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First Quarter Activities THE Class of 2012!. First Period 1. Emergency Procedures  Fire—Out the door, turn left until you are going up the stairs ▪ Stick.

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Presentation on theme: "First Quarter Activities THE Class of 2012!. First Period 1. Emergency Procedures  Fire—Out the door, turn left until you are going up the stairs ▪ Stick."— Presentation transcript:

1 First Quarter Activities THE Class of 2012!

2 First Period 1. Emergency Procedures  Fire—Out the door, turn left until you are going up the stairs ▪ Stick together as a class ▪ Pay attention and respond as roll is called ▪ We will not lose anyone  Tornado ▪ Go to restrooms—Girls to girls’, Boys to boys’ ▪ Cover your head ▪ Remain quiet and listen for instructions 2. Pass out materials  Student Code of Conduct  Student Expectations X2  Cell Phone policy  Dress Code 3. All paper work must be turned in to First Period teacher by Thursday, August 18

3 Second Period 1. Emergency Procedures  Fire—Out the door, turn left until you are going up the stairs ▪ Stick together as a class ▪ Pay attention and respond as roll is called ▪ We will not lose anyone  Tornado ▪ Go to restrooms—Girls to girls’, Boys to boys’ ▪ Cover your head ▪ Remain quiet and listen for instructions 2. Student Behavior pp  Student Code of Conduct  Student Expectations X2  Cell Phone policy  Dress Code 3. All paper work must be turned in to First Period teacher by Thursday, August 18

4  LOWER LEVEL  JROTC –  SOPH –  JUNIORS – AND   UPPER LEVEL  FRESH –  SRS – AND AND LOWER LEVEL

5  Emergency Information—before we leave port!  Welcome to English IV  Get out a piece of paper and a pen or pencil  Answer only the questions that are numbered  What are some things you are looking forward to this year?  What do you think you will be prepared to do when you graduate? ▪ Get a job ▪ Raise kids ▪ Get a scholarship ▪ Run a business ▪ Buy a house ▪ Take over the world 1. List anything you would like to do and you think you would be prepared to do when you graduate next June—think beyond this list.

6 3. Choose three topics from the list below, and write a paragraph for each one in which you demonstrate the following:  Effective paragraphing  Good use of a variety of sentences  Rich vocabulary ▪ Vacation ▪ Road music ▪ Listening to others’ stories ▪ Coming together as a group ▪ What we can learn from someone by the way they dress ▪ What we can learn from someone by the stories they tell

7  This is not a Self-Cleaning Facility!  Pick up your Trash, and Clean up around your seat Before you leave!

8  Look over your syllabus 1. Write down any questions you have concerning the information on the syllabus THIS MAY BE A THORNY ISSUE

9 WHAT ARE THESE ANGELS DOING? 2. List five things you know (or think you know) about Medieval times. 3. Read “The Ruin”  What ideas that you listed in your last answer can you see in this poem? In other words, how does this poem meet your expectations of Medieval literature?

10  Attention Students  All lockers that were reported as being broken or would not open, prior to 11:00am yesterday have been fixed. This excuse for being tardy will no longer fly with Mr. E.   Learning Target  SWBAT develop opinions based upon seemingly unrelated details.

11  You may use the dictionaries and discuss with your neighbors, but you will only have four minutes to develop at least some understanding of these issues  Mausoleums  The Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington National Cemetery  Paupers’ graves  Our dog is buried in our back yard in a shady spot with flowers

12  A little bell ringer for you  List six ideas you could use to argue for your opinion on both of the following topics:  Where someone is buried is a reflection of how important he or she was in life.  People who know and understand a wide range of people from a wide variety of backgrounds can be very good judges (critics) of a culture.

13  Pick one of the bullets you just wrote about, and use something from p.96 about Geoffrey Chaucer to write a paragraph focused on either burial or being a cultural critic.

14  The following will serve as material for a test over this unit. 1. List the three things you find most interesting about Chaucer’s life. 2. Explain the difference between “direct” and “indirect” characterization. 3. Use each vocabulary word on p. 97 in a sentence which shows you understand the meaning of the word. 4. Contrast the Knight with his son.

