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MAPPING PATHWAYS TO COLLEGE AND CAREER SUCCESS PRESENTED BY KAREN L. ALEXANDER, PH.D. ACHIEVETEXAS PROJECT COORDINATOR 4/24/2015.

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Presentation on theme: "MAPPING PATHWAYS TO COLLEGE AND CAREER SUCCESS PRESENTED BY KAREN L. ALEXANDER, PH.D. ACHIEVETEXAS PROJECT COORDINATOR 4/24/2015."— Presentation transcript:

1 MAPPING PATHWAYS TO COLLEGE AND CAREER SUCCESS PRESENTED BY KAREN L. ALEXANDER, PH.D. ACHIEVETEXAS PROJECT COORDINATOR 4/24/2015

2 The materials are copyrighted © and trademarked ™ as the property of the Texas Education Agency (TEA) and may not be reproduced without the express written permission of TEA, except under the following conditions:  Texas public school districts, charter schools, and Education Service Centers may reproduce and use copies of the Materials and Related Materials for the districts’ and schools’ educational use without obtaining permission from TEA.  Residents of the state of Texas may reproduce and use copies of the Materials and Related Materials for individual personal use only without obtaining written permission of TEA.  Any portion reproduced must be reproduced in its entirety and remain unedited, unaltered and unchanged in any way.  No monetary charge can be made for the reproduced materials or any document containing them; however, a reasonable charge to cover only the cost of reproduction and distribution may be charged.  Private entities or persons located in Texas that are not Texas public school districts, Texas Education Service Centers, or Texas charter schools or any entity, whether public or private, educational or non-educational, located outside the state of Texas MUST obtain written approval from TEA and will be required to enter into a license agreement that may involve the payment of a licensing fee or a royalty.  For information contact: Office of Intellectual Property, Texas Education Agency, Room 2-186, 1701 N. Congress Ave., Austin, TX ; phone or ; 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT © 2013, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 2 COPYRIGHT © NOTICE

3 A NEED IN TEXAS What makes a student college and career ready? How are today’s students different than students of the past? What are some of the challenges of this new population? With permission from © 2013 Texas College & Career Readiness Center 3

4 OUR MANY CHALLENGES… A high dropout rate of secondary students Students who graduate are lacking in basic math and science skills Most students think they are going to college but do not prepare for it or any other possible future Extraordinarily high remediation rates for two-year college applicants 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT © 2013, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 4

5 TRUE OR FALSE Texas leads the nation in students entering college. 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT © 2013, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 5

6 OF TH GRADERS, HOW MANY… © 2013 TEXAS COLLEGE & CAREER READINESS CENTER 6 Source: NCES – Common Core Data, IPEDS Residency and Migration Survey, IPEDS Enrollment Survey, IPEDS Graduation Rate Survey (2008) With permission from © 2013 Texas College & Career Readiness Center

7 TRUE OR FALSE The fastest growth will occur in jobs requiring a bachelor’s degree. 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT © 2013, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 7

8 Half of all new jobs in the U.S. will require postsecondary degree. Fastest growth will occur in jobs requiring an associate’s degree. 1/3 of all job openings in the U.S. will require a postsecondary degree. 80% of the top 20 growth occupations in Texas will require education above the high school level. Occupations ECONOMIC REALITIES 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT © 2013, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 8

9 PERCENTAGE OF ADULTS WITH AN ASSOCIATES DEGREE OR HIGHER BY AGE Sources: Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development. (2009). Education at a glance. US Census Bureau. (2009). American community survey. WORLD: ■ ▲ TEXAS: ■ ▲ © 2013 TEXAS COLLEGE & CAREER READINESS CENTER 9 With permission from © 2013 Texas College & Career Readiness Center

10 TRUE OR FALSE AchieveTexas College and Career Initiative is the name for career clusters in Texas. 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT © 2013, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 10

11 Created around career clusters Improve learner achievement – both academic and technical Promote successful transitions from secondary to postsecondary education Support workforce and economic development 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT © 2013, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 11 ACHIEVETEXAS COLLEGE AND CAREER INITIATIVE

12 ACHIEVETEXAS SUPPORTS ALL 16 CAREER CLUSTERS 4/24/ COPYRIGHT © 2013, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY

13 TRUE OR FALSE AchieveTexas is an initiative for CTE students only. 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT © 2013, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 13

14 TRUE OR FALSE Some careers are better than others. 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT © 2013, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 14

