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The Hume Workforce Development Committee Hume Regional Development Australia Arts and Recreation Services Labour Market Snapshot Workforce Planning Australia.

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Presentation on theme: "The Hume Workforce Development Committee Hume Regional Development Australia Arts and Recreation Services Labour Market Snapshot Workforce Planning Australia."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Hume Workforce Development Committee Hume Regional Development Australia Arts and Recreation Services Labour Market Snapshot Workforce Planning Australia | December 2012

2 Arts and Recreation Services Industry 2 | The Arts and Recreation Services Industry as defined by ANZSIC includes the following sectors. Source: Employment outlook for Arts and Recreation Services, Skills Info, 2012 Amusement and other Recreation Activities Horse and Dog Racing Gambling Activities Sports and Physical Recreation Activities Creative and performing Arts Parks and Gardens Museum Operations

3 Arts and Recreation Services Industry Snapshot 3 | Arts and Recreation Services is the third smallest of 19 industries classified under ANZSIC*. In August 2012 approximately 218,000 people were employed in the Arts and Recreation field across Australia. Between 2007 and 2012, employment increased at an rate of 2% per annum. Between 2012 – 2016/17 employment is projected to increase 1.6% per annum, equivalent to a total of 7,800 people. The Arts and Recreation Services industry has a large part-time workforce, with 45% of people in the industry working part time. At 54% of the total workforce men slightly out number women in the industry, but this ratio varies markedly between industry segments. The industry employs large numbers of contractors, freelancers and volunteers. Source: DEEWR, SkillsInfo, 2012; * Australian New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification

4 Arts and Recreation Services Industry Data 4 | ‘Arts and Recreation’ ABS ‘Culture and Recreation’ Skills Hub Victorian’ Industry Training Advisory Board body ‘Sport, Recreation and Fitness’ Service Skills Australia (SSA) Industry Skills Council Key sources of employment data and trends on the Arts and Recreation industry is provided by ABS; Service Skills Australia, the Industry Skills Council covering these sectors; and Skills Hub, the Victorian Industry Training Advisory Board. These key data sources cover different industry segments but there is also overlap.

5 Arts and Recreation Services Industry Data Sources 5 | Source: DEEWR, Skills Info, 2012, Skills Hub, SSA, Sport, Recreation and Fitness Environmental Scan The segments covered by each of the three data sources within the Arts and Recreation Services is listed below. Arts and Recreation (ABS)Culture and Recreation (Skills Hub) Service Skills Australia (Sport. Recreation and Fitness) Sports and Recreation ActivitiesSports and Physical Recreation Activities Sport and Physical recreation instruction and coaching Creative and Performing Arts Activities Creative and performing Arts Activities Fitness centre (and similar facilities) operations Museum Operation Sporting and Recreation Clubs Gambling ActivitiesLibraries and ArchivesProfessional teams Parks and Gardens OperationsMotion pictures & Video ActivitiesSporting Grounds and Venues Horse and Dog RacingSound recording and music publishing Sports Associations Amusement and other Recreation Activities Radio BroadcastingTourism Television BroadcastingEvents Amusement and Other Recreation Activities

6 National Industry Overview

7 Arts and Recreation Services Industry Employment Arts and Recreation Services is the third smallest of 19 industries classified under ANZICS. In August 2012 approximately 218,000 people were employed in the industry. 7 | Source: ABS Labour Force Survey (trend data) cat no , DEEWR, Skills Info Industry Employment Level February 2012

8 Arts and Recreation Services Historical Employment Growth 8 | Source: ABS Labour Force Survey (trend data) cat no , DEEWR, Skills Info 2012 Employment levels have been increasing for more than a decade. In 2012 more than 218,000 were employed in the sector compared to 153,000 in Employment levels, fluctuate from year to year reflecting the volatility of the sector.

