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The Topic: The Topic: “Welcome to the Palace of Westminster”

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Presentation on theme: "The Topic: The Topic: “Welcome to the Palace of Westminster”"— Presentation transcript:

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2 The Topic: The Topic: “Welcome to the Palace of Westminster”

3 It’s also called the Houses of Parliament.

4 Vocabulary Lord Chancellor – лорд-канцлер Lord Chancellor – лорд-канцлер Labour Party – партия лейбористов Labour Party – партия лейбористов Conservative Party – партия консерваторов Conservative Party – партия консерваторов Speaker - спикер Speaker - спикер to preside - председательствовать to preside - председательствовать to debate - обсуждать to debate - обсуждать chamber - палата chamber - палата David Lloyd George - Дэвид Ллойд Джордж David Lloyd George - Дэвид Ллойд Джордж Winston Churchill - Уинстон Черчилль Winston Churchill - Уинстон Черчилль

5 Vocabulary Lord Chancellor Lord Chancellor Labour Party Labour Party Conservative Party Conservative Party Speaker Speaker to preside to preside to debate to debate Chamber Chamber David Lloyd George David Lloyd George Winston Churchill Winston Churchill

6 Vocabulary лорд-канцлер лорд-канцлер партия лейбористов партия лейбористов партия консерваторов партия консерваторов спикер спикер председательствовать председательствовать обсуждать обсуждать палата палата Дэвид Ллойд Джордж Дэвид Ллойд Джордж Уинстон Черчилль Уинстон Черчилль

7 It consists of three parts: It consists of three parts: the Royal Apartments (gold), the Royal Apartments (gold), the House of Lords (red) and the House of Lords (red) and the House of Commons (green). the House of Commons (green).

8 We are now in the Chamber of the House of Lords, where the seats are red.

9 The House of Lords It is also called the Parliament Chamber, because every year when the Queen comes to open Parliament, all three parts of Parliament come together here for the Queen’s Speech. It is also called the Parliament Chamber, because every year when the Queen comes to open Parliament, all three parts of Parliament come together here for the Queen’s Speech.

10 In fact, it’s not really the Queen’s Speech, because she doesn’t write it. The Government writes it for her. In the speech the Queen tells Parliament about the Government’s plans for the next year.

11 The Throne. When the Queen gives her speech, she sits on the throne. It is behind the big red cushion. When the Queen gives her speech, she sits on the throne. It is behind the big red cushion.

12 The Woolsack. It is the big red cushion. There is wool inside it. It’s a part of a very old tradition which started in the 14 th century. It symbolized the importance of wool to the British economy at that time. It is the big red cushion. There is wool inside it. It’s a part of a very old tradition which started in the 14 th century. It symbolized the importance of wool to the British economy at that time.

13 The person who usually sits on the Woolsack is the Lord Chancellor. He presides over the House of Lords.

14 Let’s walk through this arch. There are two statues, one on each side of the arch. One is Sir Winston Churchill, and the other - David Lloyd George. They were Prime Ministers. They represent two British main political parties – the Conservative Party and the Labour Party. Let’s walk through this arch. There are two statues, one on each side of the arch. One is Sir Winston Churchill, and the other - David Lloyd George. They were Prime Ministers. They represent two British main political parties – the Conservative Party and the Labour Party.

15 Now we are in the House of Commons where the seats are green. The chamber here isn’t very big. There are only places for 437 people on the benches, but there are 650 MPs, so sometimes they have to sit on the steps.

16 The Speaker is the person who presides over the House of Commons.

17 The distance between these two red lines is two swords’ lengths. In the old days when MPs used to carry swords, it was dangerous if they got angry with each other. So these two lines are here to remind MPs that they shouldn’t start a fight, and they can’t go over this line when they are speaking in a debate. The distance between these two red lines is two swords’ lengths. In the old days when MPs used to carry swords, it was dangerous if they got angry with each other. So these two lines are here to remind MPs that they shouldn’t start a fight, and they can’t go over this line when they are speaking in a debate. In the House of Commons.

18 The Mace. The Mace is put on the table when the House of Commons is sitting. It is the symbol of the power which Parliament won from the King a long time ago. The Mace is put on the table when the House of Commons is sitting. It is the symbol of the power which Parliament won from the King a long time ago.

