Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Poetry Poetry is simply a method of writing that contains a lot of information in a small package. Poetry contains elements such as meter, rhyme schemes,

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Poetry Poetry is simply a method of writing that contains a lot of information in a small package. Poetry contains elements such as meter, rhyme schemes,"— Presentation transcript:

1

2 Poetry Poetry is simply a method of writing that contains a lot of information in a small package. Poetry contains elements such as meter, rhyme schemes, imagery, quatrains, metaphors and other literary elements (see list of poetry terms).

3 Scanning or analyzing Poetry  Poetry contains specific traits that identify its structure and meaning. In order to understand the structure of a selection of poetry, it is important to remember the following steps: A line of poetry is always measured by its metric foot. The type of foot must be identified to determine the poem’s linear pattern. Some selections of poetry have rhyme and others do not. Some types of poems are ballads, some are elegies, some are apostrophes and some are dramatic monologues, etc. (see terms) A simple method for determining “feet” per line is: # of syllables/2=feet.

4 Scanning or analyzing Poetry  Learning to scan poetry can be fun if you approach poetry with the right attitude! The purpose of scanning poetry is to identify the elements that a writer incorporates in the poem’s construction. In fact, poetry is an art form that goes beyond mere rhyme and stanzas.  Before learning to scan poetry, it is important to learn some terms that will identify a poem by its rhyme, structure, line count, feet, tone and other elements and patterns.

5 Scanning or analyzing Poetry  The process for scanning poetry is as follows:  First, you must determine the number of feet per line of poetry. This step is easy because you simply count the syllables in the line and divide them by 2, # of syllables/2=feet.  Secondly, you must determine the “type” of feet that are in the poem. This can be done easily by simply identifying the first foot of the line. The three most common types of feet are: Iambic--unstressed-stressed (u-/) Trochee-- stressed-unstressed (/-u) Spondee – stressed- stressed (/-/)  In a foot are 2 syllables. The syllables will contain stressed and unstressed words or each word can be stressed.

6 Scanning or analyzing Poetry LLet’s scan the following line together! My heart leaps up when I behold a rainbow in the sky: How many feet are in the first line? 4 is correct! My heart / leaps up/ when I/ behold Now let’s put it all together.

7 My heart / leaps up/ when I/ behold Scanning or analyzing Poetry  Now, where are the stressed words?  What type of foot is the first foot of the line?  The first line is Iambic!  Now let’s put it all together.

8 My heart / leaps up/ when I/ behold Scanning or analyzing Poetry When counting the feet, we use Greek prefixes rather than 1, 2, 3, etc. 1 mono 2 di 3 tri 4 tetra 5 penta 6 hexa 7 hepta 8 octa 9 ennea 10 deca 11 hendeca 12 dodeca

9 My heart / leaps up/ when I/ behold Remember, we measure by the metric foot! Iambic + tetra (4) + meter = Iambic tetrameter! Other examples of Iambic poems: Now, let’s try another one! Scanning or analyzing Poetry

10 Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered weak and weary, Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore,  What is the number of feet?  Now, where are the stressed words?  What type of foot is the first foot of the line?  Once up/on a/ midnight/ dreary/, while I/ pondered/ weak and/weary/  Put it together now.  What do you have?  Trochaic octameter!  Other examples:

11 Poetry Types  Poems can be written in various styles and/or techniques.  Some of the types are: acrostic, ballads, lyric, blank verse, dramatic monologues, elegies, fables, epics, free verse, haikus, limericks, concrete or shaped, sonnets and more.acrostic balladslyricblank versedramatic monologueselegiesfablesepicsfree versehaikuslimericks

12 Sonnets  Sonnets are similar to stories in novels, plays and other literary formats. They have rising action, falling action and a climax.  Sonnets come in two types, Italian and English (Shakespearean). A sonnet contains 14 lines. No more or no less! Both types of sonnets contain a specific rhyme scheme.  The sonnet is one of the poetic forms that can be found in lyric poetry from Europe. The term "sonnet" derives from the Occitan word sonet and the Italian word sonetto, both meaning "little song" or "little sound".  By the thirteenth century, it had come to signify a poem of fourteen lines that follows a strict rhyme scheme and specific structure. The conventions associated with the sonnet have evolved over its history.

