academic Affairs and Mission and Ministry

5 J J J J Parking Keating Spellman O'Hare Tierney Mulcahy Walsh Freeman Finlay Thebaud Murray- Wiegel Kohl- mann Larkin Duane Dealy Admin. Hughes Loyola J Faber Collins Martyrs’ Court Walsh Library Univ. Church Loschert Hall Alumni Court South Lombardi Gym McGinley Faculty Memorial 1 1 2 2 3 3 4 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5 6 7 8 9 Loschert Hall| Freshman Residence Hall 236 | Double Loaded Corridors | 1 main lounge w/ 3 floor lounges Alumni Court South | Freshman Residence Hall & SILC (FR) 286 | Double Loaded Corridors | 1 main lounge; 4 floor lounges; 1SMART Queen’s Court | Freshman Residential College/ILC 137 | Double Loaded Corridors | 1 main study lounge, 1 classroom Martyrs’ Court | Upperclass (SO/JR) Residence Hall 446 | Double Loaded Corridors | 1 main lounge w/ multiple wing lounges Hughes Hall | Freshman Residence Hall 245 | Quads | 3 floor lounges Finlay Hall | Upperclass (SO/JR) Residence Hall 293 | Mainly Triples & Doubles | 1 main lounge; 1 basement lounge Walsh Hall | Upperclass (JR/SR) Residence Hall 492 | Apartment Style | 1 Basement Lounge Tierney Hall| Freshman Residential College/Manresa ILC 154 | Double Loaded/Some Tripes & Quads| 2 Seminar/Lounges, 2 Seminar O’Hare Hall| Upperclass (SO/JR) Residential College/ SILC/ILC-GB/Wellness/Future home of West Wing 559 | Doubles and Triples | Floor Lounges; Wing Lounges, Seminar Rooms Belmont Community Housing | Upperclass (SO/JR/SR) & ISLC 266 | Off-Campus Houses | Apartments Freshman Halls Upperclass Halls ILC 2009-2010: Current Residence Halls at Rose Hill

6 Rose Hill Integrated Learning Community Structure

7 Introduction: Integrated Learning Communities at Fordham ILC Maintenance ILC Begins Operating ILC Council and Planning Group Charge Supervisory Board Planning Group: Runs Hiring & Student Selection; Finalize Details Planning Group: Proposes Final Design and Staffing to Council Planning Group: Main Planning Process ILC Council: Planning Group Selected and Charged ILC Council: ILC Prioritizing and Selection ILC Council for Rose Hill: Overall Planning and Idea Generation Rose Hill Council Structure:

8 Introduction: Integrated Learning Communities at Fordham Lincoln Center ILC at Lincoln Center: Includes Commuter and Residential First Year Students Academic Component: Centers around 16 Seminar courses and 5 other cohorts that already have a natural connection. Existing Cohorts: Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA), Higher Education Opportunity Program (HEOP), Honors, Natural Science, Theater Fall Seminar Courses: Students submit seminar preference from list of courses offered.  20 students in each seminar with, as much as possible, an even split of residents and commuters.  Residents from each Seminar all live on same floor of McMahon; others who are involved are Commuter Affiliates and Faculty Affiliates. Faculty: The seminar professor is the academic advisor for all students in the seminar, in most cases. Spring Academic Course: The classroom experience of the seminar continues in the spring semester by assigning the same groups of students from the seminars to another core course in the spring semester.

9 Introduction: Integrated Learning Communities at Fordham Lincoln Center Floor Learning Communities:  2nd and 3rd Floors: Ita Ford Learning Community  4th Floor: Dorothy Day Learning Community  5th Floor: John Corridan Learning Community  6th Floor: Oscar Romero Learning Community Commuter Student Access to McMahon: Learning Community Commuter Affiliates can sign themselves into McMahon Hall between 10 am and 6 pm.  Commuters who opt to enter McMahon during the above mentioned hours have to attend a meeting that provides an overview of the rules for visiting the residence hall and participating in the program.  They also sign an acknowledgement form which re-confirms their receipt and acceptance of the policies and tenets of the program.  They agree to read the guest and visitation policies outlined in the Student Handbook.  Additionally, they have an ID decal affixed to their University issued ID for access to McMahon. Appointing Integrated Learning Community Master: A Faculty member, Faculty in Residence (FIR), resides in an on campus apartment and facilitates activities throughout the academic year.

