Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

4textB Table Manners and Customs Go to Text A.  First Reading First Reading  Summary of Text B Summary of Text B  Detailed Study of Text B  Second.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "4textB Table Manners and Customs Go to Text A.  First Reading First Reading  Summary of Text B Summary of Text B  Detailed Study of Text B  Second."— Presentation transcript:

1 4textB Table Manners and Customs Go to Text A

2  First Reading First Reading  Summary of Text B Summary of Text B  Detailed Study of Text B  Second Reading Second Reading  Text Reading 4content  Time For Fun

3 1. Using the knife only for cutting is considered good table manners in Great Britain. 2. British people don’t like foreign table manners. 3. Sitting on a cushion before a low table is typically Japanese table manners.  First Reading F T T ( ) First reading1 1/2 Read the text and then decide whether the following statements are True or False according to the text.

4 4. Western table manners differ greatly from country to country. 5. How to use a knife while eating is quite different among Western countries. 6. It seems that salt used to be something valuable in Britain. F T T ( )  First Reading First reading2 2/2

5 Read the text again and answer the following questions. 1. What are considered good manners at table in Britain nowadays? The following are considered good manners at table in Great Britain today: eating with the mouth closed; not letting any of the food fall off the plate; using the knife only for cutting; and not trying to take food across the table.  Second Reading Second reading1 1/4

6 2. How are the western eating styles taken up by people in the East? Give examples. When they are richer and more educated, some people in the East have taken up the table manners and customs of western people, such as replacing the cushions with tables and chairs, or with the lady of the house presiding at one end of the table. 3. Do western people have same or different table manners? Western people in different countries have different table manners, although the differences are not so marked. 2/4

7 5. How do the drinking customs in North America differ from those in Europe? 4. What is the slight difference in the use of the knife at British and American meals? At America meals, the knife should be put down after use, while during British meals, the knife should be kept in the right hand all the time. In Europe, water, wine or beer is drunk with meals and coffee or tea is taken afterwards, while North America a beverage such as coffee, tea or milk is drunk with meals. Second reading2 3/4

8 8. Why did the French King order that table knives should have rounded ends in the 17th century? 7. What was used to help with eating food before forks appeared in Europe? The women waited on the warriors and afterwards ate what they left. 6. How did ancient men and women have their meals? By using their fingers or hands. To prevent people from stabbing each other while they were eating. Second reading3 4/4

9 textB_1 Table Manners and Customs  Detailed Study of Text B In Great Britain today good manners at table include eating with the mouth closed; not letting any of the food fall off the plate; using the knife only for cutting; and not trying to take food across the table. In other parts of the world there are also rules for people to follow when they are eating, but they are not the same as those of Britain. Indeed, what are considered good table manners in some other countries are what British people try hardest to avoid. In Arabia, for instance, the people at a feast take pieces of food with their fingers and belch loudly to show that they have appreciated it. 1/5

10 Table Manners and Customs In Great Britain today good manners at table include eating with the mouth closed; not letting any of the food fall off the plate; using the knife only for cutting; and not trying to take food across the table. In other parts of the world there are also rules for people to follow when they are eating, but they are not the same as those of Britain. Indeed, what are considered good table manners in some other countries are what British people try hardest to avoid. In Arabia, for instance, the people at a feast take pieces of food with their fingers and belch loudly to show that they have appreciated it. 1/5 Table manner Close It's considered good manners in some societies to leave a little food on your plate. Table Manners. The word “manners” used in the plural form means habits and customs. Table manners are the way people behave at meals. It isn’t good manners to make too many inquiries into people’s personal affairs.  Detailed Study of Text B