15 5. Monks, nuns, and friars usually take vows of poverty, promising to own only what is absolutely necessary. How do the Nun, the Monk, and the Friar seem to break that rule? 6. Contrast the Oxford Cleric with these religious people. Who is better? Why? 7. Is Chaucer sarcastic in his praise for the Sergeant at Law? Explain your answer using examples of direct and indirect characterization. 8. Describe the Franklin’s table. Why would he do this? What do you think Chaucer want his audience to think of the Franklin? 9. Being a Haberdasher (hat maker), a Dyer, or a Carpenter were noble professions during Chaucer’s time, and these professions often allowed a man to raise his social rank. How might the actions of the wives of these men reflect possible social climbing?

16  Learning Target  SWBAT examine and explain satire in Canterbury Tales  Look at p.103 in your text book.  Write down a description of the Monk pictured on that page

17 A. I could of gone if my car would of started. B. It must of been a great show. C. We should of taken the exit ten miles back. D. Where would you of gone if you hadn’t seen that. E. We seen you at the fair.  Satire-a literary work holding up human vices and follies to ridicule or scorn. 2. : trenchant wit, irony, or sarcasm used to expose and discredit vice or folly  Know the definition of satire, and learn to recognize it in literature.  Think of examples of satire in our culture.  Mine: State Farm commercial— “I could have had a falcon.”

18  Since the 6th century, monks and nuns following the Rule of Saint Benedict have been making the so-called Benedictine vow at their public profession of obedience (placing oneself under the direction of the abbot/abbess or prior/prioress), stability (committing oneself to a particular monastery), and "conversion of manners" (which includes forgoing private ownership and celibate chastity). [2]monksnunsRule of Saint Benedictprofession [2]

19  During the 12th and 13th centuries mendicant orders emerged, such as the Franciscans and Dominicans, whose vocation emphasizing mobility and flexibility required them to drop the concept of "stability". They therefore profess chastity, poverty and obedience, like the members of many other orders and religious congregations founded subsequently. The public profession of these so-called Evangelical counsels (or counsels of perfection), confirmed by vow or other sacred bond, are now a requirement according to modern Church Law. [3]mendicant ordersFranciscansDominicansprofess professionEvangelical counsels counsels of perfection [3]

20  The "clerks regular" of the 16th century and after, such as the Jesuits and Redemptorists, followed this same general format, though some added a "fourth vow", indicating some special apostolate or attitude within the order. Fully professed Jesuits (known as "the professed of the fourth vow" within the order), take a vow of particular obedience to the Pope to undertake any mission laid out in their Formula of the Institute. The Missionaries of Charity, founded by Mother Teresa centuries later (1940s), are another example of this, in that her sisters take a fourth vow of special service to "the poorest of the poor".JesuitsRedemptoristsPopeMissionaries of Charity

21  Learning Target  SWBAT use active reading to find information for answering questions.  Answer the following all on the same piece of paper, separate from everything else  Please be sure to put your name on it 1. Explain what reading is 2. What have you read that you have enjoyed? List at least three things 3. What is your earliest memory of learning to read? 4. What does it mean to be illiterate? 5. Have you ever been taught to be a better reader? 6. What does it mean to be a “better reader”? 7. If you were going to pick a book to read, what kind of book would it be? 8. List five things that you are interested in (sports, hunting, fashion, politics, etymology, geopolitics, makeup, music, etc.)

22  SWBAT explain how connotations are used for satirical effect in Canterbury Tales  Answer the following, and turn your answers in to the tray on top of the wooden shelf on the north wall of the room (between the windows) 1. Explain how active reading is different from passive reading? 2. Why do you think Mr. E thinks active reading is more efficient than passive reading? 3. How can active reading be used to complete the homework assignment you will have completed by Wednesday? 4. Give me an example of how you can read actively.

23  Rewrite the following so they are grammatically correct and still retain the meaning of the original. A. Across the creek and through the corn field. Bears have frequently stayed in that area. B. In the corner lot his neighbor was cutting fire wood. C. Frequently, as the winter got colder. People would see the mother looking for food. D. Dave should of broke the window. E. Waiting to go to school.