15 Concept - Students can succeed in school, career, and life if they plan their own individual college and career success. Philosophy - No career option is intrinsically better than the other. Whether the choice is right or not depends on the personal goals of the student. Goal - To prepare students for college and career, and allow them to choose the options that are best for them. 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT © 2013, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 15 ACHIEVETEXAS IS BASED UPON…

16 Work for students to support their career goals Initiate early career awareness Expose students to all available career opportunities through career exploration Help students transition successfully to postsecondary education and career ACHIEVETEXAS IS DESIGNED TO… 4/24/ COPYRIGHT © 2013, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY

17 TRUE OR FALSE AchieveTexas spans all grades. 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT © 2013, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 17

18 CAREER DEVELOPMENT SPANS ALL GRADES K-5: Understanding the Importance and Value of Work and Jobs Introduction to the world of careers 6-8: Initial Career Exploration Discovering interest areas Grade 8: Career Exploration and Transition Develop graduation plans based upon personal interest/cluster areas 9-12: Programs of Study Related to a Career Goal Academics and technical courses, intensive guidance, individual graduation plans Postsecondary: Career Preparation Achieving credentials: college, certification, apprenticeship, military Employment: Career Advancement Continuing Education and Lifelong Learning Steps to Success

19 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT © 2013, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 19 EIGHT STEPS FOR SYSTEM BUILDING 1. Decide to implement AchieveTexas 2. Span all grades 3. Add Programs of Study for all students 4. Enhance guidance and counseling 5. Build seamless connections 6. Establish extended learning 7. Build strong partnerships 8. Support intense professional development

20 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT© TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 20 IMPLEMENTATION RESOURCES

21 QUESTIONS?

22 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT © 2013, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY COLLEGE AND CAREER READINESS 22

23 TRUE OR FALSE There is a difference between readiness for college and eligibility for college. 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT © 2013, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 23

24 READINESS VS. ELIGIBILITY Readiness and eligibility are two different goals More students are going to college than ever before and this trend is likely to continue Two-year colleges have seen a noticeable enrollment increase 24 With permission from © 2013 Texas College & Career Readiness Center

25 TEXAS STATEWIDE POSTSECONDARY ENROLLMENT BY INSTITUTION ( ) Source: THECB. (2011). Texas higher education: Statewide longitudinal enrollment. *Headcount only includes students enrolled in credit-bearing classes © 2013 TEXAS COLLEGE & CAREER READINESS CENTER 25

26 Four Dimensions of CCR Seven Principles of CCR the-book DAVID T. CONLEY 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT© TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 26

27 David T. Conley, 2010 The level of preparation a student needs in order to enroll and succeed—without remediation—in a credit- bearing course at a postsecondary institution that offers a baccalaureate degree or transfer to a baccalaureate program, or in a high-quality certificate program that enables students to enter a career pathway with potential future advancement. COLLEGE AND CAREER READY 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT© TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 27

28 TRUE OR FALSE College ready is the same as career ready. 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT © 2013, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 28

29 ACTE DEFINES CAREER READY 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT© TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 29

30 CONSIDER THIS DATA… Source: Texas HS Snapshot College Readiness Survey Summary data with 19, 505 students and 37 different high schools represented. © 2013 TEXAS COLLEGE & CAREER READINESS CENTER 30

31 CONSIDER THIS DATA… © 2013 TEXAS COLLEGE & CAREER READINESS CENTER 31

32 Key Cognitive Strategies Problem formulation, research, interpretation, communication, precision and accuracy Key Content Knowledge Key foundational content and “big ideas” from core subjects Academic Behaviors Self-management skills: time management, study skills, goal setting, self-awareness, persistence Transitions Admissions requirements, college types and missions, affording college, college culture, relationships with professors FOUR DIMENSIONS OF CCR (STUDENT) 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT© TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 32

33 1.Create and Maintain a College and Career Going Culture 2.Create a Core Academic Program Aligned with College Readiness Standards 3.Teach Key Self-Management Skills and Academic Behaviors and Expect Students to Use Them 4.Make College and Career Real 5.Create Assignments and Grading Policies that More Closely Approximate College Expectations 6.Make the Senior Year Meaningful and Challenging 7.Build Partnerships and Connections to Postsecondary Programs SEVEN PRINCIPLES OF CCR (DISTRICT) 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT© TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 33