11 Table Manners and Customs In Great Britain today good manners at table include eating with the mouth closed; not letting any of the food fall off the plate; using the knife only for cutting; and not trying to take food across the table. In other parts of the world there are also rules for people to follow when they are eating, but they are not the same as those of Britain. Indeed, what are considered good table manners in some other countries are what British people try hardest to avoid. In Arabia, for instance, the people at a feast take pieces of food with their fingers and belch loudly to show that they have appreciated it. 1/5 Fall off fall off: to come off (something) by falling A button has fallen off my coat. Has that child fallen off the bicycle again? Close  Detailed Study of Text B

12 Table Manners and Customs In Great Britain today good manners at table include eating with the mouth closed; not letting any of the food fall off the plate; using the knife only for cutting; and not trying to take food across the table. In other parts of the world there are also rules for people to follow when they are eating, but they are not the same as those of Britain. Indeed, what are considered good table manners in some other countries are what British people try hardest to avoid. In Arabia, for instance, the people at a feast take pieces of food with their fingers and belch loudly to show that they have appreciated it. 1/5 There are also I think the same as you do about this. He gets the same pay as me but he has his own office. the same (...) as: used to mean two or more people, things, etc. that are exactly like each other... there are also rules for people to follow when they are eating, but they are not the same as those of Britain. — …when people are eating they act according to some rules, but these rules are different from those of Britain. Close  Detailed Study of Text B

13 Table Manners and Customs In Great Britain today good manners at table include eating with the mouth closed; not letting any of the food fall off the plate; using the knife only for cutting; and not trying to take food across the table. In other parts of the world there are also rules for people to follow when they are eating, but they are not the same as those of Britain. Indeed, what are considered good table manners in some other countries are what British people try hardest to avoid. In Arabia, for instance, the people at a feast take pieces of food with their fingers and belch loudly to show that they have appreciated it. 1/5 indeed Indeed, what are considered good table manners in some other countries are what British people try hardest to avoid. — Indeed, certain ways of behaving at table are considered good manners in some other countries but British people would try their best to avoid them. 翻译 事实上,一些其它国家认为的餐桌上的好礼仪, 英国人却极力地避免。 Close  Detailed Study of Text B

14 Table Manners and Customs In Great Britain today good manners at table include eating with the mouth closed; not letting any of the food fall off the plate; using the knife only for cutting; and not trying to take food across the table. In other parts of the world there are also rules for people to follow when they are eating, but they are not the same as those of Britain. Indeed, what are considered good table manners in some other countries are what British people try hardest to avoid. In Arabia, for instance, the people at a feast take pieces of food with their fingers and belch loudly to show that they have appreciated it. 1/5 appreciate: v. to recognize and enjoy the good qualities of something; understand something and show consideration or sympathy You can’t fully appreciate foreign literature in translation. I really appreciate a good cup of tea. Close appreciate  Detailed Study of Text B

15 The richer and more educated people in the East have, however, to a great extent taken up the table manners and customs of western people. Tables and chairs have replaced the cushions of the past, and the lady of the house presides at one end of the table in the same way that Western women do. Many Japanese, however, still feel it would be wrong to eat unless they were sitting on a cushion before a low table with a tray of food on it. In many parts of the world both traditional and Western styles of eating exist side by side. textB_2 2/5

16 The richer and more educated people in the East have, however, to a great extent taken up the table manners and customs of western people. Tables and chairs have replaced the cushions of the past, and the lady of the house presides at one end of the table in the same way that Western women do. Many Japanese, however, still feel it would be wrong to eat unless they were sitting on a cushion before a low table with a tray of food on it. In many parts of the world both traditional and Western styles of eating exist side by side. The richer and more educated people in the East have, however, to a great extent taken up the table manners... — However, the richer and more educated people in the East have largely accepted and learned to practice the table manners... The richer and more 翻译 然而,富裕而且受教育多的东方人在很大程度上接受西方的 餐桌礼仪和习俗。

