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Helping Teacher Candidates Envision the Common Core Conference on Emerging Evidence and Promising Practices June 18, 2014.

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Presentation on theme: "Helping Teacher Candidates Envision the Common Core Conference on Emerging Evidence and Promising Practices June 18, 2014."— Presentation transcript:

1 Helping Teacher Candidates Envision the Common Core Conference on Emerging Evidence and Promising Practices June 18, 2014

2 What’s Expeditionary Learning? A non-profit network of practitioners with a 20+ year history of providing professional development to teachers and school leaders. We are proud of our work in and with NYS partners. For teachers by teachers – we’ve engaged teams of teachers from high-performing classrooms across the state to help develop our videos, curriculum modules, and books, all describing the Common Core in action and many of which are free and available online. 2

3 How We Got Smart About the Common Core In partnership with the New York State Education Department, tackled a huge project to bring the Common Core to life for New York’s teachers and leaders (EngageNY and the Network Teams Institutes). Advised and sharpened by Student Achievement Partners (SAP), the authors of the Common Core. Nearly 2 million downloads of the curriculum – suggests that teachers across the country are hungry for specific guidance and models of teaching in the Common Core era.

4 Notes from the Field The CCLS are excellent – and they don’t tell the whole story. The “Shifts” are where the real changes lie. The “Shifts” represent a sea change in literacy education. Everyone has to learn new ways of teaching literacy.

5 Let’s watch Common Core in Action Focus on what’s different in this teacher’s practice than what you may have guided teacher candidates toward in the past.

6 The Shifts

7 Our Website –

8 Our Curriculum Is built on the PARCC framework. Nationally recognized for level of engagement and rigorous and consistent alignment to standards (it’s fun AND technically sound). Named among the “highest-quality Common Core-aligned curriculum materials currently available.” Is a model for your students. 8

9 Our Design Approach 9 The curriculum is strategically designed to address the “what” of adopting new standards and the “how” of adapting to new ways of teaching and learning. – For Teachers: the curriculum is a tool for professional learning, not a script, and can be adapted to the needs of teachers at all stages of their practice. – For Students: the curriculum gets kids excited about reading and writing and ready to do hard work through great books, compelling topics and ownership of their own learning.

10 EL Curriculum Components 10

11 Structure of the EL Curriculum Modules 8 weeks of linked instruction, comprised of 3 units. Teaching four modules results in deep teaching and assessment of the CCSS (RL, RW, and W in 3-5). Central text(s) are chosen to be the best for the subject and standards. 11 Unit 1 Unit 2 Unit 3 Module 1 Unit 1 Unit 2 Unit 3 Module 2 Unit 1 Unit 2 Unit 3 Module 3 Unit 1 Unit 2 Unit 3 Module 4 8/9 weeks16/19 weeks24/26 weeks32/34 weeks

12 Each Module Contains Three Units In addition to instruction linked to the central text(s), each unit includes a text list of suggested classroom resources at all levels, which can be used with students at other times of the day. 12 Unit 1 Unit 2 Unit 3 Module 1Module 2A/BModule 3A/BModule 4 Building Background Knowledge (2-2.5 weeks) Extended Reading and Research (2-2.5 weeks) Extended Writing (2-2.5 weeks) Unit 1 Unit 2 Unit 3 Unit 1 Unit 2 Unit 3 Unit 1 Unit 2 Unit 3

13 On-demand and Performance Assessment 13 UNIT  UNIT  UNIT  UNIT  UNIT  UNIT  UNIT  UNIT  UNIT  Mid-Unit Assessments End of Unit Assessments Culminating Performance Task 7 formal assessments, in addition to daily opportunities to check for understanding via homework, entry and exit tickets, and in- class assignments on-demand, usually tied to reading tied to standards checkpoint before progressing on-demand, usually emphasizes writing tied to standards Measures understanding of content and skills takes place over Unit 3, aligned to a type of writing tied to standards addressed across Units 1 and 2 requires research and writing from sources

14 Take a Look at the Curriculum Locate any lesson plan (please share with a neighbor). As said this morning – let’s not ask teachers to hit a target they can’t see. What aligns with what you teach about lesson planning? What might you change? (All lessons are available in Microsoft Word and can be edited).

