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Appalachian Farming --Trista Wilson Council High School 10:00 Appalachian History December 6, 2006.

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Presentation on theme: "Appalachian Farming --Trista Wilson Council High School 10:00 Appalachian History December 6, 2006."— Presentation transcript:

1 Appalachian Farming --Trista Wilson Council High School 10:00 Appalachian History December 6, 2006

2 “To every thing there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven: A time to be born, and a time to die; a time to plant, and a time to pluck up that which is planted” --Ecclesiastes 3:1-2

3 In 1882, my great-great grandfather Wilson and my great-great-great grandfather Ball bought 218 acres of land in Buchanan County and a small portion of Russell County. They divided the land between themselves in My great-great grandfather Wilson kept the 116 acres that I live on today, and my great-great-great- grandfather Ball kept 102 acres which was eventually sold.

4 Grandfather Wilson scouted the land until he found a fresh water spring.

5 He then decided that this would be the best place to build a house for his family and he.

6 “Old House”The Old Smokehouse The Old Dairy The Kitchen to the “Old House” that was built on later

7 With the house built and the need to support his family at hand, Grandfather Wilson knew that working alone could not provide enough for the family. Like most families living in the area at the time, raising a farm was an inevitable factor in feeding a large family.

8 Ever since then, this land has been used for farming. Not only has the farm been handed down from generation to generation, but the knowledge that comes in farming has, too.

9 From cattle raising and hog slaughtering…

10 …to garden raising and canning, the Wilson family has been born and raised on farming.

11 BarnBarn (closer view) Barn LoftBarn Ground

12 --Trough carved out of tree Grapevine-- --Barn Storage Room Hay Roll Ring-- --Cow named “Granny” Feed Storage--

13 Trough Cattle Chute Corn Crib Inside Corn Crib

14 More Things to See on a Farm

15 The Appalachian Mountains have become home to many families, and the seclusion the mountain range offers causes many of those families to become close-knit neighbors. Throughout the years, Appalachia has become its own country to a certain extent.

16 The relatively small communities that rest in the depths of Appalachia have benefited this area in ways that make newcomers feel welcomed and at home.

17 “He has made everything beautiful in his time: also he hath set the world in their heart, so that no man can find out the work that God maketh from the beginning to the end.” --Ecclesiastes 3:11

18 Bibliography Grymes, Charles A. "Virginia Places.” Virginia Agriculture Site designed for George Mason University. 28 Sept "The Nine Regions of Virginia.” Ohio University. Copyright Ohio University Zanesville. 28 Sept Wilson, Giles. Personal Interview. November 19, 2006.

19 --Created by Trista Wilson December 2006


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