17 The richer and more educated people in the East have, however, to a great extent taken up the table manners and customs of western people. Tables and chairs have replaced the cushions of the past, and the lady of the house presides at one end of the table in the same way that Western women do. Many Japanese, however, still feel it would be wrong to eat unless they were sitting on a cushion before a low table with a tray of food on it. In many parts of the world both traditional and Western styles of eating exist side by side. to a great/large extent: to a great / large degree These policies are to a large extent responsible for the region’s economic problem. cf. to a certain extent / to some extent: used to mean that something is partly, but not completely, true take up: to learn or start to perform a certain activity, especially for pleasure; start or begin something, especially a job She has taken up golf. She has taken up a job as a teacher. Close The richer and more 2/5

18 The richer and more educated people in the East have, however, to a great extent taken up the table manners and customs of western people. Tables and chairs have replaced the cushions of the past, and the lady of the house presides at one end of the table in the same way that Western women do. Many Japanese, however, still feel it would be wrong to eat unless they were sitting on a cushion before a low table with a tray of food on it. In many parts of the world both traditional and Western styles of eating exist side by side. replace: vt. to use something instead of something else; start doing something instead of someone else These PCs have replaced the old system network. I’m replacing Sue on the team. Close replace 2/5

19 The richer and more educated people in the East have, however, to a great extent taken up the table manners and customs of western people. Tables and chairs have replaced the cushions of the past, and the lady of the house presides at one end of the table in the same way that Western women do. Many Japanese, however, still feel it would be wrong to eat unless they were sitting on a cushion before a low table with a tray of food on it. In many parts of the world both traditional and Western styles of eating exist side by side.... both traditional and Western styles of eating exist side by side. —...there are both traditional and Western table manners. side by side: 1. if things or groups exist side by side, they exist in the same place or at the same time. The two communities exist happily side by side. 2. next to each other The children sat side by side watching television. Close Both traditional 2/5

20 In the West there are differences between table manners in various countries, although they are not so marked. In North America it is polite to cut up meat and then put the knife down, take the fork in the right hand and eat with it. Most European people, like the British, keep the fork in the left hand and the knife in the right all the time when they are eating food that has to be cut. In the British Isles and Scandinavia (Norway, Sweden, Denmark and Iceland) special knives and forks are used for eating fish. In France, Belgium and Italy, however, it is correct to keep the same knife for every course, wiping it on a piece of bread. textB_3 3/5

21 In the West there are differences between table manners in various countries, although they are not so marked. In North America it is polite to cut up meat and then put the knife down, take the fork in the right hand and eat with it. Most European people, like the British, keep the fork in the left hand and the knife in the right all the time when they are eating food that has to be cut. In the British Isles and Scandinavia (Norway, Sweden, Denmark and Iceland) special knives and forks are used for eating fish. In France, Belgium and Italy, however, it is correct to keep the same knife for every course, wiping it on a piece of bread. 3/5 In various countries... in various countries, although they are not so marked. —... in different countries, although it is not easy to notice these differences 翻译 在西方,不同的国家有不同的餐桌礼仪,尽管这些 差异不那么明显。 Close

22 In the West there are differences between table manners in various countries, although they are not so marked. In North America it is polite to cut up meat and then put the knife down, take the fork in the right hand and eat with it. Most European people, like the British, keep the fork in the left hand and the knife in the right all the time when they are eating food that has to be cut. In the British Isles and Scandinavia (Norway, Sweden, Denmark and Iceland) special knives and forks are used for eating fish. In France, Belgium and Italy, however, it is correct to keep the same knife for every course, wiping it on a piece of bread. 3/5 course course: n. a part of a meal which is served separately from the other parts a four-course lunch A traditional British main course consists of a meat dish with potatoes and other vegetables. Close

23 Drinking customs at table also vary in different countries. In Europe, water, wine or beer is drunk with meals and coffee or tea is taken afterwards. In North America a beverage such as coffee, tea or milk is drunk with meals. Table manners of course have changed with time. The earliest meals were also the simplest. They were eaten sitting on the ground round a fire, and everyone took his food from a pot on the fire or cut bits from the animal or bird that had been cooked. The women waited on the warriors and afterwards ate what they left. textB_4 4/5