9 Arts and Recreation Services Projected Employment Level by segment (%) 9 | Source: ABS Labour Force Survey (trend data) cat no (DEEWR Projections), DEEWR, SkilisInfo,2012 The largest industry segment is ‘Sports, Physical Recreation Activities’, which employs more than 87,000 people. This is nearly double the next highest segment, ‘Creative, Performing Arts Activities’, which employs just over 48,000 people.

10 Arts and Recreation Services Projected Employment Growth (‘000) 10 | Source: ABS Labour Force Survey (trend data) cat no (DEEWR Projections), DEEWR, Skillsinfo, 2012 All Arts and Recreation segments are projected to experience lower employment growth than the average for all industries of 1.4% per annum. Two segments, ‘Horse and Dog Racing’ and ‘Amusement, Other Recreation Activities’ are expected to experience a decline in employment.

11 Arts and Recreation Services Projected Employment Growth (%) 11 | Source: ABS Labour Force Survey (trend data) cat no (DEEWR Projections), DEEWR, SkillsInfo 2012 The Arts and Recreation industry is expected to experience employment growth of more than 5,000 people by The ‘Horse and Dog Racing’ segment is projected to decrease by 500 people across Australia over the same timeframe.

12 Arts and Recreation Services – Top 20 Occupations 12 | Source: ABS Labour Force Survey (trend data) cat no , DEEWR, SkillsInfo, 2012 The top three employing occupations in the industry are associated with sport and fitness. They are ‘Sports Coaches, Instructors and Officials’, ‘Fitness Instructors’ and ‘Sportspersons’. In 2011, there were more than 14,000 of the first group in Australia.

13 Industry Overview Victoria

14 Arts and Recreation Services: A Victorian Perspective 14 | Source: Deloitte Access Economics, Victorian skills needs in 2011: A summary of industry intelligence (Skills Victoria), March research for Skills Victoria that analysed Victoria’s skills need by Industry Training Advisory Boards (ITABs) industry categories found: In 2009 the ‘Culture and Recreation’ sector employed 61,831 people in Victoria In 2010 this number dropped by 12.2% Employment was forecast to rise in 2011, 2012 and 2013 Employment growth of 4.8% was projected for This report also noted. ’The size of the industry and extent of its skill needs are hard to define due to the nature of its workforce, which is made up of a large number of contractors, freelancers and volunteers’.

15 Culture and Recreation Services Occupations in Demand in Victoria 15 | Source: Deloitte Access Economics, Victorian skills needs in 2011: A summary of industry intelligence (Skills Victoria), March 2011 Occupation In DemandCritical Skills Shortages Outdoor Adventure Instructors Aqua Instructors (Swimming coaches and instructors) Sport Umpire and Other Sports Officials Digital Broadcast Technicians Camera Operators (particularly focus pullers) Games Designers Digital Archivists and Content Managers Piano Tuners Private Teachers/Tutors (art, drama, dance and music) SkillsHub advised the following occupations were in demand in Some were also expected to experience critical skill shortages.

16 Arts and Recreation Services Drivers of Workforce Demand and Workforce Development 16 | Workforce Demand and Development Participation levels in Sport, Recreation and Fitness Growing interest in fitness Role of sport in preventative health Availability and funding of venues and facilities Ageing population Reducing talent pool for elite sport New Technology= New Skills/ Source: Service Skills Australia, Sport, Recreation and Fitness, Environmental Scan 2012