24  SWBAT explain how literary elements in Canterbury Tales are used. A. Write a paragraph using examples from what we have read so far to explain what you think is Chaucer’s philosophy. How does he look at people? What does he think of the people on this trip?

25  SWBAT defend a reading choice based on established standards. A. Turn in your homework B. On a separate piece of paper, list five good reasons to read something. C. Write down what you brought or would have brought had you remembered to bring something to read.

26 D. Read your list of criteria for what makes something good to read. E. As a group, come to consensus on five criteria F. Come to consensus on who has the best thing to read in your group based on the criteria you have established G. Select someone who will share the results with the class H. Listen to the discussion I. Write down the name of one title you would like to read J. Write down the name of one title you would never read

27  Analyze and interpret a variety of literary forms, identifying and explaining an author’s use of rhetorical strategies  Create and defend arguments based on reading, research, and/or personal experience and document as necessary using the MLA format  Demonstrate understanding and mastery of standard written English as well as stylistic maturity in their own writing  Complete acceptable writing assignments in a variety of genres and contexts, both formal and informal, employing appropriate strategies, conventions, and techniques  Effectively develop their writing through the writing process, with careful attention to inquiry and research, planning and prewriting, drafting, revising, editing, and review  Demonstrate competencies in oral communication and the use of technological resources through presentation and projects  Discuss the historical and cultural development of literature with insight and clarity  Write effectively under time constraints  Read and analyze longer works (plays, novels, and nonfiction)

28  SWBAT relate the personal characteristics described in the Prologue of Canterbury Tales to the stories the characters tell. A. Reread the description of the Wife of Bath (beginning on 109 at the very bottom) and the Pardoner (beginning on 115), and explain what you think of them.

29  Girls will explain their understanding of the Wife of Bath’s tale  One may explain what she understands and the other can fill in details  You are responsible for your groups’ understanding  Boys will explain their understanding of the Pardoner’s tale  One may explain what she understands and the other can fill in details  You are responsible for your groups’ understanding

30 B. Describe how you think the personality of the Wife of Bath described in the Prologue fits the tale she tells (or not) C. Describe how you think the personality of the Pardoner described in the Prologue fits the tale he tells (or not)

31  Three rules for Sustained Silent Reading (or is it Silent Sustained Reading?) 1. You must at least act like you are reading 2. You must enjoy whatever it is you are reading 3. You may not talk—if we must move you to a different part of the room, that may be arranged

32  SWBAT demonstrate their mastery of parallel structure. A. Look at the poster in front of the room entitled “Road to College Checklist.” Write down three things that you are going to do before you graduate in June to prepare for life beyond high school. A special announcement:  Students will have the opportunity to nominate candidates for the Homecoming Court today and Monday, August 29 th during lunch. Each student can nominate one male and one female from his or her grade level.  Please bring Student ID when voting.

33  Read for five minutes  Three rules for Sustained Silent Reading (or is it Silent Sustained Reading?) 1. You must at least act like you are reading 2. You must enjoy whatever it is you are reading 3. You may not talk—if we must move you to a different part of the room, that may be arranged

34  SWBAT use their own writing process to write an open-response answer. A. Who is your favorite character, so far, in what you have read in The Canterbury Tales?

35  SWBAT explain the multi-faceted and complex issues upon which they will be tested tomorrow. A. Which issues being tested tomorrow do you see yourself struggling with the most.

36  SWBAT demonstrate their mastery of the standards and subject matter we’ve addressed in this first unit.  Use your own paper for your answer sheet  Copy the letter of the test form (A, B, or C) from the upper left hand corner of the test on to your paper  When you are finished with your test, turn it in, get something to read and sit at your desk quietly reading.  Talking during this class period after the test is distributed will not be tolerated

37  SWBAT explain a basic understanding of humanism. A. Are human beings and the culture they’ve developed inherently good or bad? Write a paragraph explanation in defense of your answer.

38 Many wonders there be, but naught more wondrous than man; Over the surging sea, with a whitening south wind wan, Through the foam of the firth, man makes his perilous way; And the eldest of deities Earth that knows not toil nor decay Ever he furrows and scores, as his team, year in year out, With breed of the yoked horse, the ploughshare turneth about.  Sophocles ( ). Oedipus Trilogy (p. 174). Public Domain Books. Kindle Edition.