13 Italian sonnets (Petrarchan)  Italian sonnets (Petrarchan) contain the following traits:  14 lines  Octave: the problem is introduced in these 8 lines.  Sestet: the solution to the problem is introduced in the remaining 6 lines.  Volta: the “turn” of events for resolution. The Volta is the first word of the first line of the sestet. In many cases, the first word of the sestet will be words such as, and, but, then, when, etc. Generally the fanboys are voltas.  A rhyme scheme of abba abba for the octave (8) and any combination of cde for the sestet (6).  The meter may vary or follow a strict pattern. Most poets use pentameter or tetrameter for these types of sonnets.

14 Italian sonnets (Petrarchan)  Note the following example: How soon hath Time, the subtle thief of youth, (a) Stolen on his wing my three and twentieth year! (b) My hasting days fly on with full career, (b) But my late spring no bud or blossom shew'th. (a) Perhaps my semblance might deceive the truth, (a) That I to manhood am arrived so near, (b) And inward ripeness doth much less appear, (b) That some more timely-happy spirits endu'th. (a) Yet be it less or more, or soon or slow, (c) It shall be still in strictest measure even (d) To that same lot, however mean or high, (e) Toward which Time leads me, and the will of Heaven; (c) All is, if I have grace to use it so, (d) As ever in my great Taskmaster's eye. (e)

15 English or Shakespearean Sonnets  English or Shakespearean Sonnets contain the following traits:  14 lines.  12 lines contain the conflict and the remaining 2 lines contain the solution.  These types of sonnets will be iambic pentameter. On occasion they can be tetrameter.

16 English or Shakespearean Sonnets Let me not to the marriage of true minds (A) Admit impediments. Love is not love (B) Which alters when it alteration finds, (A) Or bends with the remover to remove: (B) O no! it is an ever-fixed mark (C) That looks on tempests and is never shaken; (D) It is the star to every wandering bark, (C) Whose worth's unknown, although his height be taken. (D) Love's not Time's fool, though rosy lips and cheeks (E) Within his bending sickle's compass come: (F) Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks, (E) But bears it out even to the edge of doom. (F) {Slanted Ryhme} If this be error and upon me proved, (G) I never writ, nor no man ever loved (G) {Heroic couplet} Exposition of this poem can be found at: 

17 Sonnets  Sonnets became extremely popular during 16 th and 17 th centuries. During the 16 th century, poets developed two classes or styles of sonnet writing known as the Metaphysical and Cavalier poets. Both groups have specific traits that identify their writing.  Metaphysical poets ○ Metaphysical poets, name given to a group of English lyric poets of the 17th cent. The term was first used by Samuel Johnson (1744). The hallmark of their poetry is the metaphysical conceit (a figure of speech that employs unusual and paradoxical images), a reliance on intellectual wit, learned imagery, and subtle argument. Although this method was by no means new, these men infused new life into English poetry by the freshness and originality of their approach. The most important metaphysical poets are John Donne, George Herbert, Henry Vaughan, Thomas Traherne, Abraham Cowley, Richard Crashaw, and Andrew Marvell. Their work has considerably influenced the poetry of the 20th cent.