17 Arts and Recreation: Drivers of Workforce Demand and Workforce Development 17 | Source: Deloitte Access Economics, Victorian skills needs in 2011: A summary of industry intelligence (Skills Victoria), March 2011 Participation levels in Sport, Recreation and Fitness Participation in sport, recreation and fitness is a key driver of demand for employment in these industries. Between 2005—06 and the percentage of people that reported participating in sport and physical recreation in the previous year declined slightly from 65.9% to 63.6% nationally. In Victoria 64.6% of people participate in sport and recreation The highest rate of participation is in informal activities e.g. Walking Between and , the average weekly household consumption on recreation increased by 41% or $41.00 However expenditure on pay TV and Internet service were the main drivers of this growth. Sport and Recreation accounted for only a quarter of this growth in expenditure. Growing interest in Fitness While participation in formal sports and recreation is showing some decline, participation in aerobics, fitness and gyms is increasing. The number of people participating in Aerobics/Fitness activities or gyms increased from 12.6% in to 14% in Role of Sport in Preventative Health The Council of Australian Governments Agreement (COAG) National Partnership Agreement includes a focus on strategies to improve physical activity in communities and workplaces. Community grants are subsidising people’s participation in physical activities. e.g. ‘Lift for Life’ program for people at risk of Type 2 diabetes. Such programs are increasing the need for Cert IV personal trainers, exercise physiologists and physiotherapists. Service Skills Australia research suggests that in the future GPs will refer patients for exercise, which is likely to increase the demand for higher level trained fitness professionals.

18 Arts and Recreation: Drivers of Workforce Demand and Workforce Development 18 | Source: Service Skills Australia, Environmental Scan 2012 Availability and funding for venues and facilities Between and 2009/10 construction works for recreation purposes increased. The total value of work completed on recreation projects in was 1,342.9 million more than double the total of $662million. This is helping drive demand for workers. An increasing number of local councils are restricting the number of micro-business personal trainers using public spaces for group fitness. In regional areas, new 24 hour gyms are being established in areas lacking full service gyms. Anytime Fitness has 60% of its recently opened gyms located in regional areas. These 24 hour gyms have lower staff ratios. While they have lower staff ratios than other fitness gym models they may be increasing job opportunities for fitness professionals in areas where they were previously limited. Ageing population is driving Participation in physical activity decreases as people age. It drops from 79% for year olds to 48% for people aged 65 and over. An ageing population could result in decreased demand for organised sport and recreation and the associated staff. However the ageing population is also driving a renewed focus on stimulating grass roots participation, which is driving demand for Sport Development Officers. The industry is increasingly looking to cater for an ageing population by developing seniors’ fitness programs, which will mean fitness professionals will need increasingly to understand the needs of seniors and how to engage them in physical activity and adapt activities to cater for their needs and interests. Reducing talent pool for elite sport The ageing population combined with a low birth rate has reduced the talent pool for elite sport. This in turn is creating the need for coaches of high performers to develop higher level skills in areas such as performance analysis and skill acquisition. This requires higher level ICT skills.

19 Arts and Recreation: Drivers of Workforce Demand and Workforce Development 19 | Source: Service Skills Australia, Environmental Scan 2012 New technology = New Skills While information is limited, industry feedback suggests sporting clubs and associations, gyms and other fitness and recreational organisations are developing on-line services. This is in response to customer expectations that the customer service relations will include online, social media and smart phones. Skills in retailing, copyright and social marketing are increasingly being required. Social media is allowing people to set up recreational and casual sport groups by passing the traditional role of clubs and other recreational organisations in bring people together. The availability of a growing number of smart phone ‘apps’, which offer personalised fitness programs is leading to concerns by fitness professionals that their services will be bypassed. This new technology is necessitating new marketing, retailing and entertainment practices. Sector particularly affected include television, film, game design.

20 Hume Overview

21 Arts and Recreation Services Assistance by LGA 2006 vs Census Data 21 | Towong 20 (2006) Wodonga 106 (2006) Alpine 82 (2006) Mansfield 39 (2006) Hume Region Boundary Sub-region Boundary Local Government Area (LGA) Boundary Indigo 58 (2006) Murrindindi 110 (2011) Mitchell 219 (2006) Strathbogie 49 (2006) G Shepparton Moira 68 (2006) Wangaratta 118 (2006) Benalla 73(2006) 182 (2006) 95 (2011) 112 (2011) 56 (2011) 134 (2011) 11 (2011) 137 (2011) 43 (2011) 96 (2006) 203 (2011) 211 (2011) 79 (2011) 99 (2006) Total Industry 1,113 (2006) 1,287 (2011) Source: ABS Census Data 2006 and ABS Census Data 2011 *All figured have been rounded 16%*

