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Dual Credit Expansion Strategies OSPI / WSCA School Counselor Summer Institute June 24 & 25, 2014 Olympia, WA 1.

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Presentation on theme: "Dual Credit Expansion Strategies OSPI / WSCA School Counselor Summer Institute June 24 & 25, 2014 Olympia, WA 1."— Presentation transcript:

1 Dual Credit Expansion Strategies OSPI / WSCA School Counselor Summer Institute June 24 & 25, 2014 Olympia, WA 1

2 Overview Overview and Goals Dual Credit in Washington Expanding Dual Credit Effective Practices Next Steps 2

3 The Washington Student Achievement Council 3 Created by the Legislature in 2012Our Mission: We advance educational opportunities and attainment in Washington. In pursuit of our mission, the Washington Student Achievement Council: Leads statewide strategic planning to improve educational coordination and transitions. Supports Washingtonians through the administration of financial aid, a college savings plan, and support services. Advocates for the economic, social, and civic benefits of postsecondary education. Overview and Goals

4 OSPI 4 Created by the Legislature in 1861Our Mission: Overview and Goals RCW 28A Powers and duties. In addition to any other powers and duties as provided by law, the powers and duties of the superintendent of public instruction shall be: (1) To have supervision over all matters pertaining to the public schools of the state; (2) To report to the governor and the legislature such information and data as may be required for the management and improvement of the Schools; ………………………………………..

5 At least 70% of Washington adults will have a postsecondary credential. All adults in Washington will have a high school diploma or equivalent Attainment Goals 5 Overview and Goals

6 6 Legislation and Policy 2013 – The Ten-Year Roadmap 2013 – Academic acceleration (RCW 28A ) 2012 –Master lists of courses fulfilled by dual credit (RCW 28B ) 2011 – Launch Year (RCW 28A ) 2009 – Dual credit programs — Annual report (RCW 28A ) 1990 – Running Start Program Rules (RCW 28A ) Dual Credit in Washington

7 Current Options Dual Credit/Dual Enrollment 4. Advanced Placement (AP)5. International Baccalaureate (IB)6. Cambridge1. Running Start2. College in the High School3. Tech Prep 7 Dual Credit in Washington

8 Dual Credit Program Participation Student enrollment % change Advanced Placement42,90448, Cambridge College in the High School13,08117, International Baccalaureate Running Start16,85517,527+4 Tech Prep eligible117,270115, Dual Credit in Washington

9 Dual Credit Participation Demographics (Continued) Student enrollment % change 11 th & 12th grade enrollments 194,243191, th through 12th grade enrollments 329,771373, Average # of dual credit courses per year Dual Credit in Washington

10 Dual Credit Participation Demographics (Continued) Student enrollment by ethnicity % change American Indian/Alaska Native Asian13,50215, Black / African American Hispanic / Latino25,33526, White108,487111, Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander Two or more races Ethnicity not Provided Dual Credit in Washington

11 Dual Credit Participation Demographics (Continued) Student enrollment % change Female82,38986, Male83,58287, Special Education12,35512, Bilingual programs Gifted programs619814, Free/Reduced Lunch Eligible60,15266, Dual Credit in Washington

12 Streamline and expand dual-credit opportunities 12 Streamline and expand dual-credit and dual- enrollment programs to create a statewide dual- credit system available to all high school students. Expanding Dual Credit

13 Criteria for a new system Clear information about each option. Low cost to students. Adequate funding to maintain high-quality options. More options, available to more students. Streamline processes for getting college credit. 13 Expanding Dual Credit

14 Faculty Qualifications Full-time and part- time faculty at institutions of higher education, including adjunct faculty, are eligible to teach program courses. College in the high school – Rules RCW 28A (3) (i)RCW 28A (3) (i) College or University Day – Definition WAC WAC Expanding Dual Credit

15 15 AP Potential: Up to 4,000 additional FTE worth of credit could be awarded. Expanding Dual Credit

16 16 RCW 28A (HB 1642) – Dual Credit Capacity Expansion Grantee Strategies Expanding Dual Credit

17 School Planning: Evidence-based Decision Making Utilization of PSAT / AP Potential Success rates in dual credit courses Parent and student needs assessment Readi-Step results Student course selection and grade profiles Analysis of student success in upper level courses 17 Expanding Dual Credit What are your strategies related to making decisions about access?

18 Barrier Reduction Open enrollment policy All AP required to take exam Staff specifically assigned to track student dual credit access and success Partner with CBOs to provide student support Inclusion mode for all students to enroll in dual credit classes Remove gatekeeping practices Address access and support needs for diverse student populations Student self-efficacy building CTE – AP Dual credit advocacy Guidance & counseling program support 18 Expanding Dual Credit What are your strategies related to reducing barriers?

19 Student Support Parent engagement through student-led conference discussions Dual credit orientations in grades 8 and 9 DC alumni speak to parent meetings All hands on deck model of support Guidance and counseling support Collaborations with student support CBOs Tutoring options 19 Expanding Dual Credit What are your strategies related to supporting student access and success to dual credit programming?