18 Metaphysical poets  Their work was based upon their knowledge, preference or influence of:  brief and concentrated in its meaning  centered around dramatic situations  fondness for conceits  conceit: from the Italian concetto=thought  an extended metaphor  basis of comparison is surprising  aware of differences within similarity  draws on specialized areas of experience to describe love  law  medicine  philosophy  religion

19 Traits or styles for Metaphysical poets:  The final product of their work would have the following traits: Rough meter Many times the “foot” will be either spondee or trochee Use non traditional imagery, generally outrageous imagery They use conceits, (the theme is surrounded by or is based upon a metaphor, for example The Flea) Unexpected logic They manipulate abstract concepts to convey messages Microcosm (s)/ solipsism (s) Rhyme experimentation Sometimes the poem will end with a paradox or oxymoron Many times the poem will begin with a dramatic opening (i.e. The Sun Rising by John Donne) therefore; the “foot” will be spondee or trochee Generally support the Catholic Church

20 Cavalier poets The common factor that binds the cavaliers together is their use of direct and colloquial language expressive of a highly individual personality, and their enjoyment of the casual, the amateur, the affectionate poem written by the way. They are 'cavalier' in the sense, not only of being Royalists (though Waller changed sides twice), but in the sense that they distrust the over-earnest, the too intense. They accept the ideal of the Renaissance Gentleman who is at once lover, soldier, wit, man of affairs, musician, and poet, but abandon the notion of his being also a pattern of Christian chivalry. They avoid the subject of religion, apart from making one or two graceful speeches. It may all sound rather trivial, and much of it no doubt is; but the Cavaliers made one great contribution to the English Lyrical Tradition. They showed us that it was possible for poetry to celebrate the minor pleasures and sadnesses of life in such a way as to impress us with a sense of ordinary day-to-day humanity, busy about its affairs, and on the whole, enjoying them very much.”

21 Traits or styles for Cavalier poets:  These poets support the Monarchy. “King’s men”  The meter will generally be smooth, almost as if written for music.  Sometimes the poems were designed to be recited with music or converted to songs.  The poem’s structure is tighter and follows a predictable pattern (rhyme schemes, etc.).  May end with rhymed couplets.  Most poems are tetrameter and pentameter.  These poets generally use classical imagery (i.e. Christian images, Homeric and Greek images, etc.)  Light-hearted wit is employed in many works.  The poems are generally based upon physical or concrete substances, themes, etc.  Epicureanism (carpe-di-am) seize the day attitude. Live life to its fullest. Over indulgence.  Stoicism: life is governed by unalterable destiny.  Libertine: philanderer, indulgence in “worldly pleasures.”

22 Let’s take a look at various forms of poetry from the 16 th and 17 th century poets and identify them by scanning. To John Donne DONNE, the delight of Phoebus, and each Muse, Who, to thy one, all other braines refuse; Whose every work, of thy most early wit, Came forth example, and remaines so, yet; Longer a knowing, than most wits do live; And which no affection praise enough can give! To it, thy language, letters, arts, best life, Which might with halfe mankinde maintaine a strife; All which I meant to praise, and, yet, I would; But leave, because I cannot as I should!  Is this a sonnet?  What type, cavalier or metaphysical?  What is the Rhyme scheme?  Type of foot and meter?

23 Let’s take a look at various forms of poetry from the 16 th and 17 th century poets and identify them by scanning. To John Donne DONNE, the delight of Phoebus, and each Muse, Who, to thy one, all other braines refuse; Whose every work, of thy most early wit, Came forth example, and remaines so, yet; Longer a knowing, than most wits do live; And which no affection praise enough can give! To it, thy language, letters, arts, best life, Which might with halfe mankinde maintaine a strife; All which I meant to praise, and, yet, I would; But leave, because I cannot as I should! Is this a sonnet? What type, cavalier or metaphysical? What is the Rhyme scheme? Type of foot and meter? No! Cavalier. Heroic couplets: aabbccddee Iambic pentameter