10 ILC Timeline December: Idea Generation January: Mission, Location & Budget December Tasks ILC Council: 1. settle on planning model 2. green light specific ILCs 3. assemble planning groups 4. charge planning groups 5. set initial planning group goals and learning outcomes 6. set initial deadlines 7. monitor lottery calendar to adjust deadlines Planning Group: 1. propose detailed mission and goals 2. set planning group timeline and start Planning Calendar 3. develop draft design 4. develop draft staffing model 5. develop draft student selection process 6. select staff and faculty 7. compose lottery book description 8. begin marketing materials design 9. develop position descriptions for staff and faculty 10. develop facilities renovation/ Improvement proposals 11. propose funding structure 12. develop assessment/ Evaluation structure January Tasks Planning Group: 1. begin marketing to students 2. begin regular planning group meetings 3. set Spring 2009 Planning Calendar 4. finalize mission, goals and position descriptions 5. meet with ILC Council to update and finalize mission, goals, job descriptions 6. launch approved marketing 7. finalize facilities proposals 8. begin selection process 9. propose assessment structure 10. propose/design needs ILC Council: 1. meet with Planning Group 2. approve initial designs 3. approve marketing plan for students 4. approve staffing model and job descriptions 5. provide overall guidance 6. approve facilities proposals 7. discuss/consult on assessment/ evaluation structure 8. approve funding structure February: Participants February Tasks Planning Group: 1. finish student selection process in time for lottery 2. continue design meetings 3. coordinate with facilities/IT on renovations/improvements 4. conduct needs assessments ILC Council: 1. meet with Planning Group for Updates 2. finalize funding structure March March Tasks Planning Group: 1. bring selected residents into planning group process and meetings (if selected) 2. continue design meetings 3. meet with ILC Council to update progress 4. conduct needs assessments 5. begin planning for Supervisory Board formation ILC Council: 1. meet with Planning Group to update progress and provide guidance

11 ILC Timeline April May-July April Tasks ILC Council: 1. charge ILC Supervisory Board Planning Group: 1. form ILC Supervisory Board 2. begin converting to Supervisory Board according to specific ILC Timeframe. Supervisory Board 1. begins work according to specific ILC timeframe. May-July Tasks Planning Group/Supervisory Board: 1. monitoring physical upgrades 2. planning specific programs & traditions (RAs and RDs) 3. develop ILC Activity Calendars 4. potentially communicating with future ILC members/incoming students, parents in coordination with academic units, mission and ministry and residential life. 5. developing newsletters, websites and internal publications 6. conduct pre-Opening needs assessments with residents (for FR ILCs) Integrated Learning Communities 1. staffed and in training ILC Council: 1. provide guidance, oversight and receive updates on progress. August August Tasks Planning Group: 1. planning group becomes Supervisory Board 2. participate in ribbon-cutting/dedication/ opening traditions Supervisory Board 1. oversee final preparations for Opening. 2. full coordination with staff of actual ILCs Integrated Learning Communities 1. final preparations for Opening 2. final planning for ribbon-cutting/dedication/ opening traditions 3. final preparations for assessment and evaluation processes 4. participate in ribbon-cutting/dedication/ opening traditions ILC Council: 1. provide guidance, oversight and receive updates on progress 2. participate in ribbon-cutting/dedication/ opening traditions September-May: Implementation August Tasks Integrated Learning Communities 1. opening and operation of ILCs 2. conduct assessment and evaluation and report to ILC Supervisory Board 3. full coordination with Supervisory Board Supervisory Board 1. oversee ILC on an ongoing basis. 2. report assessment and evaluation data to ILC Council quarterly. ILC Council: 1. provide guidance, oversight and receive updates on progress. 2. meet with Supervisory Boards to review assessment and evaluation data 3. provide quarterly feedback

12 Establishing ILCs: from idea to implementation Idea Generation  Who will be involved? Student Affairs What perspectives could be gained from colleagues in other offices? Academic Affairs How are we incorporating the learning in our ILCs? Mission and Ministry How is this ILC consistent with the mission of the institution? Faculty Who will be teaching or creating the academic component? Students Who are some RAs and student leaders that would provide additional perspective?

13 Establishing ILCs: from idea to implementation Needs Assessments  Find out what the students are saying that they need Feedback from surveys Common themes in conversations Expressed academic needs Example: Interest in continuing their housing experience, we continued the Science Integrated Learning Community (SILC) into the Sophomore year and beyond. SILC II has become one of our most successful ILC initiatives.

14 Establishing ILCs: from idea to implementation Establishing Mission and Learning Outcomes  Mission – determine the direction of the ILC At the end of their time in the ILC, what will be the take-away factor? It should be succinct, specific enough to be intentional but broad enough to be sustainable from year to year.  Learning Outcomes – create the path towards the goal How will the programs and academics implement the mission? They should be measurable and achievable They should be reflective of the staff  How do we determine success?