20 HB1642 Academic Acceleration workplan goals Increase AP offerings Increase IB offerings Increase CHS offerings Increase RS in high school offerings Explore ways to reduce financial barriers for students/parents Staff training to teach dual credit courses Provide tutoring resources th graders will take college placement exams Students will include dual credit goals as part of their HSBP 20 Expanding Dual Credit

21 HB1642 Academic Acceleration workplan goals (con’t.) Promote college-going culture Outreach to MS students about benefits of dual credit programs Cultural competency staff training Staff PD for dual credit course expansion Alignment of HS courses with CHS offerings Expand Dual credit CTE offerings 21 Expanding Dual Credit What are your goals under consideration for next year?

22 National Standards and Accreditation 17 Standards covering: Curriculum Faculty Students Assessment Program Evaluation 22 Effective Practices

23 National Best Practices – College Campus based Programs The Education Commission of the State recommends 13 State Level Policy Components to Increase Student Access and Success. The Running Start Program aligns with 11 of the 13 policy recommendations.

24 Access Recommendations and Running Start Alignment All eligible students are able to participate. To ensure program access, state law must be unequivocal on this point. Student eligibility requirements are based on the demonstration of ability to access college-level content, not bureaucratic procedures or non-cognitive factors. Caps on the maximum number of courses students may complete are not overly restrictive. Cost should not be a driving factor for states to establish caps. Students earn both secondary and postsecondary credit for successful completion of approved postsecondary courses. While it may sound obvious, such policies are not universal. All students and parents are annually provided with program information. Less-advantaged parents are typically less likely to be aware of dual enrollment opportunities. Counseling is made available to students and parents before and during program participation. State policies should promote the availability of counseling. Effective Practices

25 Access Recommendations and Running Start Alignment continued Responsibility for tuition payments does not fall to parents. Requiring parents to pay tuition up front and receive reimbursement later may preclude participation by some students. Courses meet the same level of rigor as the course taught to traditional students at the partner postsecondary institution. Instructors meet the same expectations as instructors of similar traditional postsecondary courses, and receive appropriate support and evaluation. Districts and institutions publicly report on student participation and outcomes. Only 30 of the 47 states with state-level dual enrollment programs require such reporting. Postsecondary institutions accept dual enrollment credit as transfer credit, provided measures of quality are ensured. More than 20 states require dual enrollment credits to be treated for transfer credit in the same manner as credits earned at the receiving institution.  Programs undergo evaluation based on available data. Nearly 30 states require dual enrollment programs to undergo internal or external evaluation.  Districts and postsecondary institutions are fully funded or reimbursed for participating students. At least one state is tying full funding to course quality. Effective Practices

26 Maine’s High School Aspirations Program: 653 participants Key Similarities: 11 th and 12 th graders are eligible Students are responsible for their transportation, books and food cost Key Differences Admissions policies established by law requiring at least a ‘B’ average. University of Maine: GPA B average, Counselor Recommendation The state pays 50% of the tuition for 3 semester credits Students can take a maximum of 6 credits a year Homeschooled and private school students are typically not eligible How other states are addressing the issue of access Effective Practices

27 Georgia’s Move On When Ready: Established 2009 serving 3,390 students Key Similarities: 11 th and 12 th graders are eligible Admissions policies established by postsecondary institutions School districts must accept credit State pays tuition and fees Students are responsible for their transportation and food cost Key Differences Enrolled students cannot register for high school courses Private and homeschool school students are not eligible Qualified low-income students can qualify for a grant to cover the cost of books Private institutions participate in the dual enrollment program How other states are addressing the issue of access Effective Practices

28 How other states are addressing the issue of access Wisconsin’s Youth Options: 3,600 participants Key Similarities: 11 th and 12 th graders are eligible Admissions policies established by postsecondary institutions Ex: University of Wisconsin Madison GPA 3.00 and exhausted their high school curriculum in the subject School districts must participate State pays tuition and fees Students are responsible for their transportation and food cost Key Differences The school district determines what courses are eligible. Students cannot take courses offered by the high school The school district must pays the cost of tuition, fees, and books Student must pay for post-secondary course comparable to course offered by the high school Transportation assistance is available for low-income students Private and homeschool school students are not eligible Private institutions participate in the dual enrollment program Effective Practices

29 Minnesota’s Postsecondary Enrollment Options: Established 1985; 7,471 participants Key Similarities: 11 th and 12 th graders are eligible Admissions policies established by postsecondary institutions Ex: Rochester Community and Technical College: Juniors 3.0+ GPA, Seniors 2.5+ GPA School districts must participate State pays tuition and fees Students are responsible for their transportation and food cost Key Differences The state pays the cost of books The state covers the cost of consumable supplies for the course Low-income students can qualify for mileage reimbursement State institutions are not allowed to charge mandatory fees or fees for placement test How other states are addressing the issue of access Effective Practices

30 WSAC Dual Credit Workgroup Intended output Recommend policy or legislative language to create a dual enrollment/dual credit system meeting the criteria described in the Roadmap: Provide clear information about each option in ways that empower high school students to choose the option best suited to their goals and schedules. Provide low-cost options for high school students and their families. Ensure adequate funding for high schools and postsecondary institutions to maintain high-quality options. Increase the availability of all options to more high school students. Streamline processes for obtaining postsecondary credit. Intended outcome Increase high school student enrollment in dual credit courses. Increase the amount of college credit awarded to high school students. Increase diversity in the student enrollment in dual credit courses to reflect local demographic 30 Next Steps

31 Continue the Conversation Randy Spaulding, Ph.D. Director of Academic Affairs & Policy Mike Hubert Director, Guidance & Counseling 31 rCollegeReadiness/DualCredit/default.aspx


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