24 Let’s try another! THE FLEA. MARK but this flea, and mark in this, How little that which thou deniest me is ; It suck'd me first, and now sucks thee, And in this flea our two bloods mingled be. Thou know'st that this cannot be said A sin, nor shame, nor loss of maidenhead ; Yet this enjoys before it woo, And pamper'd swells with one blood made of two ; And this, alas ! is more than we would do. O stay, three lives in one flea spare, Where we almost, yea, more than married are. This flea is you and I, and this Our marriage bed, and marriage temple is. Though parents grudge, and you, we're met, And cloister'd in these living walls of jet. Though use make you apt to kill me, Let not to that self-murder added be, And sacrilege, three sins in killing three. Cruel and sudden, hast thou since Purpled thy nail in blood of innocence? Wherein could this flea guilty be, Except in that drop which it suck'd from thee? Yet thou triumph'st, and say'st that thou Find'st not thyself nor me the weaker now. 'Tis true ; then learn how false fears be ; Just so much honour, when thou yield'st to me, Will waste, as this flea's death took life from thee

25 IIs this a sonnet? NNo! WWhat type, cavalier or metaphysical? MMetaphysical! WWhat is the Rhyme scheme? HHeroic couplets: aabbcc…. TType of foot and meter? TTrochaic tetrameter! THE FLEA. MARK but this flea, and mark in this, How little that which thou deniest me is ; It suck'd me first, and now sucks thee, And in this flea our two bloods mingled be. Thou know'st that this cannot be said A sin, nor shame, nor loss of maidenhead ; Yet this enjoys before it woo, And pamper'd swells with one blood made of two ; And this, alas ! is more than we would do. O stay, three lives in one flea spare, Where we almost, yea, more than married are. This flea is you and I, and this Our marriage bed, and marriage temple is. Though parents grudge, and you, we're met, And cloister'd in these living walls of jet. Though use make you apt to kill me, Let not to that self-murder added be, And sacrilege, three sins in killing three. Cruel and sudden, hast thou since Purpled thy nail in blood of innocence? Wherein could this flea guilty be, Except in that drop which it suck'd from thee? Yet thou triumph'st, and say'st that thou Find'st not thyself nor me the weaker now. 'Tis true ; then learn how false fears be ; Just so much honour, when thou yield'st to me, Will waste, as this flea's death took life from thee

26 Let’s try one more! My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun; Coral is far more red than her lips' red; If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun; If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head. I have seen roses damask'd, red and white, But no such roses see I in her cheeks; And in some perfumes is there more delight Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks. I love to hear her speak, yet well I know That music hath a far more pleasing sound; I grant I never saw a goddess go; My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground: And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare As any she belied with false compare. IIs this a sonnet? YYes! WWhat type? Italian, English, cavalier or metaphysical? EEnglish. WWhat is the Rhyme scheme? TType of foot and meter? IIambic pentameter WWho do you think wrote this poem? SShakespeare? WWhat clues gives the author away? GGG- Shakespeare’s trademark!

27 Now it’s time to look at a different form of poetry!

28 Let’s look at some early forms of concrete or shaped poetry. A broken ALTAR, Lord, thy servant rears, Made of a heart, and cemented with tears: Whose parts are as thy hand did frame; No workman's tool hath touched the same. A HEART alone Is such a stone, As nothing but Thy pow'r doth cut. Wherefore each part Of my hard heart Meets in this frame, To praise thy name. That if I chance to hold my peace, These stones to praise thee may not cease. O let thy blessed SACRIFICE be mine, And sanctify this ALTAR to be thine. What do you see? What makes this poem unique?

29 EASTER-WINGS.  LORD, who createdst man in wealth and store, Though foolishly he lost the same, Decaying more and more, Till he became Most poor : With thee O let me rise As larks, harmoniously, And sing this day thy victories : Then shall the fall further the flight in me. My tender age in sorrow did beginne : And still with sicknesses and shame Thou didst so punish sinne, That I became Most thinne. With thee Let me combine, And feel this day thy victorie, For, if I imp my wing on thine, Affliction shall advance the flight in me.

30 Now let’s look at some modern day concrete poetry.  FUNNEL Here is a little poem... well, maybe it's not so little, but it certainly is a poem... although, come to think of it, this doesn't really rhyme, so maybe it's not a poem either; but anyway, here it is, and as you can see, it is of course funnel shaped, and before too long, quickly comes to the point, and right at about this place down here at the end !

