Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

WALT: What was life like for a Victorian Woman…? This Picture is the Answer – What is the Question. Come up with at least three Questions. IE How was the.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "WALT: What was life like for a Victorian Woman…? This Picture is the Answer – What is the Question. Come up with at least three Questions. IE How was the."— Presentation transcript:

1 WALT: What was life like for a Victorian Woman…? This Picture is the Answer – What is the Question. Come up with at least three Questions. IE How was the Vote for Women won?

2 Prezi &utm_medium=copy&rc=ex0share

3 WALT: What was life like for a Victorian Woman…? WILFS: 4 Describe the Victorian ideal. 5 Explain why Victorian women were annoyed. 6 Compare the life of a Victorian woman to modern day.

4 TASKS TASK ONE is to write a Lonely Hearts advert for a Victorian Woman. Based on the ideal Victorian Woman. TASK TWO is to complete a timeline of the Suffrage movement. TASK THREE is to Explain why women could not vote, what why did men prevent them… TASK FOUR is to Write counter arguments to the Men's P.O.V. TASK FIVE is to Examine the Source material on the IWB

5 Lonely Hearts for a Victorian Woman. TASK ONE Read the Information. Create your own Lonely Heart ad for a Victorian Woman. Be creative but informative. EXTENSION: Did all women have to be like this ? “Single, angelic, & obedient brown haired woman… seeks my better half. Willing to be my husbands possession. I know not to speak till spoken to.” Angelic. A wife provided a safe and loving home for her children and husband. Known as the Angel in the House. Obedient. A wife obeyed her husband in everything. A famous Victorian write said ‘The true destiny of a woman is to wed a man. Pale and Delicate A wife was expected to look slim and delicate. Pale skin was the sign of a well bred woman. Tanned skin was a sign of a woman working. A BIG no no. A Possession When a woman married she became the legal possession of her husband… Silent A woman was seen as less intelligent than a man. In every way physical or mental the average woman is inferior to the average man….

6 1832 The Great Reform Act excludes women from voting by defining voters as 'male’ First petition on women's suffrage presented to Parliament First debate on women's suffrage in Parliament, led by JS Mill The Women's Franchise League aims to win the vote for women 1897 (NUWSS), led by Millicent Fawcett ( ) (WSPU) is founded in Manchester by Emmeline Pankhurst ( ) 1905Suffragette militancy begins. They started using force (illegal). 1907The Women's Freedom League is formed after a break from the WSPU 1908 Hunger striking by Marion Wallace-Dunlop adopted as a WSPU strategy 1909 Forcible-feeding begins Parliament considers various 'Conciliation Bills' would have given some women the vote The suffragette Emily Wilding Davison ( ) hides in a cupboard on census night 1913 'The Cat and Mouse Act', is introduced, targeting suffragettes on hunger-strike 1914 World War One. During the war years, an estimated two million women replace men in traditionally male jobs 1916 A conference on electoral reform. Limited women's suffrage is recommended 1918 Act is passed giving women over 30 and either they, or their husband, meet a property qualification the vote The Qualification of Women Act is passed on 21 November allowing women to stand for Parliament 1918 Women vote in a general election for the first time on 14 December with 8.5 million women eligible The Equal Franchise Act is passed giving women equal voting rights with men. Fifteen million women are eligible 1929 On 30 May women aged between 21 and 29 vote for the first time. This general election is sometimes referred to as the Flapper Election

7 Timeline of the Women Suffrage movement. TASK TWO Draw a timeline in your book with the key points (IN BOLD) EXTENSION: Why is the World War such an important turning point. Look at

8 TASK THREE Explain in as much detail as you can “Why women didn’t have the vote. What were the opinions of men and some women at the time”? EXTENSION: Why did some women NOT want the vote ? Timeline of the Women Suffrage movement. “Men can look after women’s interest. We’ve made laws limiting the hours women work in factories and now we let women go to university.” “Women are irrational, hysterical and not capable of making important decisions. How can we let them vote”. “Men and women have different roles. The woman’s place is at home looking after the family.” “Most women don’t want the vote. It’s just a nosy few that are demanding women’s right. My husband looks after me perfectly well. He gives me a good allowance…” “Man was created by God to rule over women. Not the other way around.”

9 TASK FOUR Draw a quick reminder of the key events of the Suffrage Movement. Use Quick Symbols. Drawing Reminder… World War One Suffragettes begin Hunger Strikes. Emily Davidson commits suicide at Race Day. FORCE FEEDING BEGINS (by men to suffragettes) Suffragettes begin militancy (illegal force)

10 Comparison & Evaluation. TASK SIX is to Compare the Lives of Victorian Women to Modern Day. Dear Readers, I am writing to tell you about the lives of Victorian women. They were expected to look like … and behave … The men treated them … They refused them the right to vote because …

11 Pair and Share. What have you learnt today. HOMEWORK Who was Emily Pankhurst and what did she want?


Download ppt "WALT: What was life like for a Victorian Woman…? This Picture is the Answer – What is the Question. Come up with at least three Questions. IE How was the."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google