34 ACHIEVETEXAS PROMOTES CCRS Goal is readiness for college and career. CTE courses integrate academic standards and career preparation skills in a way that the standards and skills can be applied to the real world. CTE courses (TEKS) were revised to include CCRS—academic and cross-disciplinary. Cross walking the CTE TEKS and CCRS. 4/24/ COPYRIGHT © 2013, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY

35 TRUE OR FALSE AchieveTexas College and Career Planning Guides promote the dimensions of college readiness. 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT © 2013, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 35

36 Academic Behaviors? Contextual Skills and Awareness?  College and Career Planning Guides 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT© TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 36 WHAT ARE YOU DOING WITH…

37 QUESTIONS?

38 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT © 2013, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 38 PROGRAM OF STUDY MODEL COMPONENTS

39 Programs of study can be the centerpiece of the guidance program. Programs of study help students plan an individualized coherent educational path. WHY PROGRAMS OF STUDY? 4/24/ COPYRIGHT©2013 TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY

40 TRUE OR FALSE Conley supports the concept of programs of study. 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT © 2013, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 40

41 ACCORDING TO CONLEY, P. 21 Schools need to, “create an intellectually coherent program of study that is systematically designed to focus on…the “big ideas” of each subject area taught.” “Key cognitive strategies should be developed over a sequentially more challenging progression throughout four years of high school.” “If the content of the program of study is carefully organized around the kinds of key organizing and supporting concepts and information described previously, this structure of challenging and appropriate content can be used as a framework for developing key thinking and reasoning skills and other supporting cognitive habits that will affect success in college.” 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT © 2013, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 41

42 TRUE OR FALSE Programs of Study address all levels of education. 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT © 2013, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 42

43 PROGRAMS OF STUDY IN TEXAS 122 models are available at Models illustrate various career goals in all 16 career clusters Components: Middle school connection Requirements for the Recommended High School Graduation Plan Secondary certifications Extended learning opportunities, including CTSOs College credit opportunities Postsecondary linkages Career opportunities from entry level to advanced Professional associations Recent revisions include more postsecondary detail 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT © 2013, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 43

44 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT © 2013, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 44 Specific POS career goal is listed first. Related career goals are listed with the assigned O*NET Code. Hyperlinked to the specific occupation as described in the Occupational Outlook Handbook, Edition.

45 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT © 2013, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 45 Districts can list courses offered for high school credit at the 8 th grade, such as Algebra I.

46 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT © 2013, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 46 Core Courses reflect changes resulting from Texas House Bill 3 (2009). Career- Related Electives reflect approved CTE courses resulting from the TEKS revision process. All POS are based upon the Recommended High School Graduation Program and can be adapted for the Distinguished Achievement Program (DAP).

47 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT © 2013, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 47 Career and Technical Student Organizations (CTSOs) have hyperlinks to take students to the organizations’ website. CTSOs are curricular organizations supporting the related CTE courses.

48 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT © 2013, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 48 Districts may customize this section by listing all of the college credit opportunities available on the local level while students are enrolled in high school.

49 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT © 2013, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 49 Examples are provide of on-the-job training and certifications that are available at the secondary level.

50 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT © 2013, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 50 Postsecondary section is hyperlinked to additional pages providing more details about programs. Sample career options are provided with each degree level. Occupations reflect entry- level through professional-level positions that require advanced degrees.

51 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT © 2013, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 51 Details are provided on specific coursework available with the Associate’s Degree related to the specific career goal as well as the available licenses and certifications.

52 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT © 2013, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 52 Postsecondary programs can be researched through these two websites.

53 CTE must have POS that… Align rigorous academic standards and student achievement standards; Include Academic and CTE content in a coordinated, non- duplicative progression of courses; Are relevant and challenging at the secondary and postsecondary level; Lead to employment in high skill, high wage, or high demand occupations; Offer opportunities for dual credit; and Lead to a degree, certificate, or credential. IMPLEMENTATION OF PROGRAMS OF STUDY 4/24/ COPYRIGHT©2013 TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY

54 RESEARCH INDICATES… “The process of creating individual learning plans…helps engage students in their own development, a critical component in their success.” Chait, R., Muller, R.D., Goldware, S., & Housman, N.G. (2007). Academic interventions to help students meet rigorous standards: State policy options. Washington, DC: Institute for Educational Leadership. 4/24/ COPYRIGHT©2013 TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY

