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Promoting Student Success in College NMHEAR 2012 Conference Albuquerque, New Mexico February 23, 2012 Vincent Tinto Syracuse University (315) 443-4763.

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Presentation on theme: "Promoting Student Success in College NMHEAR 2012 Conference Albuquerque, New Mexico February 23, 2012 Vincent Tinto Syracuse University (315) 443-4763."— Presentation transcript:

1 Promoting Student Success in College NMHEAR 2012 Conference Albuquerque, New Mexico February 23, 2012 Vincent Tinto Syracuse University (315)

2 Promoting classroom success Promoting college completion Closing thoughts Overview

3 Moving from Teaching to Learning Focusing on the conditions in classrooms that enhance student success.

4 Conditions for Classroom Success  Expectations  Clear, consistent, accurate information  High expectations

5 Promoting Classroom Success Expectations  Advising Knowing the path to completion Institution Program Classroom  Maintaining Standards of Performance Consistency of words and actions

6 Conditions for Classroom Success  Expectations  Support  Academic Support  Social Support

7 Promoting Classroom Success Expectations Support  Academic support services to connect and/or integrate support within the classroom Supplemental instruction Accelerated learning Contextualization Embedded academic support (I-Best ) Basic skills learning communities

8 Supplemental Instruction (SI) A B C D Instructor Tutor A Tutor B Tutor C Tutor D Freshman English Supplemental Study Groups

9 Accelerated Learning College English Supplemental Study Group

10  LaGuardia CC - ESL Linked Courses ESL Developmental English Accounting

11 “The relationship in classes between accounting and ESL is helping a lot because the accounting professor is teaching us to answer questions in complete sentences … to write better. And we are more motivated to learn vocabulary because it is accounting vocabulary, something we want to learn about. I am learning accounting better by learning the accounting language.”

12 Conditions for Classroom Success  Expectations  Support  Assessment and Feedback  Institutional monitoring of progress  Classroom assessment of performance

13 Promoting Classroom Success Expectations Support Feedback  Entry assessment and placement  Early warning Signals Project Predictive Analytics  Classroom assessment One-minute paper Automated response systems

14 Conditions for Classroom Success  Expectations  Support  Feedback  Engagement  Contact with students, faculty, and staff  Active engagement in learning with others  Intensity / time-on-task

15 Promoting Classroom Success Expectations Support Feedback Involvement  Pedagogies of engagement Cooperative learning, Problem-based / Project-based learning Learning communities Service learning

16 Linked Courses English 100 Freshman Seminar

17  Freshman Interest Groups U.S. History U.S. History Freshman Seminar Freshman Seminar English 001

18  SI Learning Communities Mathematics 100 Chemistry Supplemental Instruction Groups

19 Promising Practices Structured First-Year Programs ➤ Statway: Rethinking Development Mathematics ➤ New Faculty Development: Taking Teaching Seriously ➤ Richland Community College

20 Promoting Student Completion Identifying roadblocks and momentum points ➔ Focus action to promote timely attainment of intermediate points of achievement (e.g. accelerated learning, intensive first-year programs, stopouts)

21 Promoting Student Completion Identifying roadblocks and momentum points Constructing coherent pathways to completion ➔ Aligning courses to promote timely completion

22 CONNECTION ENTRYPROGRESS COMPLETION P ROMOTING S TUDENT S UCCESS : B UILDING P ATHWAYS, C REATING M OMENTUM A System Designed for Student Completion E NROLLMENT TO C OMPLETION OF G ATEKEEPER C OURSES E NTRY TO C OURSE OF S TUDY TO 75% C OMPLETION OF D EGREE R EQUIREMENTS C OMPLETE C OURSE OF S TUDY F OR C REDENTIAL I NTEREST TO A PPLICATION

23 Closing Thoughts Student success does not arise by chance

24 Closing Thoughts Student success does not arise by chance ➔ It requires intentional, structured, and proactive action

25 Closing Thoughts Student success does not arise by chance No where is student success more important than in the first year and in the classrooms of the first year

26 Closing Thoughts Student success does not arise by chance No where is student success more important than in the first year and in the classrooms of the first year “Stay the course.” Improvement takes time!

27 Resources: Successful Programs L. Muraskin and J. Lee, Raising the Graduation Rates of Low-Income College Students. Washington D.C., The Pell Institute for the Study of Opportunity in Higher Education. McClenney, K A Matter of Degrees: Promising Practices for Community College Success. Austin, TX., Community College Survey of Student Engagement.

28 Resources: Developmental Education Community College Research Center

29 Resources: Supplemental Instruction El Camino Community College

30 Resources: Cooperative Learning Barbara Millis Cooperative Learning in Higher Education. (Sterling, VA: Stylus Publishing). Barkley, E, K.P. Cross, and C. Howell-Major Collaborative Learning Techniques: A Handbook for College Faculty. (San Francisco: Jossey-Bass).

31 Resources: Problem-Based Learning  University of Delaware: Institute for Problem-Based Learning (http://www.udel.edu/pb) Maricopa Center for Learning & Instruction, Maricopa Community Colleges (http://www.mcli.dist.maricopa.edu/pbl) Jose Amador (2006), The Practice of Problem-Based Learning: A Guide to Implementing PBL in the College Classroom. Anker Publishing.

32 Resources: Learning Communities The Learning Community Commons The Washington Center for Undergraduate Education, The Evergreen State College

33 The Learning Community Listserv Evergreen State College Gillies Malnarich and Emily Lardner Co-Directors, The Washington Center Resources: Learning Communities

34 Resources: Basic Skills Instruction Integrated Basic Skills IBEST-Highline Community College

35 Resources: Basic Skills Instruction Strengthening Pre-Collegiate Education in Community Colleges (SPECC) index.asp?key=26

36 Resources: Classroom Assessment Thomas Angelo and Patricia Cross, Classroom Assessment Techniques: A Handbook for College Teachers (2nd Edition, San Francisco: Jossey-Bass) Huba, M. and J. Freed Learner-Centered Assessment on College Campuses: Shifting Focus from Teaching to Learning (New York: Allyn & Bacon)

37 Resources: First Year of College Foundations of Excellence In the First Year of College


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