39 The light-witted birds of the air, the beasts of the field and the wood He traps with his woven snare, and the brood of the briny flood. Master of cunning he: the savage bull, and the hart Who roams the mountain free, are tamed by his infinite art; And the shaggy rough-maned steed is broken to bear the bit. Speech and the wind-swift speed of counsel and civic wit, He hath learnt for himself all these; and the arrowy rain to fly And the nipping airs that freeze, 'neath the open winter sky. He hath provision for all: fell plague he hath learnt to endure; Safe whate'er may befall: yet for death he hath found no cure.  Sophocles ( ). Oedipus Trilogy (p. 174). Public Domain Books. Kindle Edition.

40 Passing the wildest flight thought are the cunning and skill, That guide man now to the light, but now to counsels of ill. If he honors the laws of the land, and reveres the Gods of the State Proudly his city shall stand; but a cityless outcast I rate Whoso bold in his pride from the path of right doth depart; Ne'er may I sit by his side, or share the thoughts of his heart.  Sophocles ( ). Oedipus Trilogy (pp ). Public Domain Books. Kindle Edition.

41  Coming out of the Middle Ages, Scholasticism was the educational philosophy for training doctors, lawyers, and others to do their job.  They received training in their chosen field  During the Renaissance, Humanism developed as an educational philosophy.  Humanism called for educating people, more than had been being educated, including some women, but certainly not everybody, to understand how the world worked by having them study history, art, rhetoric, etc. In this way, citizens could make decisions and have more control of their culture, their community, their world. E. Do you think the Scholasticism approach or the humanist approach is a better way to look at education? Write a paragraph response.

42  SWBAT evaluate the worth of More’s description of a king when compared to a manager. A. List five traits you expect a manager, boss, supervisor, etc. to have. B. List five traits you hate to see in a manager, boss, supervisor, etc.

43  Discuss your lists  Come up with five questions you could ask a manager that could help you decide if he or she was a good leader.  Share those questions with the class  Consider what you want or expect from political and social leaders

44 C. In what ways do you agree with Thomas More? D. Do managers of places where you might be employed have similar responsibilities as a king? E. Write a paragraph explanation of what you think makes a good boss and a bad boss.

45  SWBAT to develop ideas about what books to read.  We are going to the library in a few minutes. You will quickly find something to read and check it out. We are not spending more than twenty minutes in the library, so use your time wisely. A. What kind of book do you think you will look for? OR What kind of book will you look at but not actually check out from the library?

46  What is our role in society? What responsibilities do we have to our family, friends, neighbors, fellow citizens? B. Why do we have rules? C. Do people know how to act? Should we hold people accountable for actions that they can’t help? Should we only incarcerate, hospitalize, or otherwise restrain those who cannot control themselves? D. There are written rules for how to act, and there are unwritten rules of how to act. In what ways do you think these differ? Do these rules concern different things? Do they guide us in different behaviors?

47  SWBAT monitor their comprehension of their reading material. A. Explain why you chose the reading material you brought with you today for SSR.

48  Three rules for Sustained Silent Reading (or is it Silent Sustained Reading?) 1. You must at least act like you are reading 2. You must enjoy whatever it is you are reading 3. You may not talk—if we must move you to a different part of the room, that may be arranged  Pay attention to what you are thinking during your reading. B. How are you understanding what you are reading? C. What do you do when your mind wanders? D. What do you do when you don’t understand what you just read? E. What connections does what you are reading have to your life?

49  SWBAT draw evidence from their experience to explain their judgment of others. A. Are you a harsh judge of others, or do you tend to give others a break?  Go to your “Grant Group” (Intervention) after third today  The above reminder is as much for me as it is for you

50 B. List five behaviors you think there should be written rules against—these can be school or workplace rules, or laws governing our society. C. List five rules (See “B” for explanation) you think should be done away with. D. List a rule that you see people break regularly.  What is your reaction to the breaking of this rule?  Should there be better enforcement of this rule?