15 Establishing ILCs: from idea to implementation Identify Location:  What physical space matches the mission of the program? If needed, can the space be modified?  Use a popular space to sell the program or attempt to breathe new life into an underutilized area?  Size  Gender  Staffing

16 Establishing ILCs: from idea to implementation Establish a Budget  Staff Use existing staff or need new staff? Can existing stipends be supplemented? Is creativity possible?  Space Modifications necessary?  Equipment Furniture Technology Supplies Student Give-aways  Event Funding  Publications  Examples from Fordham: Large Budget: Tierney Hall Manresa Program Small Budget: Freshman Science Integrated Learning Community

17 Establishing ILCs: from idea to implementation Determine Staffing:  Create/Modify Job Descriptions  Recruitment and Selection Process Should only returners be considered? Specific to the role or from the general applicant pool?  Additional training necessary?  Develop training materials, position guidelines, and expectations Programming Model When possible, involve newly hired staff

18 Establishing ILCs: from idea to implementation Participants  Recruiting participants  Resident selection process  Back-up plan for student withdrawals  Expectations for participants  Exploring the commuter student role

19 Establishing ILCs: from idea to implementation Policies and Program Parameters: Determine program elements  How will the ILC essence be experienced (Vehicles for Involvement) Establish regular meetings for students, faculty and administrators on an individual and collective basis Form seminar class experiences and lectures in the residence hall environment Create committees to formulate marketing initiatives and campaigns to keep the ‘buzz’ going around the activities in the ILC Engage the interest and expertise of Professors who may not be teaching the seminar class but have a specific interest surrounding topics being taught in the seminar

20 Establishing ILCs: from idea to implementation Policies and Program Parameters: Events  Develop traditional events associated with the ILC The establishment of such programs elicits a sense of pride and ownership  Maintain recurring activities throughout the academic year  Create an events calendar to keep constituents abreast of scheduled activities in advance  Stage a large scale kick-off event at the start of the academic year in addition to ‘special’ and/or ‘celebratory’ times, i.e. a recognition reception for Dorothy Day

21 Establishing ILCs: from idea to implementation Policies and Program Parameters: Training and Defining Staff Expectations  Create an outline of expectations for the role of staff in the ILC, professional and para-professional (if duties vary from other staff personnel in the department, be certain to outline the specifics of their role)  Establish the frequency and expectations for FIR involvement in the ILC Are Faculty expected to attend staff meetings on a regular basis? Are Faculty allotted/apportioned a portion of the budget and allowed to utilize said funds at their own discretion? Provide a guideline for expected hours of availability, office hours in the residence hall, campus view days, orientation events, etc.

22 Establishing ILCs: from idea to implementation Policies and Program Parameters: Implementation of Theme and Mission Representation  Determine the manner by which the theme and mission of the ILC is represented Create brochures and pamphlets that provide the purpose and intention of the ILC Provide clear guidelines for participant inclusion in the program Infuse the residence hall environment and classroom with activities related to the theme of the ILC As much as possible, collaborate with Faculty to include residence hall activities, i.e. lectures, theme dinners, outings, in the syllabi provided to students

23 Establishing ILCs: from idea to implementation Policies and Program Parameters: Process for students relative to…  Academic interests and/or standing changes Does the student have to move to another residence hall if they lose interest and/or do not maintain expected participation in the program? Is there an appeal process in the case where a certain GPA level must be maintained for participation in the ILC and a student fails to maintain said GPA?  Disciplinary concerns What are the implications if a student is involved in a judicial situation? Are the rules different? Does the FIR have any role in a disciplinary situation? Are additional considerations in play because of the sensitivity surrounding a ‘special’ program?

24 Establishing ILCs: from idea to implementation Ongoing Feedback Structure  Implementing a Planning Committee Who will continue the efforts on a more routine basis throughout the year?  Meeting Frequency Operationalizing communication  Defining responsibilities of each participating department Who will be responsible for assessing the program? Who will be coordinating with Academics? Who will handle day-to-day issues that arise?  Determining achieved success

25 Implementation Ongoing planning team meetings Quarterly progress reports Staff check-ins  Expectations  Program Implementation Review departmental roles and contributions

26 Assessment EBI Fall and Spring Supplemental Surveys Focus Groups On-site visitations Staff evaluations Additional assessment efforts

27 Assessment – Rose Hill

28 Longitudinal Cumulative Comparison - GPA Assessment – Lincoln Center

29 Residents: N = 74 Commuters: N = 48

30 Ongoing Considerations Based on the outcome of assessment measures, program modifications should be implemented accordingly Share the results (positive and constructive) of the assessment data Continue to increase Faculty and Constituent Involvement Maintain an environment that is open to suggestions and input from other involved parties Promote increased Faculty use of designated space in the Residence Halls Navigate Inter-Divisional relationships, utilize and encourage colleagues within your area to contribute their talents Continue to develop residential and commuter Educational Initiatives Expansion of Integrated Learning Communities Further Development of ILC and Plunge Initiatives Maintenance of quality of existing ILCs Maintaining interest

31 Questions and Comments


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