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Application of web-based neuroscience concepts in two settings Kathryn Lovell, PhD; Michigan State University Publication Description Introduction Methods.

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Presentation on theme: "Application of web-based neuroscience concepts in two settings Kathryn Lovell, PhD; Michigan State University Publication Description Introduction Methods."— Presentation transcript:

1 Application of web-based neuroscience concepts in two settings Kathryn Lovell, PhD; Michigan State University Publication Description Introduction Methods Results Summary Points Use of the Neurons website in the Medical Neuroscience course for first year medical students provided a clear, concise review of important neuroscience cellular concepts that many students did not remember from the previous semester, and gave them a good foundation for understanding the additional information presented (e.g. about different types of neurons and neurotransmitters). Use of the Neurons website in the introductory course for post-baccalaureate students provided clear, easily understandable basic concepts for students with no neuroscience or neurophysiology background. Recording of short video tutorials using Creative Commons or public domain images from various sources gave students in the first year Medical Neuroscience course the opportunity to preview laboratory objectives and see 3-dimensional aspects of structures. These were used, on a supplemental basis, by over half of the students in the course (data from log-ins recorded in ANGEL, the course management system). Over one-fourth of students using the videos accessed the same resource more than once. The online tutorials were available in several formats; for one topic the breakdown of format access was 67% streaming video, 20% downloadable file, 13% m4v (for iPod, etc.) Comments included the following: The videos were a big help. I was having trouble putting everything together 3-D and they helped me to picture it. The material was fantastic. It really helped me to figure out the 3-D orientation of the objectives. The online tutorial, Neurons: Animated Cellular and Molecular Concepts, has been used in two classes in the Michigan State University College of Human Medicine (MSU-CHM) and College of Osteopathic Medicine (MSU-COM) to introduce basic concepts and/or to help students review concepts learned in a previous course. One class was a first year medical student course, Medical Neuroscience, taught for over 500 students in both colleges. Students reviewed prerequisite concepts in neurohistology and cellular mechanisms covered in the previous semester, as well as learning more advanced concepts. The second class, Introduction to Human Neuroscience, was for post-baccalaureate students in the MSU-CHM Advanced Baccalaureate Learning Program to prepare them to take the Medical Neuroscience course in spring semester with medical students. “This simple web-based tutorial was designed for students who have no background in neuroscience and who are struggling with basic concepts. It is intended to be used early in a course to bring such students up to the level of the remainder of the class. Basic events in neuronal function, e.g. establishment of the resting membrane potential, action potentials, neurotransmitter release, post-synaptic mechanisms and axonal transport, are explained using minimal text and interactive, two-dimensional animations. The interface is set up as a small booklet of eight chapters, each addressing one aspect of neuronal function.” (Stewart P, Wilson-Pauwels L, Cameron T, Neurons: Animated Cellular and Molecular Concepts. MedEdPORTAL; 2006; For the Medical Neuroscience course, images from the tutorial were used in an online lecture (left: powerpoint example), and a recommendation was made that students utilize the website and animations to fully review neuronal cell biology and synaptic transmission concepts. In addition, multiple images were utilized in short video recordings to explain laboratory objectives, help students understand the 3- dimensional perspectives of the CNS, and correlate with the required class digital atlas developed by Dr. J.I. Johnson. (http://learn.chm.msu.edu/NeuroEd/NOP552/index.html)  Open educational resources such as the Neurons website can be adapted for use in different ways for different audiences.  Interactive diagrams and animations, along with explanations, can be powerful learning tools to help students with variable backgrounds and learning styles master difficult concepts.  Web-based tutorials are effective instructional tools that can be utilized by students when needed and when appropriate.  Open educational resources (such as Creative Commons license) can be combined in unique and effective ways to meet the background of the learner, the objectives of the course, and to correlate with other required or recommended class materials. Affiliation: MSU College of Human Medicine (CHM) and College of Osteopathic Medicine (COM); Dept. Neurology & Ophthalmology; College of Human Medicine Dean’s Office; Dept. Radiology/Division of Anatomy. Travel funding provided by CHM Dean’s Office and Dept. Radiology. Table of Contents for “Neurons” website UCLA Histology Collection; CC PA Stewart, Functional Neuroanatomy note: boundary between CNS and PNS; change from oligodendrocytes to Schwann cells forming myelin CNS PNS Lower motor neurons For the post-baccalaureate students, many images from the website were used in the powerpoint slides for the live lectures, both cell biology topics and examples of other concepts, such as lower motor neurons (right). Some of the animations were shown in class. Specific chapters from the website were assigned for students as part of learning objectives. Example: overview in “Anatomy of a Neuron” chapter, introducing concepts of neurons and glia. Examples from “Neurotransmitter Release” and “Postsynaptic Mechanisms” chapters. Animations illustrate each step in synaptic transmission. Images from multiple sources with Creative Commons license were combined to illustrate concepts and perspectives related to the fourth ventricle. Narration and further annotation explained the concepts. Diagrams showing different perspectives were used to describe components of cranial nerves and show the correlation to nuclei (indicated below) in the class digital atlas (image from Yakovlev Haleem collection). P. Stewart, Neurons website


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