51  Your friend’s dad owns a hardware store. In the bathroom at school, you hear two employees of that store talking about how they’ve been taking merchandise from that store and selling it— essentially stealing from your friends dad. What is the right thing for you to do?  Would your answer be different if you knew the employees were exaggerating or lying?  What if you were afraid that the two who were talking might hurt you if you told on them?  What if you considered your friend’s dad a jerk?

52  SWBAT relate historical events to their own understanding.  Bell Ringer  What is “parallel construction” as that term is used in grammar?

53  Xenophobic--an unreasonable fear or hatred of foreigners or strangers or of that which is foreign or strange

54  Three rules for SSR 1. You must at least act like you are reading 2. You must enjoy whatever it is you are reading 3. You may not talk—if we must move you to a different part of the room, that may be arranged

55  SWBAT determine the meaning of the Act I scene i of Hamlet A. What has been the most difficult thing you have read? What made it so difficult? B. Think of a time when you have been successful at something (anything) and explain how you felt.  Don’t forget something to read tomorrow!

56 C. The curtain opens on what setting (time and place)? D. Why is Francisco happy to see Bernardo? E. Why has Marcellus begged Horatio to join the watch? F. What does the ghost look like? Do? Say? G. What was the outcome of the fight between King Hamlet and Fortinbras? H. Why is there a need for a nightly watch on the palace?

57  Seniors—Please give your parents the following message:  The senior parent meeting scheduled for this Thursday has been cancelled due to conflicts in the schedule. The make up date is Tuesday Sept. 20 at 6:30  SWBAT identify and apply basic grammatical elements in sentences.  Bell Ringer—Is grammar more or less boring to study than most subjects? Explain your answer We will read for 10 minutes before we jump into the grammar lesson for today.

58  Three rules for SSR 1. You must at least act like you are reading 2. You must enjoy whatever it is you are reading 3. You may not talk—if we must move you to a different part of the room, that may be arranged

59  Seniors—Please give your parents the following message:  The senior parent meeting scheduled for this Thursday has been cancelled due to conflicts in the schedule.  The make up date is Tuesday Sept. 20 at 6:30  SWBAT determine the meaning of the Act I scene ii of Hamlet  Bell Ringer— A. What do you know so far in the play? What do you think is going to happen? B. How long should someone wait after a spouse dies before he or she gets married again?  First Period! Remind me to have you vote for homecoming court and student council

60  You will have a vocabulary quiz on September 30  This will be matching words from a word bank with their definitions  All of the definitions are on this crossword puzzle  The words and definitions can be found on the following pages in your literature books:  665, 679, 691, 707  #2 down is “anatimize” that is a misspelling—I’m sorry, but you will have to know how to spell it correctly

61  Thomas Mann  I consider it a mistake to think that the author himself is the best judge of his work. He may be that while he is still at work on it and living in it. But once done, it tends to be something he has got rid of, something foreign to him; others, as time goes on, will know more and better about it than he. They can often remind him of things in it he has forgotten or indeed never quite knew.  Conversely, I will tell you:  All interpretations are not correct. Some lack evidence, some are not plausible, some offer contradictory evidence, and some just don’t have any evidence to support their stance.  Discuss for a couple of minutes what this means.

62  SWBAT determine the meaning of the Act I scene iii of Hamlet  Have the crossword puzzle completed by Tuesday, September 20.  If you lost your copy of the crossword puzzle, you can print a copy off of my website.  Bell Ringer—Be able to explain the relationship between Hamlet and Fortinbras. Also, be able to tell who are the leaders of Norway and Denmark in the play.  Get a copy of the play out of the crate in front of the room.  We’ll have SSR first, then we’ll jump into the play.

63 C. How are Claudius, the dead King Hamlet, and Queen Gertrude related? D. What is in the letter Claudius is sending to the ailing King of Norway? E. Who is Laertes? Why does he want to leave Denmark? F. Why is young Hamlet grieving? How do Claudius and Gertrude treat his grief? G. Why is the King planning a celebration? H. Who is Horatio? What does he reveal to Hamlet?

