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Literary Response and Analysis 3.1 Articulate the relationship between the expressed purpose and the characteristics of different forms of dramatic literature.

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Presentation on theme: "Literary Response and Analysis 3.1 Articulate the relationship between the expressed purpose and the characteristics of different forms of dramatic literature."— Presentation transcript:

1 Literary Response and Analysis 3.1 Articulate the relationship between the expressed purpose and the characteristics of different forms of dramatic literature (for example, comedy, tragedy, drama, dramatic monologue) Dramatic Literature

2 The literary response and analysis section of the CAHSEE contains 20 multiple choice questions. There are two questions on the CAHSEE that ask questions regarding your understanding of standard 3.1 Number of Questions

3 Purpose Types of Drama  Comedy  Tragedy Types of Drama  Comedy  Tragedy Elements of Drama  Monologue  Aside  Dialogue

4 Identifying Parts On the High School Exit Exam you will be asked to read a passage and identify its type--comedy or tragedy--then relate how the passage contributes to an overall theme.

5 Reading the Excerpt The CAHSEE will give you a small section of a play to read. It’s your job to decide what type of play it is and specific dramatic elements it reveals. The CAHSEE will give you a small section of a play to read. It’s your job to decide what type of play it is and specific dramatic elements it reveals.

6 Comedy: A Type of Drama  A less serious kind of drama than Tragedy.  It is not always funny, nor do situations always end happily, but Comedy is lighter.  The end is brighter in Comedy than in Tragedy.  Comedy often comments about society and the lighter side of our lives.  Comedy often deals with complications of mistaken identity and misunderstandings.  A less serious kind of drama than Tragedy.  It is not always funny, nor do situations always end happily, but Comedy is lighter.  The end is brighter in Comedy than in Tragedy.  Comedy often comments about society and the lighter side of our lives.  Comedy often deals with complications of mistaken identity and misunderstandings.

7 Tragedy: A Type of Drama  Tragedy is, above all, serious in tone and importance.  Tragedy tells of the fall of a worthwhile, noble character.  Tragedy focuses on a hero or heroine whose potential is great but who is defeated by something out of his or her control.  Tragedy is, above all, serious in tone and importance.  Tragedy tells of the fall of a worthwhile, noble character.  Tragedy focuses on a hero or heroine whose potential is great but who is defeated by something out of his or her control.

8 Monologue: An Element of Drama  an unusually long dramatic speech by a single actor  usually happens at an important part of the play  an unusually long dramatic speech by a single actor  usually happens at an important part of the play

9 Aside: An Element of Drama An aside is directed to the audience and is not supposed to be heard by other actors on stage. It will be indicated in the stage directions [aside]. Note: an aside only happens in a play. Example-- Adam: [aside] I can’t believe she just did that! An aside is directed to the audience and is not supposed to be heard by other actors on stage. It will be indicated in the stage directions [aside]. Note: an aside only happens in a play. Example-- Adam: [aside] I can’t believe she just did that!

10 Dialogue: An Element of Drama  A play relies heavily on dialogue-- conversations between characters.  The readers learn about what is happening through dialogue and actions in the play.  A play relies heavily on dialogue-- conversations between characters.  The readers learn about what is happening through dialogue and actions in the play.

11 Example Text Romeo: Father, what news? what is the prince’s doom? What sorrow craves acquaintance at my hand, /That I yet know not? Fri. Laurence: Too familiar / Is my dear son with such sour company: I bring thee tidings of the prince’s doom. Rom. What less than doomsday is the prince’s doom? Fri. L. A gentler judgment vanish’d from his lips, Not body’s death, but body’s banishment. Rom. Ha! banishment! be merciful, say ‘death;’ For exile hath more terror in his look, Much more than death: do not say ‘banishment.’ Taken from Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare Romeo: Father, what news? what is the prince’s doom? What sorrow craves acquaintance at my hand, /That I yet know not? Fri. Laurence: Too familiar / Is my dear son with such sour company: I bring thee tidings of the prince’s doom. Rom. What less than doomsday is the prince’s doom? Fri. L. A gentler judgment vanish’d from his lips, Not body’s death, but body’s banishment. Rom. Ha! banishment! be merciful, say ‘death;’ For exile hath more terror in his look, Much more than death: do not say ‘banishment.’ Taken from Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare

12 Example Text Romeo: What less than doomsday is the Prince’s doom? Friar Lawrence: Too familiar Is my dear son with such sour company. I bring the tidings of the Prince’s doom. Romeo: What less than doomsday is the prince’s doom? Friar Lawrence: A gentler judgment vanished from his lips: Not body’s death, but body’s banishment. Romeo: Ha, banishment? Be more merciful, say, “death”; For exile hath more terror in his look, much more than death. Do not say “banishment.” Taken from Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare Romeo: What less than doomsday is the Prince’s doom? Friar Lawrence: Too familiar Is my dear son with such sour company. I bring the tidings of the Prince’s doom. Romeo: What less than doomsday is the prince’s doom? Friar Lawrence: A gentler judgment vanished from his lips: Not body’s death, but body’s banishment. Romeo: Ha, banishment? Be more merciful, say, “death”; For exile hath more terror in his look, much more than death. Do not say “banishment.” Taken from Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare Notice no stage directions Not one character speaks for a long time The question will not ask you the type of Play.

13 Example Question This passage consists mainly of___________ a. monologue b. dialogue c. stage directions d. comedy This passage consists mainly of___________ a. monologue b. dialogue c. stage directions d. comedy


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