24 Drinking customs at table also vary in different countries. In Europe, water, wine or beer is drunk with meals and coffee or tea is taken afterwards. In North America a beverage such as coffee, tea or milk is drunk with meals. Table manners of course have changed with time. The earliest meals were also the simplest. They were eaten sitting on the ground round a fire, and everyone took his food from a pot on the fire or cut bits from the animal or bird that had been cooked. The women waited on the warriors and afterwards ate what they left. 4/5 vary vary: v. 1.to be different Teaching methods vary greatly from school to school. cf. change: v. 1. to become different His mood seems to vary according to the weather. Susan has changed a lot since I last saw her. We’ve changed from traditional methods of production to an automated (自动化的) system. Close 2.to change often 2. to stop having or doing one thing and start having or doing something else instead

25 Drinking customs at table also vary in different countries. In Europe, water, wine or beer is drunk with meals and coffee or tea is taken afterwards. In North America a beverage such as coffee, tea or milk is drunk with meals. Table manners of course have changed with time. The earliest meals were also the simplest. They were eaten sitting on the ground round a fire, and everyone took his food from a pot on the fire or cut bits from the animal or bird that had been cooked. The women waited on the warriors and afterwards ate what they left. 4/5 Table manner of course Table manners of course have changed with time. Please paraphrase the sentence. As time went by, table manners also have changed/ become different. Close

26 Drinking customs at table also vary in different countries. In Europe, water, wine or beer is drunk with meals and coffee or tea is taken afterwards. In North America a beverage such as coffee, tea or milk is drunk with meals. Table manners of course have changed with time. The earliest meals were also the simplest. They were eaten sitting on the ground round a fire, and everyone took his food from a pot on the fire or cut bits from the animal or bird that had been cooked. The women waited on the warriors and afterwards ate what they left. 4/5 Wait on someone wait on someone: to serve food to someone at their table The staff who waited on us at dinner were excellent. They seemed very unhappy to wait on customers there. Close 他们似乎不愿意伺候那里的顾客。

27 Fingers were used to eat food throughout the middle ages. Food was eaten off wooden dishes with the noblemen sitting above a large salt cellar called simply “the salt”. The ordinary people sat below the salt. In the reign of Henry VIII ( ), people were still eating with their hands after cutting the food with a clasp knife which was always carried at the belt. Forks were not used in England until the 17th century. Textb_5 5/5 Table manners did not always include quiet behavior. Quarrels often took place at table, and in the 17th century King Louis XIV of France ordered that all knives should have rounded ends to prevent people from stabbing each other while they were eating.

28 Fingers were used to eat food throughout the middle ages. Food was eaten off wooden dishes with the noblemen sitting above a large salt cellar called simply “the salt”. The ordinary people sat below the salt. In the reign of Henry VIII ( ), people were still eating with their hands after cutting the food with a clasp knife which was always carried at the belt. Forks were not used in England until the 17th century. 5/5 Table manners did not always include quiet behavior. Quarrels often took place at table, and in the 17th century King Louis XIV of France ordered that all knives should have rounded ends to prevent people from stabbing each other while they were eating. The middle age the middle age: also the Middle Ages, the period in European history between about AD 1100 and 1500 or sometimes, in a wider sense, between AD 500 and Close

29 Fingers were used to eat food throughout the middle ages. Food was eaten off wooden dishes with the noblemen sitting above a large salt cellar called simply “the salt”. The ordinary people sat below the salt. In the reign of Henry VIII ( ), people were still eating with their hands after cutting the food with a clasp knife which was always carried at the belt. Forks were not used in England until the 17th century. 5/5 Table manners did not always include quiet behavior. Quarrels often took place at table, and in the 17th century King Louis XIV of France ordered that all knives should have rounded ends to prevent people from stabbing each other while they were eating. Food was eaten off Food was eaten off wooden dishes with the noblemen sitting above a large salt cellar called simply “the salt”. Note the sentence structure here: a main clause + with + N + V-ing. Does the Queen really eat her meals off gold plates? Close eat off: to eat (one’s food) from (certain dishes) 翻译 人们用木碟子吃东西,而贵族们坐在一个就叫 “ 盐 ” 的大盐窖上.

