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FRONT ShannonAlex Y.SpencerAdrianLivijaMichael JuliaChadJohnLuisSamAndrea DuncanThomas D. CalebChrisEthanJoe Thomas B. KatieWill M-MKeeganAlex F.Will M.

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Presentation on theme: "FRONT ShannonAlex Y.SpencerAdrianLivijaMichael JuliaChadJohnLuisSamAndrea DuncanThomas D. CalebChrisEthanJoe Thomas B. KatieWill M-MKeeganAlex F.Will M."— Presentation transcript:

1 FRONT ShannonAlex Y.SpencerAdrianLivijaMichael JuliaChadJohnLuisSamAndrea DuncanThomas D. CalebChrisEthanJoe Thomas B. KatieWill M-MKeeganAlex F.Will M. xxxWill G.JacobSadie Poetry – Introduction to the sonnet

2 Understanding accent   Don’t put the emphasis on the wrong syllable

3 Using meter   Explanation of meter Explanation of meter   What is the meter of your last name?   Think:   How would you pronounce it clearly to someone who is learning it from the first time?

4 Sample sonnet Sonnet 18 Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer's lease hath all too short a date: Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, And often is his gold complexion dimmed, And every fair from fair sometime declines, By chance, or nature's changing course untrimmed: But thy eternal summer shall not fade, Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st, Nor shall death brag thou wander'st in his shade, When in eternal lines to time thou grow'st, So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see, So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.

5 A sonnet is…   a lyric poem   consisting of fourteen lines   written in iambic pentameter   with a definite rhyme scheme   and a definite thought structure   A lyric poem deals with emotions, feelings   Iambic pentameter consists of   five measures, units, or meters, of iambs

6 An iamb is a metrical foot consisting of an unaccented syllable U followed by an accented syllable /.

7 U / U / U / U / U /   One day I wrote her name u pon the strand, U / U / U / U / U /   But came the waves and wash ed it a way: U / U / U / U / U /   A gain I wrote it with a sec ond hand, U / U / U / U / U /   But came the tide, and made my pains his prey   Edmund Spenser, Amoretti, Sonnet

8 Rhyme scheme   Petrarchan (Italian) rime scheme: abba, abba, cd, cd, cd abba, abba, cde, cde   Shakespearean (English, or Elizabethan) rime scheme: abab, cdcd, efef, gg

9 Shakespeare’s Sonnet 18 Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer's lease hath all too short a date: Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, And often is his gold complexion dimmed, And every fair from fair sometime declines, By chance, or nature's changing course untrimmed: But thy eternal summer shall not fade, Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st, Nor shall death brag thou wander'st in his shade, When in eternal lines to time thou grow'st, So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see, So long lives this, and this gives life to thee. A B A B C d C D E F E F G G

10 Thought structure   Octave/ sestet   The octave, eight lines, presents a situation or idea.   The sestet (sextet), six lines, responds, to the situation or idea in the octave.   Quatrain, quatrain, quatrain, couplet   Each quatrain, four lines, describes and idea or situation which leads to a conclusion or response in the couplet, two lines.

11 Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer's lease hath all too short a date: Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, And often is his gold complexion dimmed, And every fair from fair sometime declines, By chance, or nature's changing course untrimmed: But thy eternal summer shall not fade, Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st, Nor shall death brag thou wander'st in his shade, When in eternal lines to time thou grow'st, So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see, So long lives this, and this gives life to thee. The octave describes the ways in which the summer’s day is inferior to the beloved. The sestet describes the ways in which the beloved is superior to the summer’s day. Sonnet 18

12 Sonnet 29 When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes I all alone between my outcast state, And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries, And look upon myself, and curse my fate, Wishing me like to one more rich in hope, Featured like him, like him with friends possessed, Desiring this man's art, and that man's scope, With what I most enjoy contented least; Yet in these thoughts my self almost despising, Haply I think on thee, and then my state, Like to the lark at break of day arising From sullen earth, sings hymns at heaven's gate; For thy sweet love remembered such wealth brings That then I scorn to change my state with kings. The diction of the octave implies the speaker’s self-pity and depression. The sestet’s diction, in conrast, is joyful.

13 Rude or reality? Sonnet 130 My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun; Coral is far more red than her lips' red; If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun; If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head. I have seen roses damask'd, red and white, But no such roses see I in her cheeks; And in some perfumes is there more delight Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks. I love to hear her speak, yet well I know That music hath a far more pleasing sound; I grant I never saw a goddess go; My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground: And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare As any she belied with false compare.

14 Holy Sonnet 10

15   Original version of Holy Sonnet 10   Different punctuation   No semi colon, and no capital D   This portrays death as nothing more than a pause, a comma   Nothing more than a breath   Not a grand, dramatic event to be shouted about with capital letters What’s in a comma?

16   Does the speaker truly have the confidence that is conveyed, or is he convincing himself that he is not afraid of death?   If you have to pick out the one most effective argument in the poem, which one would it be?   Does the comparison between death and sleep make sense outside of a theological context? Is the speaker justified in thinking that death will bring pleasure?   Do you think it’s truly possible to welcome the experience of death in the way that the poem seems to suggest? Or, is everyone afraid of death, and some people just pretend not to be? Study questions


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