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Measuring Disproportionate Impact and Identifying Factors that Impact Hispanic Student Completion Rates Unpacking the Student Success Scorecard Matthew.

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Presentation on theme: "Measuring Disproportionate Impact and Identifying Factors that Impact Hispanic Student Completion Rates Unpacking the Student Success Scorecard Matthew."— Presentation transcript:

1 Measuring Disproportionate Impact and Identifying Factors that Impact Hispanic Student Completion Rates Unpacking the Student Success Scorecard Matthew Wetstein, Ph.D., Vice President of Instruction, San Joaquin Delta College Alice van Ommeren, Ed.D., Dean, Research, Analysis and Accountability, CCCCO Alyssa Nguyen, Senior Research Analyst, San Joaquin Delta College Sabrina Sencil, Research Analyst, San Joaquin Delta College Tom Leigh, Ph.D., Research Program Specialist II, CCCCO

2 Background Increasing attention to reducing the achievement gap (outcomes) Policymakers and administrators are inquiring about the racial disparities Researchers are being tasked to measure and explain inequities and disparities Hispanic enrollment is increasing, but a persistent completion gap exits.

3 Caution Racial categories are constructs and do not capture social, cultural, economic and political issues surrounding racial diversity. Differences in outcomes are due to underlying social, cultural, economic issues associated with race/ethnicity.

4 Measuring Disproportionate Impact Existing Legislation or Policy – Title 5, Section 55512(a) Assessment process and its impact Terms of ethnicity, gender, age or disability – Student Success Task Force Recommendation to disaggregate Demographics, including race/ethnicity – Title 5, Section Student Equity Plans Revised and due in Fall 2014

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7 2013 Scorecard Completion COHORT 2013 Scorecard Cohort OUTCOME Attained Completion Outcome

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9 Completion Percentage of degree and/or transfer-seeking students tracked for six years through who completed a degree, certificate or transfer related outcomes.

10 Measuring Disproportionate Impact Two Methods: 80-Percent Rule Proportionality Index

11 The 80 Percent Rule The 80 Percent Rule methodology is based on the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) 80% Rule, outlined in the 1978 Uniform Guidelines on Employee Selection Procedures, and was used in Title VII enforcement by the U.S. Equal Opportunity Commission, Department of Labor, and the Department of Justice.

12 The 80% Rule states that: “A selection rate for any race, sex, or ethnic group which is less than four- fifths (4/5) (or eighty percent) of the rate for the group with the highest rate will generally be regarded by the Federal enforcement agencies as evidence of adverse impact, while a greater than four-fifths rate will generally not be regarded by Federal enforcement agencies as evidence of adverse impact.” The 80 Percent Rule (cont’d)

13 Three Steps: 1.Calculate the frequency and percent of disaggregated subgroups in cohort and outcome groups. 2.Calculate the percent attainment of each subgroup. Divide the outcome count by the cohort count. 3.Divide the percent attainment of each subgroup by the percent attainment of a reference group to obtain the 80 Percent Ratio. Calculating the 80 Percent Ratio

14 Step One. Calculate the frequency and percent of disaggregated subgroups in cohort and outcome groups. Race/Ethnicity 2013 Scorecard CohortCompletion Outcome CountPercentCountPercent African American12, , American Indian1, Asian28, , Hispanic56, , Pacific Islander1, Unknown15, , White60, ,

15 Step Two. Calculate the percent attainment of each group. Divide the outcome count by the cohort count. Race/Ethnicity 2013 Scorecard CohortCompletion Outcome Percent Completion CountPercentCountPercent African American12, , American Indian1, Asian28, , Hispanic56, , Pacific Islander1, Unknown15, , White60, ,

16 Step Three. Divide the percent attainment of each subgroup by the percent attainment of a reference group to obtain an 80 Percent Ratio. How to pick the reference group? Original EEOC legislation mandated the highest- performing group. CCCCO suggests the largest subgroup as the reference group. or When there is not a clear majority or the majority percentage may not be the best choice (e.g., the percent of the largest majority is less than the overall rate) one can use the overall rate as the reference.

17 Step Three. Divide the percent attainment of each subgroup by the percent attainment of a reference group to obtain an 80 Percent Ratio. Race/Ethnicity 2013 Scorecard Cohort Completion Outcome Percent Completion 80-Percent Ratio CountPercentCountPercent African American12, , American Indian1, Asian28, , Hispanic56, , Pacific Islander1, Unknown15, , White60, ,

18 Proportionality Divide the percentage of each race/ethnicity in the outcome group by its percent in the cohort.

19 Interpreting the Proportionality Index Proportionality IndexInterpretation 1.0 Proportions of subgroups in cohort and outcome are equal. Less Than 1.0 Subgroup is less prevalent in the outcome group than the cohort. More Than 1.0 Subgroup is more prevalent in the outcome group than the cohort.

20 Race/Ethnicity 2013 Scorecard CohortCompletion Outcome Proportionality CountPercentCountPercent African American12, , American Indian1, Asian28, , Hispanic56, , Pacific Islander1, Unknown15, , White60, , Proportionality: Divide the percentage of each race/ethnicity in the outcome group by its percent in the cohort.

21 Summary Statistics Mean0.86 Median0.85 Minimum0.64 Maximum1.28 Range0.64 Hispanic 2013 Scorecard Completion Rate Proportionality by College

22 *First-Time Students Fall 2012 with valid Parent Education value.


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