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Housing Styles Copyright (c) Texas Education Agency, 2012. All rights reserved. 1.

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Presentation on theme: "Housing Styles Copyright (c) Texas Education Agency, 2012. All rights reserved. 1."— Presentation transcript:

1 Housing Styles Copyright (c) Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved. 1

2 AB 2

3  Many current home designs are modifications of Early American styles.  As the country has grown, styles have spread across the continent.  Styles have been modified to fit weather conditions, terrain, local available materials and the economy.  Today, technology has made it possible to adapt many housing styles. Copyright (c) Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved. 3

4  All houses of a certain style do not look identical  Architects and builders often add their personal stamps  Look for an overall “feeling” of a style and design details Copyright (c) Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved. 4

5  Architectural history divided into periods  Each Period Historical events Characteristic styles  One period may flow into another and may overlap  Historical homes that remain were built of durable materials Copyright (c) Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved. 5

6   American architecture dates back to the colonial times.  English settlements looked very much like the homes left behind in England (Half Timbered homes).  North eastern colonies consisted of many Cape Cod Style homes. Copyright (c) Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved. 6

7  Rectangular Design  Central chimney  Pitched roof  Interior divided into one large room (great room) and one or two small rooms  If 2 stories, limited space on 2 nd floor  Prompted the invention of the gambrel roof Copyright (c) Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved. 7

8 8

9  Began as a two-story pitched roof house  Additional set of rooms was built along the back side of the house  Roof line brought down to cover the added rooms  The roof slope resembled the cover of the wooden salt boxes of that time Copyright (c) Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved. 9

10 10

11  The second story projects out over the first story  Taken from Elizabethan houses in the late 1500s  The overhang was used for protection back then to prevent intruders from scaling the wall Copyright (c) Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved. 11

12 Copyright (c) Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved. 12

13  House built of adobe, brick or stucco  Stucco – plaster material made with cement, sand and lime  Rounded archways and windows  Tiled roofs; often mission tile  Inner courtyards  Balconies and porches that went around the outside of the house  Similar to the Mission Style Copyright (c) Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved. 13

14 Copyright (c) Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved. 14

15  High, steep roofs  Wood or stone  Porch covered by a broad roof  Many doors and windows to allow for the flow of air  Galleries or roofed balconies added  Posts supporting balconies were made of wood or ornamental iron  French Quarter, New Orleans Copyright (c) Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved. 15

16 Copyright (c) Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved. Photo taken in the French Quarter, LA. 16

17 Copyright (c) Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved. 17

18  Much Variation Frontier-Rough shelters East coast- Elegant homes and furniture Immigrant Style-  English/timber, sawed into boards,  Dutch/stone & brick,  German/wood & quarry stone,  Swedes/squared logs,  Spanish/cut stone and adobe brick Copyright (c) Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved. 18

19  Georgian Period Link to England Prosperity Formal Style popular in England  Federal Period Attitude toward England changed Won American Revolution Styles that expressed America’s Independence Adam Style and Early Classical Revival Style Copyright (c) Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved. 19

20  Style that was popular in England named after King George I, II and III  Constructed of brick and stone  Contrasting materials (red brick and white wood)  Central chimney or chimney at each end of the house  Formal balanced design Copyright (c) Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved. 20

21  2-3 stories high  Pitched roof with gable or hip roof  Symmetrically placed large windows (with many small panes)  Front door focal point of house (with pilasters and a pediment)  Door with decorative panels  Distinctive cornice Copyright (c) Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved. 21

22  Square or rectangular  Central section with at wing on each side (kitchen/offices and guest wing)  Central hall with wide staircase Copyright (c) Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved. 22

23 Copyright (c) Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved. 23

24  Built by factory owners for renting to their employees  Continuous line of two- or three-story homes that share a common wall  Also called Brownstone or town homes Copyright (c) Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved. 24

25  Made up of two periods:  Romantic Revival Period More frequent travel prompted styles from other areas Greek Revival Style – Southern Plantation style; used in many public buildings Gothic Revival Style - Pointed arches and circular windows with ornamental carved stone Italianate Style – Square two-stories with wide overhanging hip roofs; long narrow windows Copyright (c) Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved. 25

26  Victorian Period 1860-end of century Very elaborate homes Detail taken from medieval and European styles Mansard and Queen Anne - popular styles in this period Copyright (c) Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved. 26

27  s  A popular Victorian style  Irregular steep roof  Ornamental gables  Decorative wood shingles for siding  Wraparound porches with railings and columns  Circular tower that extends the entire height of the building  Gingerbread detailing (lacy-look cutout wood trim) Copyright (c) Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved. 27

28 Copyright (c) Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved. 28

29  Period Revival Styles Brought back Georgian, Saltbox, and Cape Cod  Modern Styles Architects wanted to create something different Prairie, Craftsman and International  Postwar Modern Styles New innovative styles Contemporary, Split-Level and Shed Copyright (c) Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved. 29

30   Features a half timbered look  Steeply pitched gables at the front and sides  Tall, narrow windows placed in groups with many small panes  Massive chimneys  Stucco, brick and stone exteriors Copyright (c) Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved. 30

31 Copyright (c) Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved. 31

32  Distinctive door and window features  Prominent door with pediment and pilasters (entry porch)  Symmetrical windows in pairs Copyright (c) Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved. 32

33 Copyright (c) Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved. 33

34  20 th century design  Originated with Frank Lloyd Wright  Horizontal lines  Low pitched roofs with overhanging eaves  Wide porches  Row of leaded glass windows  Rooms flow into each other (open spacious feel) Copyright (c) Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved. 34

35 Copyright (c) Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved. 35

36  Early 1950s-1960s  Low long, one-story house  Low pitched gable or hip roof  Decorative shutters  Decorative wooden or iron porch roof supports  Picture windows  Outdoor living areas in the rear Copyright (c) Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved. 36

37 Copyright (c) Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved. 37

38  Popular in the 1950s  Modification o f the Ranch-Style homes  Horizontal lines, low pitched roof  Three levels of living space connected with short flights of stairs  May have a basement  Takes advantage of a sloping lot  May be built on a level lot Copyright (c) Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved. 38

39 Copyright (c) Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved. 39

40  Environment  History  Political Conditions  Economic conditions  Social Conditions  Past used as inspiration  Elements of styles combined to create new styles  New forms and shapes Copyright (c) Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved. 40

41 Copyright (c) Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved. AB 41


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