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MACBETH If it were done when 'tis done, then 'twere well It were done quickly: if the assassination Could trammel up the consequence, and catch With his.

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Presentation on theme: "MACBETH If it were done when 'tis done, then 'twere well It were done quickly: if the assassination Could trammel up the consequence, and catch With his."— Presentation transcript:

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2 MACBETH If it were done when 'tis done, then 'twere well It were done quickly: if the assassination Could trammel up the consequence, and catch With his surcease success ; that but this blow Might be the be-all and the end-all here, But here, upon this bank and shoal of time, We'd jump the life to come. But in these cases We still have judgment here; that we but teach Bloody instructions, which, being taught, return To plague the inventor: this even-handed justice Commends the ingredients of our poison'd chalice To our own lips. He's here in double trust; First, as I am his kinsman and his subject, Impartial Metaphor metaphor Alliteration Sibilance Personification Death, all that is to be and what completes everything Personification Risky, taking life as it comes Idiom, what goes around comes around, and thus foreboding Diction, showing how messy and gruesome the deed is. metaphor Monosyllables Bringing trouble upon them selves Repetition of the dictions shows he wants it to be over fast and wishes it were done immediately Rationality

3 Strong both against the deed; then, as his host, Who should against his murderer shut the door, Not bear the knife myself. Besides, this Duncan Hath borne his faculties so meek, hath been So clear in his great office, that his virtues Will plead like angels, trumpet-tongued, against The deep damnation of his taking-off; And pity, like a naked new-born babe, Striding the blast, or heaven's cherubin, horsed Upon the sightless couriers of the air, Shall blow the horrid deed in every eye, That tears shall drown the wind. I have no spur To prick the sides of my intent, but only Vaulting ambition, which o'erleaps itself And falls on the other. Both strong arguments. Alliteration He should be the protector, not the traitor. Listing- shows Duncan’s qualities/traits-could be used to create pathos. Personification- his merits/deeds will mourn his death. Duncan was such a pious and noble man that his deeds will still have an effect on him, even after life ends. Diction- incorrupt, free of error. Simile, religious diction,& Irony-Angels do not need to plead to people (god gives them commands), thus Shakespeare gives Duncan a ‘god-like’ superiority. Angels, and in turn God, are mourning Duncan’s death. ‘Trumpet-tongued’ suggests that the off-tune trumpets will signal Duncan’s atrocious murder. Euphemism-Death Personification & Simile-He will pity Duncan, the same way a person would pity a crying new born, hence relaying Duncan’s innocence. He will want to cradle pity. Metaphor & Pathetic Fallacy- An abundance of mourning shall wash away the sinister, cold, chilly, wind. He will fall over the hurdles, and he knows this, but his ambition, narcissism, etc. is fueling him. Metaphor- Angles will be crying so much, their voices will become hoarse. Metaphor- The Angels will punish those who committed the evil crime. Metaphor & Irony– Embracing the Sounds of the Angels which depicts that he has some sort of faith


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