15 Standards Addressed Across the school year: – In grades 3-5, all of the reading and writing standards are covered, as well as some language standards. – In grades 6-8, all of the ELA standards are covered. Additional resources supplement the modules*: – “Recommendations for Teaching Reading Foundations and Language Standards in Grades 3-5” – A resource to support Independent Reading *We will dive into these resources during Session 6 tomorrow. 15

16 Welcome! A little about me: – Co-director of Expeditionary Learning’s Common Core Curriculum Project (EngageNY). – Director of EL’s Teacher Potential Project. – Author of Common Core Unit by Unit. – High school teacher.

17 Our Beliefs about Professional Development So I will ask you to engage in a variety of activities. Adult learning is active. So I will invite you to participate in a variety of structured discussions with your colleagues. Adult learning is collaborative. So please ask questions, share your reactions and personal experiences, and push for clarity. Adult learning is self-directed.

18 For Example, p. 3 (Work in Groups)

19 We will return to this activity …after you’ve learned a bit more about close reading.

20 The Norms for Collaboration, p. 4 Paying attention to these habits ensures active collaboration and the emotional safety needed for self-direction. Review this list and descriptions and discuss in your triad: – Which are strengths for you? – Which did you most need from others? – Which did you display or notice in the last activity? – Was there anything missing that your group should pay attention to throughout the day?

21 Our Work Today: Building Your Skill and Confidence TargetsActivities I can describe the process and purpose of close reading. Model lesson and debrief Analyzing texts. Examining text-dependent questions. I can identify opportunities for close reading in social studies. Finding and selecting complex texts. Developing questions.

22 Understanding Close Reading by Reading Closely

23 Be a Reader, p. 5 in your handouts packet (c) Cheryl Becker Dobbertin, 2013 The Physical Deterioration of the Textile Workers [P. Gaskell, The Manufacturing Population of England. London, 1833, pp , ] Any man who has stood at twelve o'clock at the single narrow door-way, which serves as the place of exit for the hands employed in the great cotton-mills, must acknowledge, that an uglier set of men and women, of boys and girls, taking them in the mass, it would be impossible to congregate in a smaller compass. Their complexion is sallow and pallid--with a peculiar flatness of feature, caused by the want of a proper quantity of adipose substance to cushion out the cheeks. Their stature low--the average height of four hundred men, measured at different times, and different places, being five feet six inches. Their limbs slender, and playing badly and ungracefully. A very general bowing of the legs. Great numbers of girls and women walking lamely or awkwardly, with raised chests and spinal flexures. Nearly all have flat feet, accompanied with a down-tread, differing very widely from the elasticity of action in the foot and ankle, attendant upon perfect formation. Hair thin and straight--many of the men having but little beard, and that in patches of a few hairs, much resembling its growth among the red men of America. A spiritless and dejected air, a sprawling and wide action of the legs, and an appearance, taken as a whole, giving the world but "little assurance of a man," or if so, "most sadly cheated of his fair proportions..." Factory labour is a species of work, in some respects singularly unfitted for children. Cooped up in a heated atmosphere, debarred the necessary exercise, remaining in one position for a series of hours, one set or system of muscles alone called into activity, it cannot be wondered at--that its effects are injurious to the physical growth of a child. Where the bony system is still imperfect, the vertical position it is compelled to retain, influences its direction; the spinal column bends beneath the weight of the head, bulges out laterally, or is dragged forward by the weight of the parts composing the chest, the pelvis yields beneath the opposing pressure downwards, and the resistance given by the thigh-bones; its capacity is lessened, sometimes more and sometimes less; the legs curve, and the whole body loses height, in consequence of this general yielding and bending of its parts.