55 TRUE OR FALSE All 16 Career Clusters™ must be implemented in local districts. 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT © 2013, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 55

56 Local districts choose which career clusters to implement based on the needs of the students, community, and local economy. Not all schools will be able to offer all 16 clusters. Goal is to use advanced technology to give students a sample of each career cluster and enhance their opportunities for high-demand, high-skill, or high-wage occupations. ALL 16 CLUSTERS IN EVERY SCHOOL? 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT©2013 TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 56

57 TAC§74.3 Description of a Required Secondary Curriculum states that a district must provide career and technical education courses selected from at least three of the eight (sixteen) career and technical areas (clusters) taught on a campus in the school district with provisions for contracting for additional offerings with programs or institutions as may be practical. Perkins grant requirement—at least one POS in each of the three locally selected clusters. MINIMUM REQUIREMENT 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT©2013 TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 57

58 Districts should set a goal for implementation based on recommendations from their local advisory committee or board. Eight Steps in the Implementation Guide are recommendations for local implementation. 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT©2013 TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 58 IMPLEMENTATION RECOMMENDATIONS

59 Former CTE Program Names Family & Consumer Sciences Agricultural Sciences Business Education Career Clusters™ Education and Training Human Services Hospitality & Tourism Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources Business Management & Administration Finance Information Technology GO BEYOND THE MINIMUM! 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT©2013 TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 59

60 COHERENT SEQUENCE OF CTE COURSES Two or more CTE courses for three or more credits Locally defined Courses can be from multiple clusters 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT © 2013, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 60

61 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT©2009 TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 61 These courses could be added to a POS in Health Sciences

62 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT©2013 TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 62 ACHIEVETEXAS RESOURCES Counselor Guide and Counselor Kits

63 TRUE OR FALSE State and Federal CTE funds can be used to enhance local career guidance services. 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT © 2013, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 63

64 Perkins IV defines as… providing access for students (and parents, as appropriate) to information regarding career awareness and planning with respect to an individual’s occupational and academic future; and providing information with respect to career options, financial aid, and postsecondary options, including baccalaureate degree programs. 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT©2013 TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 64 CAREER GUIDANCE AND ACADEMIC COUNSELING

65 STUDENTS WHO RECEIVED CAREER COUNSELING SERVICES WHILE IN HIGH SCHOOL (GYSBERS, 2008) Had slightly higher high school academic records. Were more satisfied with their high school experiences. Were more consistent with their career choices and remained longer in their chosen areas after high school. Made more progress in their chosen areas of employment. 4/24/ COPYRIGHT©2013 TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY

66 Were more likely to enter postsecondary education and then graduate. Were more satisfied with their post-secondary education. Reported greater satisfaction with their lives five years out of high school. Expressed more positive attitudes about the counseling they received while in high school. 4/24/ COPYRIGHT©2013 TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY Gysbers, N. (June 2008). College and Career Readiness for All Students: A Major Goal of Comprehensive School Counseling Programs. 9 th Annual Transforming School Counseling Academy.

67 TRUE OR FALSE AchieveTexas supports counselor mandates. 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT © 2013, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 67

68 Meets TEC § —Personal Graduation Plans (PGPs) Meets TEC §33.007—Counseling Public School Students Regarding Higher Education Supports TEC §33.005—Model Comprehensive, Developmental Guidance, and Counseling Program 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT©2013 TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 68 BENEFITS FOR COUNSELORS

69 Four core components form the foundation: 1.A guidance curriculum 2.A responsive services component 3.An individual planning system 4.System support 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT©2013 TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 69 COMPREHENSIVE, DEVELOPMENTAL GUIDANCE, AND COUNSELING PROGRAM

70 PARTING THOUGHT 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT © 2013, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 70 TEA data show that students who take two or more CTE courses have a significantly lower dropout rate and higher scores on state assessments.

71 WITH ACHIEVETEXAS… We can build a college and career ready culture. We can better inform parents of opportunities for their students. We have an opportunity to impact ALL students. We can improve the coordination between core and career-related electives. ALL students will benefit from a focus on academic and technical skills. ALL students can focus their future. 4/24/ COPYRIGHT © 2013, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY

72 QUESTIONS?

73 FOR MORE INFORMATION Visit these websites Dr. Karen Alexander at or Cindy Miller 4/24/2015 COPYRIGHT © 2013, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY 73


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