30 Fingers were used to eat food throughout the middle ages. Food was eaten off wooden dishes with the noblemen sitting above a large salt cellar called simply “the salt”. The ordinary people sat below the salt. In the reign of Henry VIII ( ), people were still eating with their hands after cutting the food with a clasp knife which was always carried at the belt. Forks were not used in England until the 17th century. 5/5 Table manners did not always include quiet behavior. Quarrels often took place at table, and in the 17th century King Louis XIV of France ordered that all knives should have rounded ends to prevent people from stabbing each other while they were eating. Henry VIIL Henry VIIL: ( ) one of the most famous English Kings Forks were not used in England until the 17th century. — Only in the 17th century did people in England begin to use forks. Close

31 Fingers were used to eat food throughout the middle ages. Food was eaten off wooden dishes with the noblemen sitting above a large salt cellar called simply “the salt”. The ordinary people sat below the salt. In the reign of Henry VIII ( ), people were still eating with their hands after cutting the food with a clasp knife which was always carried at the belt. Forks were not used in England until the 17th century. 5/5 Table manners did not always include quiet behavior. Quarrels often took place at table, and in the 17th century King Louis XIV of France ordered that all knives should have rounded ends to prevent people from stabbing each other while they were eating. Louis XIV Louis XIV: ( ) a King of France, who is also called the Sun King because of the beauty and riches of his court at Versailles. Close

32 Fingers were used to eat food throughout the middle ages. Food was eaten off wooden dishes with the noblemen sitting above a large salt cellar called simply “the salt”. The ordinary people sat below the salt. In the reign of Henry VIII ( ), people were still eating with their hands after cutting the food with a clasp knife which was always carried at the belt. Forks were not used in England until the 17th century. 5/5 Table manners did not always include quiet behavior. Quarrels often took place at table, and in the 17th century King Louis XIV of France ordered that all knives should have rounded ends to prevent people from stabbing each other while they were eating. prevent prevent (from): vt. to stop someone from doing something The rain prevented me (from) coming. His back injury may prevent him from playing in tomorrow’s game. Close

33  Summary of Text B Table manners in our world differ from country to country and from region to region. Western style of eating is considered to have largely influenced Eastern countries. But even Western countries themselves differ in this respect. People in these countries do not use the knife and fork in the same way. There are also differences in drinking customs. And naturally table manners have seen many changes throughout history, from ancient times, through the Middle Ages, to the 17th century. These changes include the kinds of food, the containers for holding food and special rules of behavior. Summary of textb Click the title to continue…

34 Time For Fun 1 Six-year-old Linda returned unimpressed from her first day at school. Asked how she got on, she replied, “Every morning we are going to have roll call. We all have to sit at our desks and when the teacher calls our name we have to answer, ‘Prisoner’”. 2 Etc.: Sign used to make others believe you know more than you do. 3 A professor, telling a student that there was no excuse for his poor spelling, said “You should consult a dictionary whenever you are in doubt. It’s as simple as that.” The student appeared confused. “But, sir,” he replied. “I’m never in doubt.” 1/2

35 4 Doctor: I have some bad news and some very bad news. Patient: Well, might as well give me the bad news first. Doctor: The lab called with your test results. They said you have 24 hours to live. Patient: 24 hours! That’s terrible! What could be worse? What’s the very bad news? Doctor: I’ve been trying to reach you since yesterday. 2/2


Download ppt "4textB Table Manners and Customs Go to Text A.  First Reading First Reading  Summary of Text B Summary of Text B  Detailed Study of Text B  Second."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google