22 Employment growth Projection in Hume ‘Sports and Fitness workers’ is the largest occupational group working in the Arts and Recreation Industry in Hume. Monash data estimates there are more than 500 people working as ‘Sports and Fitness workers’ in Hume. The data suggests the employment levels will experience a small decline between and | Usage is restricted to the Department of Education & Early Childhood Development and third parties undertaking work on behalf of Skills Victoria. Source: Monash Centre of Policy Studies, 2011 (Hume Employment: by ANZSCO occupation, '000 persons, to )

23 Employment Projections in Hume According to Monash projections employment will very slowly decline between and NB: Because it is such a diverse industry it is possible that there will be pockets of growth as well as pockets of decline. 23 | Usage is restricted to the Department of Education & Early Childhood Development and third parties undertaking work on behalf of Skills Victoria. Source: Monash Centre of Policy Studies, 2011 (Hume Employment: by ANZSCO occupation, '000 persons, to )

24 Arts and Recreation VET Education Data Fitness Instructor

25

26 Fitness Instructor VET Enrolments Age Profile 26 | Source: Data prepared 9 March 2012, Market Analysis team, Skills Victoria. Between 2008 and 2011 VET enrolments in Fitness Instructor certificate qualifications increased markedly. Enrolments jumped from approximately 115 in 2008 to more than 300 in The vast majority of people studying to become fitness instructors are aged between

27 VET Course and Diversity 27 | Source: Data prepared 9 March 2012, Market Analysis team, Skills Victoria. Between 2008 and 2011 the number of people studying qualifications in fitness more than tripled. In 2011 more than 330 people in Hume were enrolled in Fitness Qualifications. In 2011 the enrolments by people from diversity groups were low, but higher than in There were no recorded enrolments by indigenous or CALD groups in 2008.

28 What this means? Arts and Recreation Services is the third smallest of 19 industries classified under ANZSIC and employs approximately 218,000 people. Between 2007 and 2012, employment increased across Australia at a rate of 2% per annum but for the next five years employment growth is expected to slow to 1.6% growth per annum. The largest segment is ‘Sports, Physical Recreation Activities’, employing 87,000 people. The ‘Horse and Dog Racing’ segment is one of only two segments projected to experience decreases in employment levels. A number of specialist areas within the sport and fitness industry, e.g. Seniors’ Fitness Programs are expected to grow. Skill shortages exist for Outdoor Adventure Guides. Employment in Arts and Recreation in Hume is expected to show a very small decline over the next five years. There are more than 500 Sports and Fitness Workers, the largest occupation in the industry in the Hume Region. Between 2006 and 2011 VET enrolments in Fitness Instructor qualifications in Hume jumped from 115 to more than |

29 Data Quality and Limitations The data challenges included: 1. Different definitions of industries / occupations between ABS, Industry Skills Councils and Monash. 2. Different Time periods used by different sources 3. Old Data - ABS Census is now 6 years old ABS Census data has been used where available. 4. Lack of HUME region industry data particularly for industries where employers are predominantly private sector (e.g. Retail, manufacturing and Transport and Logistics) 5. Lack of regional Skills Shortage Data – DEEWR lists are at the State level 6. Changes in name and level of VET qualifications (training packages) 7. Poor sourcing of data – The data source and date were unclear for some data sources. Limitation of Liability This Labour Market Snapshot has been compiled using data which, to the best of Workforce Planning Australia’s knowledge, was current and correct at the time of printing. WPA gives no warranty as to the accuracy of the information contained herein nor its applicability to any specific circumstances. It is intended as a guide only and Workforce Planning Australia will not be liable to any person as a result of any actual or perceived inaccuracy contained in this report.


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