24 Read once through for the “gist.” (c) Cheryl Becker Dobbertin, 2013 The Physical Deterioration of the Textile Workers [P. Gaskell, The Manufacturing Population of England. London, 1833, pp , ] Any man who has stood at twelve o'clock at the single narrow door-way, which serves as the place of exit for the hands employed in the great cotton-mills, must acknowledge, that an uglier set of men and women, of boys and girls, taking them in the mass, it would be impossible to congregate in a smaller compass. Their complexion is sallow and pallid--with a peculiar flatness of feature, caused by the want of a proper quantity of adipose substance to cushion out the cheeks. Their stature low--the average height of four hundred men, measured at different times, and different places, being five feet six inches. Their limbs slender, and playing badly and ungracefully. A very general bowing of the legs. Great numbers of girls and women walking lamely or awkwardly, with raised chests and spinal flexures. Nearly all have flat feet, accompanied with a down-tread, differing very widely from the elasticity of action in the foot and ankle, attendant upon perfect formation. Hair thin and straight--many of the men having but little beard, and that in patches of a few hairs, much resembling its growth among the red men of America. A spiritless and dejected air, a sprawling and wide action of the legs, and an appearance, taken as a whole, giving the world but "little assurance of a man," or if so, "most sadly cheated of his fair proportions..." Factory labour is a species of work, in some respects singularly unfitted for children. Cooped up in a heated atmosphere, debarred the necessary exercise, remaining in one position for a series of hours, one set or system of muscles alone called into activity, it cannot be wondered at--that its effects are injurious to the physical growth of a child. Where the bony system is still imperfect, the vertical position it is compelled to retain, influences its direction; the spinal column bends beneath the weight of the head, bulges out laterally, or is dragged forward by the weight of the parts composing the chest, the pelvis yields beneath the opposing pressure downwards, and the resistance given by the thigh-bones; its capacity is lessened, sometimes more and sometimes less; the legs curve, and the whole body loses height, in consequence of this general yielding and bending of its parts. What is this mostly about?

25 Our Targets (c) Cheryl Becker Dobbertin, 2013 I can determine words and phrases from context while reading primary sources. I can determine an author’s perspective on the industrial revolution, supporting my opinions with evidence from text.

26 Digging into Specifics (c) Cheryl Becker Dobbertin, 2013 The Physical Deterioration of the Textile Workers [P. Gaskell, The Manufacturing Population of England. London, 1833, pp , ] Any man who has stood at twelve o'clock at the single narrow door- way, which serves as the place of exit for the hands employed in the great cotton-mills, must acknowledge, that an uglier set of men and women, of boys and girls, taking them in the mass, it would be impossible to congregate in a smaller compass. Work with a partner near you to put this opening sentence in your own words. Does this matter? Why? What difference does it make in your understanding?

27 Figuring Out Words from Context (c) Cheryl Becker Dobbertin, 2013 Their complexion is sallow and pallid--with a peculiar flatness of feature, caused by the want of a proper quantity of adipose substance to cushion out the cheeks. Their stature low--the average height of four hundred men, measured at different times, and different places, being five feet six inches. Hair thin and straight--many of the men having but little beard, and that in patches of a few hairs, much resembling its growth among the red men of America. A spiritless and dejected air…

28 Can you see it in your mind? (c) Cheryl Becker Dobbertin, 2013 Any man who has stood at twelve o'clock at the single narrow door-way, which serves as the place of exit for the hands employed in the great cotton-mills, must acknowledge, that an uglier set of men and women, of boys and girls, taking them in the mass, it would be impossible to congregate in a smaller compass. Their complexion is sallow and pallid--with a peculiar flatness of feature, caused by the want of a proper quantity of adipose substance to cushion out the cheeks. Their stature low--the average height of four hundred men, measured at different times, and different places, being five feet six inches. Their limbs slender, and playing badly and ungracefully. A very general bowing of the legs. Great numbers of girls and women walking lamely or awkwardly, with raised chests and spinal flexures. Nearly all have flat feet, accompanied with a down-tread, differing very widely from the elasticity of action in the foot and ankle, attendant upon perfect formation. Hair thin and straight--many of the men having but little beard, and that in patches of a few hairs, much resembling its growth among the red men of America. A spiritless and dejected air, a sprawling and wide action of the legs, and an appearance, taken as a whole, giving the world but "little assurance of a man," or if so, "most sadly cheated of his fair proportions..." Make a quick sketch of what you see in your mind’s eye when you read about these textile workers.

