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Policy Directions for Career and Technical Education Hans K. Meeder, Deputy Assistant Secretary Office of Vocational and Adult Education United States.

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Presentation on theme: "Policy Directions for Career and Technical Education Hans K. Meeder, Deputy Assistant Secretary Office of Vocational and Adult Education United States."— Presentation transcript:

1 Policy Directions for Career and Technical Education Hans K. Meeder, Deputy Assistant Secretary Office of Vocational and Adult Education United States Department of Education October 2003

2 Economic Change Education Challenges Key Policy Objectives Topics for Discussion

3 Fastest Growing Jobs Require Some Education Beyond High School

4 High Learning = High Earning SALARYSALARY

5 U.S. Workforce Skill Level Changes Professional 20% Skilled 20% Unskilled 60% Professional 20% Unskilled 15% Skilled 65% National Summit on 21 st Century Skills for 21 st Century Jobs

6 Small Businesses Seek 20th Century Skills for 21st Century Workforce 1,000 respondents placed high value on Verbal & written communications Math Computer expertise Interpersonal skills Only one-third satisfied with pool of available applicants Second national “Voice from the Street” survey conducted for American Express Small Business Services

7 Changing Times “…many companies are firing and hiring at the same time, dumping outmoded or redundant employees and adding new ones with very different skills. Allstate Corp. is doing it. Pricewaterhouse- Coopers LLP is doing it. So are BellSouth Corp., Adobe Systems Inc. and a mess of others.” – The Wall Street Journal March 13, 2000

8 High schools have not changed enough – “soft bigotry of low expectations.” Disconnect between student aspirations and actual high school preparation. High rates of college remediation needed High rates of college “drift out” High schools do not pair college prep and career awareness/training for students. Educational Need for Change

9 Reading performance of 17-year-olds Source: NCES. NAEP 1999, Trends in Academic Performance: Three Decades of Student Performance, p. 9.

10 College “drift-out” rates Students not returning for year 2 4-year colleges 26% 2-year colleges 45% Source: Mortensen, T. (November 1999), Postsecondary Opportunity as presented by The Education Trust.

11 Educational Need for Change Research consistently shows that rigorous academic course-taking increases student achievement, particularly for students most at risk of school failure.

12 Advanced Math & Science Increases At-Risk Students’ Postsecondary Enrollment At-Risk Students Enrolling in Post- secondary Source: NCES, The Condition of Education, p. 51.

13 The Prep to Performance Link The strongest predictor of college completion is a rigorous and challenging high school course of study. Most significantly, the higher the level of mathematics completed in secondary school, the stronger the continuing influence on bachelor’s degree completion. Completion of two experimental (lab) science courses is the second most significant factor in determining whether or not students will complete college. Answers in the Tool Box by Clifford Adelman, June 1999

14 Disconnect Between Student Aspirations and High School Preparation Students Source: NCES, The Condition of Education, 2000, p. 151.

15 Educational Need for Change In many cases, vocational education has not demonstrated a clear impact on: Academic achievement Academic achievement High school completion High school completion Postsecondary transitions Postsecondary transitions But, integrated courses of study with technical AND academic classes do show positive results for student performance

16 Academic Achievement For Students Taking Different Courses of Study Source: NCES, Trends in High School Vocational/Technical Coursetaking: 1982 – 1998, January 2002

17 Policy Challenges All youth need a high level of core academic skills, regardless of their chosen educational and career path. Many high schools and traditional voc-ed programs are not currently designed to meet this objective. Many high schools and traditional voc-ed programs are not currently designed to meet this objective. Millions of adults currently in the workforce also need to strengthen and acquire new academic and technical skills. Connections among high schools, postsecondary options and employers must be strengthened.

18 The Bush Administration’s Key Education Principles Increase accountability for student performance Focus on what works Reduce bureaucracy and increase flexibility Choices for students and parents

19 Key Policy Objectives for Career and Technical Education Ensure that career and technical education programs complement the academic mission of No Child Left Behind. Help all youth in CTE Pathway Programs receive a challenging academic core that prepares them for future education and career success.

20 Key Policy Objectives for Career and Technical Education Ensure that every CTE program offers a clear pathway into a postsecondary program leading to a credential, apprenticeship, associate or baccalaureate degree. Make high-quality CTE pathway programs widely available to both youth and career- changing adults through a variety of institutions and delivery models. Strengthen national and regional workforce quality and economic competitiveness.

21 Program Overview The Administration proposes the SecTech program, synthesizing the best of Perkins State Grants and Tech Prep. States will use Perkins formula allocations to provide funding to partnerships among secondary schools and postsecondary organizations, including community and technical colleges, higher education and apprenticeship programs.

22 Key Strategies CTE Pathway Programs Partnerships between High Schools and Postsecondary Partners Partnerships between High Schools and Postsecondary Partners Challenging Academic Core Challenging Academic Core Non-duplicative technical courses leading to degree, certification or apprenticeship Non-duplicative technical courses leading to degree, certification or apprenticeship Career pathways that are in-demand and lead to economic self-sufficiency Career pathways that are in-demand and lead to economic self-sufficiency Flexible delivery models that focus on “what” not “where” Flexible delivery models that focus on “what” not “where”

23 The State Role Create close coordination between secondary and postsecondary agencies to manage funds and program requirements. Identify Challenging Academic Core classes as the minimum for all CTE pathway programs. Develop and recognize series of CTE Pathway Programs. Set criteria for funding to the local high schools and postsecondary institutions offering connected CTE Pathway Programs.

24 Benefits for Students Expands choices tailored to individual interests. Ensures enrollment in core academic classes needed to open up postsecondary options. Enables student to obtain college credits while still in high school. Provides exposure to integrated career and college planning services. Eases transition into and through college-level programs.

25 Strengthens academic performance of all students, eliminates low-level tracking. Positions career technical education as a key strategy in high school improvement. Creates stronger linkages to postsecondary education, training and employment. Benefits for High School Educators & Leaders

26 Provides better prepared youth entrants who will need less remediation. Strengthens student retention and completion. Creates more compelling value to employer program partners. Creates closer connections between baccalaureate programs and community college pathway programs. Benefits for Community & Technical Colleges

27 Expands validated programs that teach skills that are in-demand in the marketplace. Allows employers to work with colleges and high schools through unified partnerships around CTE Pathway Programs. Connects local programs to industry-based and nationally-recognized skill standards. Improves potential for working connections to the state workforce investment system. Benefits for Employers

28 Key Policy Objectives for Career and Technical Education Ensure that career technical education programs complement the academic mission of No Child Left Behind. Help all youth in CTE Pathway Programs receive a challenging academic core that prepares them for future education and career success.

29 Key Policy Objectives for Career and Technical Education Ensure that every CTE program offers a clear pathway into a postsecondary program leading to a credential, apprenticeship, associate or baccalaureate degree. Make high-quality CTE pathway programs widely available to both youth and career- changing adults through a variety of institutions and delivery models. Strengthen national and regional workforce quality and economic competitiveness.

30 Policy Directions for Career and Technical Education Hans K. Meeder Send questions and comments to: Updated 11/13/2003


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