64  After reading this scene answer these questions from what we’ve read so far: 1. What do you think is important? 2. What don’t you understand? 3. What did you like and dislike, agree with and disagree with? Next week, you will get your own copy of Hamlet, and you will be responsible for reading and understanding it. Be sure you are developing your ability to read this play.

65  SWBAT explain what they can and cannot understand when reading Shakespearean verse.  Have the crossword puzzle completed by Tuesday, September 20.  If you lost your copy of the crossword puzzle, you can print a copy off of my website.  I will collect this at the beginning of class and return it to you by the end of class.  Have something to read for SSR Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday of this week  Turn in your paper work for what you want to do Wednesday tomorrow if you haven’t turned it in already. Bell Ringer– How is this play different from what you expected? If it is exactly how you thought it would be, you should become a fortune teller or a gambler.

66 1. What do you think is important? Think of “plot,” “characters,” and other ideas of drama and literature you’ve been taught. 2. What don’t you understand? Don’t simply say the language. You’ve got to show me that you’ve been paying a little bit of attention to what we’ve been doing in class. 3. What did you like and dislike, agree with and disagree with?

67 Please copy the following sentences  Instead of reading all the time, you should get out and breathe some fresh air.  You should get out and breathe some fresh air instead of reading all the time.  Between those two houses, the field was overgrown with weeds.  The field was overgrown with weeds between the two houses.  Because her mother wanted to go, Angie went to the fair.  Angie went to the fair because her mother wanted to go.  Which of these are punctuated correctly?

68  Underline the subject of the sentence  Circle the “complete” verb  You will have to know the difference between a phrase and a clause  You will have to know where to put a comma (or not) in a sentence with a clause or phrase at the beginning and where to put a comma with a clause or phrase at the end

69  SWBAT explain the use of ghosts in drama as purveyors of evil or good.  First, I will collect your crossword puzzles.  We’re going to the library for a presentation by Mrs. Wallace. We will have a short SSR session, and then we will get back to Hamlet.  In the library, please pay attention to the presentation. Be cognizant of the fact that you are not the only person in the room and someone is trying very hard to present something to you that may benefit you.  pur·vey·or (pr-vr) n. 1. One that furnishes provisions, especially food. 2. One that promulgates something: a purveyor of lies.  cog·ni·zant (kgn-znt) adj. Fully informed; conscious.  Seniors will report to the auditorium. Thanks.

70  SWBAT form a preliminary judgment as to whether the ghost of King Hamlet is good or bad.  Tomorrow, we will have a speaker from Brown Mackie College talk to you about your transition from high school to whatever you are doing next year. Bell Ringer—We are going through Hamlet in super-slow motion. Is this better or worse than going through a Shakespeare play more quickly? Explain your answer.  We’re going to have SSR and read two scenes from Hamlet today, so get ready to focus on the task at hand!

71  Three rules for SSR 1. You must at least act like you are reading 2. You must enjoy whatever it is you are reading 3. You may not talk—if we must move you to a different part of the room, that may be arranged

72 1. How does Hamlet feel about the drunken revelry? 2. What mixed feelings does Hamlet have after seeing the ghost? 3. Why doesn’t Horatio want Hamlet to follow the Ghost?

73 1. What does the Ghost tell Hamlet? 2. How does the Ghost want Hamlet to treat Claudius? Gertrude? 3. What does Hamlet make Horatio and Marcellus swear? Why?

74 SWBAT explain the hypocrisy of Polonius.  Tomorrow, we will have a speaker from Brown Mackie College talk to you about your transition from high school to whatever you are doing next year. Bell Ringer—Is it okay for parents to spy on their kids?

75 1. Why does Polonius send Reynaldo to Paris? 2. Why is Ophelia frightened by Hamlet? 3. How does Polonius explain Hamlet’s behavior? Is he right?

76  SWBAT explain more clearly how they will make the transition out of high school in to their post-secondary world.  As you listen to our guest today, consider what you are already prepared for and what you need to do to prepare for what you want to do. I will be handing out a worksheet with text from Hamlet for you to analyze. These are due next Wednesday 9/28.  If you lose your copy, you can print it off from my website  Enjoy your three day weekend! o Teachers must report Monday, so I will be even more embittered…you’ve had fair warning.


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