29 Tackle with your partner (c) Cheryl Becker Dobbertin, 2013 Factory labour is a species of work, in some respects singularly unfitted for children. Cooped up in a heated atmosphere, debarred the necessary exercise, remaining in one position for a series of hours, one set or system of muscles alone called into activity, it cannot be wondered at--that its effects are injurious to the physical growth of a child. Highlight or underline the specific effects this author says factory labour has on children. Where the bony system is still imperfect, the vertical position it is compelled to retain, influences its direction; the spinal column bends beneath the weight of the head, bulges out laterally, or is dragged forward by the weight of the parts composing the chest, the pelvis yields beneath the opposing pressure downwards, and the resistance given by the thigh-bones; its capacity is lessened, sometimes more and sometimes less; the legs curve, and the whole body loses height, in consequence of this general yielding and bending of its parts. Sketch the body of a child factory worker as this author describes it.

30 What does this author believe? (c) Cheryl Becker Dobbertin, 2013 Collect some thoughts before we talk… – Did this author believe the impacts of working in a textile mill were severe? Use specific evidence from the text to support your answer. – If you asked this author “is industrialization good?” what might he say? Back up your inference with evidence from the text.

31 How did you do today? (c) Cheryl Becker Dobbertin, 2013 Write on an “exit ticket” – Based on all that you have learned about the IR, including what you read today, were the benefits of the British Industrial Revolution worth the cost? Also, score yourself 1(lowest) – 5 (highest) and explain: – I can determine words and phrases from context while reading primary sources. – I can determine an author’s perspective on the industrial revolution, supporting my opinions with evidence from text.

32 You just experienced “close reading.” (c) Cheryl Becker Dobbertin, 2013 What did you notice about the text used for this lesson? What were the parts of the lesson? What did you learn in terms of content? What did you learn in terms of reading?

33 A Lesson Plan for What You Just Experienced See pages 6-7 in your handouts packet. Discuss with a partner: – What might you need to pay more attention to that you usually do when planning a close reading lesson (rather than other kinds of reading lessons)?

34 Further Reading About Close Reading Pgs in Supporting All Students with Complex Texts booklet. As you read, compare this scenario to what you just experienced in order to determine the essential elements of close reading in the content areas. Essential elements: – A complex text. – Students grapple with teacher supporting after kids “have a go.” – Attention to both content (what text says) and structure (how it says it). – Attention to the author and the author’s point of view. – A focus on what can be learned from the text.

35 Back to the Close Reading Y/N/M activity Re-read the scenarios and change or confirm your initial answers. Let’s discuss where you changed you mind and why.

36 The Role of Complex Text

37 Why? Driver of this conversation: Reading Between the Lines, ACT. Set benchmark score on the reading test shown to be predictive of success in college (“21” on ACT composite score). Looked at results from a half million students. 37

38 Performance on the ACT Reading Test by Comprehension Level 38

39 Performance on the ACT Reading Test by Textual Element 39

40 40 Performance on the ACT Reading Test Related to Degree of Text Complexity In this figure, performance on questions associated with uncomplicated and more challenging texts both above and below the ACT College Readiness Benchmark for Reading follows a pattern similar to those in the previous analyses. Improvement on each of the two kinds of questions is gradual and fairly uniform. 40

41 Analyzing Text Sets Imagine you were teaching an Industrial Revolution unit and had come across the texts on pgs in your handouts. Read carefully and discuss: – Which of these texts is most complex? Least complex? – Once you have agreed upon the most complex text, literally mark (underline or highlight) different aspects of the text that make it complex. – Each team will report out: Which aspects of the text (broader than the words in the text) did you consider?