19 In the House of Commons There are two long narrow corridors here. MPs come here to vote on bills for new laws. On the left there is the «yes» lobby. MPs who agree with a bill go there. On the right there is the «no»lobby. There are two long narrow corridors here. MPs come here to vote on bills for new laws. On the left there is the «yes» lobby. MPs who agree with a bill go there. On the right there is the «no»lobby.

20 The Westminster Hall This is the oldest part of the Palace of Westminster. The walls were built in This is the oldest part of the Palace of Westminster. The walls were built in 1097.

21 Match parts of the sentences from box A and box B using the words where, who, which, that. Box A Box A 1. This is the throne…. the thronethe throne 2. This is the Lord Chancellor…. the Lord Chancellor….the Lord Chancellor…. 3. This is the Chamber of the House of Commons…. the Chamber of the House of Commonsthe Chamber of the House of Commons 4. This is the Speaker… the Speakerthe Speaker 5. This is the Woolsack… the Woolsackthe Woolsack 6. This is the Chamber of the House of Lords…. 7. This is the Mace… the Macethe Mace 8. This is the Westminster Hall the Westminster Hallthe Westminster Hall Box B Box B 1. …is the symbol of power. 2. …is the oldest part of the building. 3. …the Lords and Ladies sit. 4. …MPs sit. 5. …sits on the Woolsack. 6. …presides over the House of Commons. 7. …is full of wool. 8. …the Queen sits when she opens the Parliament.

22 Murtaza G. Rakhimov is our democratically-elected president.

23 The State Assembly or the Kurultai is the legislative (lawmaking) government body.

24 Let’s sum up our lesson 1. How many parts does the Palace of Westminster consist of? a) one b) two c) three a) one b) two c) threeone two threeone two three 2. What are the main colours of the Houses of Parliament? a) gold, red and blue a) gold, red and bluegold, red and bluegold, red and blue b) gold, green and red b) gold, green and redgold, green and redgold, green and red c) red and green c) red and greenred and greenred and green 3. Who writes the Queen’s Speech? a) the Queen b) the Government a) the Queen b) the Governmentthe Queenthe Governmentthe Queenthe Government c) the Lord Chancellor c) the Lord Chancellorthe Lord Chancellorthe Lord Chancellor

25 4. Which are Britain’s two main political parties? a)Democratic, Republican and Conservative b) Conservative and Democratic c) Labour and Conservative a)Democratic, Republican and Conservative b) Conservative and Democratic c) Labour and ConservativeDemocratic, Republican and Conservative and DemocraticLabour and ConservativeDemocratic, Republican and Conservative and DemocraticLabour and Conservative 5. Whose shoe should a Conservative touch? a) David Lloyd George’s b) Winston Churchill’s c) the Queen’s a) David Lloyd George’s b) Winston Churchill’s c) the Queen’sDavid Lloyd George’sWinston Churchill’sthe Queen’sDavid Lloyd George’sWinston Churchill’sthe Queen’s 6. When can you see the Mace in the House of Commons? a) It’s always there. a) It’s always there.It’s always thereIt’s always there b) Only when the Queen comes. b) Only when the Queen comes.Only when the Queen comes.Only when the Queen comes. c) When the House is debating. c) When the House is debating.When the House is debating.When the House is debating.

26 7. Why do MPs sometimes sit on the steps? a) There are more MPs than seats in the House of Commons. b) It’s a part of an old tradition. c) It’s a punishment for those who are late. a) There are more MPs than seats in the House of Commons. b) It’s a part of an old tradition. c) It’s a punishment for those who are late.There are more MPs than seats in the House of Commons.It’s a part of an old traditionIt’s a punishment for those who are late.There are more MPs than seats in the House of Commons.It’s a part of an old traditionIt’s a punishment for those who are late. 8. How old is Westminster Hall? a) more than a thousand years old b) more than a hundred years old c) more than four hundred years old. a) more than a thousand years old b) more than a hundred years old c) more than four hundred years old.more than a thousand years oldmore than a hundred years oldmore than four hundred years old.more than a thousand years oldmore than a hundred years oldmore than four hundred years old.

27 Well done! You are right!

28 Sorry. You are wrong!

29 Homework: Exercise C, page 60


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