31 Cool Huh?  Halloween & pumpkins carved just so. Goblins and ghost, are running around town. Demons, and devils, and the witches casting spells On this here night, of all Hallow's eve the children have fun while dressing up to give you a fright. Big kids and little ones it don't make a difference, all they are after is some candy to eat. House after house bags being filled way into the night. And street after street, block after block going for candy and will this ever stop, NO. Black cats and moon light make the nights come alive, Halloween season has now come upon us. While hunted houses are raising up all over in each little town. And music is playing a deep mournful old sound. What is about this time of year, cool and crispy with leaves of all colors, corn stalks all dried and standing in bundles. On this night of the year you better watch out, try not to be scared and let out a big shout. I love this night where I can dress up and become an old creature whom I have only read about. So Happy Halloween to all and have a good fright. Boris will be happy to see you having fun, along with his departed friend igor HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HAAAAAAAA

32 Neat stuff happens when you get started! Spirits falling in puddles of grief, disappointment drowning hope, tissues soaked in sadness, umbrellas raised in futile defense, ears closed to the rain song. Eyes swollen, moist and red, fingers gripping an offered hand, feet unable to move, flowers surround, unseen by one who is unaware of the rain song. Music, soft, sweet, and low, prayers mumbled respectfully, love shared with family and friends. Memories linger, vibrant and warm as hearts beat in time with the rain song. Emptiness, loneliness yet to come, fears for tomorrow, tears for today, self-pity and doubt, anger and pain haunting and howling about in the wind unable to song hide rain from the

33 Now it’s time for you to make your own shaped poem!

34 Haiku Poetry  Haiku is a poetic form and a type of poetry from the Japanese culture. Haiku combines form, content, and language in a meaningful, yet compact form.  Haiku poets, which you will soon be, write about everyday things. Many themes include nature, feelings, or experiences.  Usually they use simple words and grammar.  The most common form for Haiku is three short lines. The first line usually contains five (5) syllables, the second line seven (7) syllables, and the third line contains five (5) syllables.  Haiku doesn't rhyme.  A Haiku must "paint" a mental image in the reader's mind.  This is the challenge of Haiku - to put the poem's meaning and imagery in the reader's mind in ONLY 17 syllables over just three (3) lines of poetry!

35 Let’s look at a few examples! The red blossom bends and drips its dew to the ground. Like a tear it falls  Do you see the nature influence?  Look at the structure.  How many syllables are in the Haiku?  Is there rhyme?  Are the words simple and understandable? The bees are buzzing. Beautiful flowers are here. The flowers smell good. Now, you analyze this Haiku and explain it to me.

36 SENRYU  A senryu is a three line Japanese poem structurally similar to haiku. It is unrhymed and the subject is based human nature. It is usually satirical or ironic. The Album old photo album memories of yesterday picture of the past Knights For noble heros, it's honour and chivalry, not shining armour. The Choice practice more evil if you have a charred black soul hell will wait for you

37 Funny Haikus! Serious error. All shortcuts have disappeared. Screen. Mind. Both are blank. Windows NT crashed. I am the Blue Screen of Death. No one hears your screams.

38 Haiga  Traditional Japanese haiga involved brush art work coupled with a haiku poem done in brush calligraphy. Like the haiku poem, the focus of haiga is in simplicity of expression.  Click here for samples! Click here for samples!

39 Digital art-haiku  Digital art-haiku is one form of modern haiga. Other forms include photo-haiku [haiku attached to a photographic image] and all modern forms of art coupled with haiku. Of course, traditional haiga is still practiced.

40 Digital art-haiku

41

42

43

44 Now, it’s your turn to write Haikus!

45

46


Download ppt "Poetry Poetry is simply a method of writing that contains a lot of information in a small package. Poetry contains elements such as meter, rhyme schemes,"

Similar presentations


Ads by Google