42 Qualitative Factors of Complexity, pg. 21 in Supporting All Students booklet Levels of Purpose Structure Language Conventionality and Clarity Knowledge Demands

43 Rubric p. 52 in Supporting All Students

44 Text Complexity Text complexity is defined by: Qualitative Qualitative measures – levels of meaning, structure, language conventionality and clarity, and knowledge demands often best measured by an attentive human reader. Quantitative Quantitative measures – readability and other scores of text complexity often best measured by computer software. See pages 19 and 50 in Supporting All Students. Reader and Task Reader and Task considerations – background knowledge of reader, motivation, interests, and complexity generated by tasks assigned often best made by educators employing their professional judgment. 44

45 Quantitative Factors

46 It’s Not “Either/Or” (pg. 13 Supporting All Students)

47 Creating a Staircase of Complexity Across Units Most Challenging Mid-Way Simplest

48 Locating Complex Texts Head off to your favorite sources of text/primary sources. Select something that fits the complexity criteria for your grade level: – Higher on the rubric and/or – In the band for your grade level using Fleisch Kincaid and/or – Both Library of Congress (loc.gov) sources.html sources.html

49 School Team, Small Group Discussions How often are our students given the opportunity and support needed to tackle complex texts in our content area? Are we creating a Staircase of Complexity within units and across units for our students? If not, what do we need to do differently?

50 Break

51 Text-Dependent Questions Not assessments or “comprehension checks.” When pre-planned and students are held accountable for engaging with them, are a strategy that shine a light on key sections of the text. Can “lift students to the text.”

52 Questions You Answered When We Were Reading Closely What is this mostly about? What does this mean? Their complexion is sallow and pallid--with a peculiar flatness of feature, caused by the want of a proper quantity of adipose substance to cushion out the cheeks. Highlight or underline the specific effects this author says factory labour has on children. Did this author believe the impacts of working in a textile mill were severe? Use specific evidence from the text to support your answer. If you asked this author “is industrialization good?” what might he say? Back up your inference with evidence from the text. (You might think both about what is said and what is unsaid.)

53 In your Supporting All Students booklet, pgs Also use notecatcher on page 17 of your handouts. Read and capture key ideas about each aspect of developing text- dependent questions. When you are done reading, talk with a partner about your own questioning techniques. Are you asking “text-dependent” questions? Do you plan questions? What are the implications of your current questioning habits?

54 Pg. 18, Checklist for Questions

55 Use the Checklist on These Questions. What Do You Notice? What is this mostly about? What does this mean? Their complexion is sallow and pallid--with a peculiar flatness of feature, caused by the want of a proper quantity of adipose substance to cushion out the cheeks. Highlight or underline the specific effects this author says factory labour has on children. Did this author believe the impacts of working in a textile mill were severe? Use specific evidence from the text to support your answer. If you asked this author “is industrialization good?” what might he say? Back up your inference with evidence from the text. (You might think both about what is said and what is unsaid.)

56 Your Turn Take a close look at the texts you brought with you today. – Staircase of complexity? – Develop a strategic set of TDQs Start Small to Build Confidence Tackle tough sections head on (shine that light!) – Check your work against the Checklist, share what you have done well with a partner. Get advice with what you are challenged by.

57 Holding Kids Accountable for Rigorous Work This is a whole ‘nother workshop ( ) but here’s a snapshot Schoolwide Structures for Checking for Understanding video. Schoolwide Structures for Checking for Understanding All of our videos are publically available – (search Expeditionary Learning).www.vimeo.com

58 In Closing The biggest difference between close reading in Social Studies and other types of reading in SS is…….


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