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Key Facts Author- William Shakespeare Author- William Shakespeare Type of work- play Type of work- play Genre-Romantic comedy Genre-Romantic comedy.

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Presentation on theme: "Key Facts Author- William Shakespeare Author- William Shakespeare Type of work- play Type of work- play Genre-Romantic comedy Genre-Romantic comedy."— Presentation transcript:

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3 Key Facts Author- William Shakespeare Author- William Shakespeare Type of work- play Type of work- play Genre-Romantic comedy Genre-Romantic comedy Time and place written- Around 1592 London Time and place written- Around 1592 London Date publish 1623 Date publish 1623

4 Key facts cont. Major conflict - Petruccio's attempt to "tame" Katherine. Major conflict - Petruccio's attempt to "tame" Katherine. Rising action - Petruccio and Katherine's early verbal conflicts. Rising action - Petruccio and Katherine's early verbal conflicts. Climax - There is no single moment of intense action in the play, but It might be possible to see a climax in the wedding scene in Act III, or in Katherine's decision in Act IV to submit to Petruccio when he says the sun is really the moon, or her agreement to throw shame to the winds and kiss him in the middle of the street in Act IV. Climax - There is no single moment of intense action in the play, but It might be possible to see a climax in the wedding scene in Act III, or in Katherine's decision in Act IV to submit to Petruccio when he says the sun is really the moon, or her agreement to throw shame to the winds and kiss him in the middle of the street in Act IV. Falling action - The banquet at Lucentio's house in Act V, scene ii Falling action - The banquet at Lucentio's house in Act V, scene ii Themes - Marriage as an economic institution, the effect of social roles on individual happiness Themes - Marriage as an economic institution, the effect of social roles on individual happiness

5 History from 1592 to Shakespeare writes “The Tempest” 1611 Shakespeare writes “The Tempest” Thirty years’ War between German Catholics and Protestants Thirty years’ War between German Catholics and Protestants

6 8 Quotes Signor Hortensio, 'twixt such friends as we Few words suffice; and therefore, if thou know One rich enough to be Petruccio's wife— As wealth is burden of my wooing dance— Be she as foul as was Florentius' love, As old as Sibyl, and as curst and shrewd As Socrates' Xanthippe or a worse, She moves me not—or not removes at least Affection's edge in me, were she as rough As are the swelling Adriatic seas. I come to wive it wealthily in Padua; If wealthily, then happily in Padua. (I.ii.62–73) Signor Hortensio, 'twixt such friends as we Few words suffice; and therefore, if thou know One rich enough to be Petruccio's wife— As wealth is burden of my wooing dance— Be she as foul as was Florentius' love, As old as Sibyl, and as curst and shrewd As Socrates' Xanthippe or a worse, She moves me not—or not removes at least Affection's edge in me, were she as rough As are the swelling Adriatic seas. I come to wive it wealthily in Padua; If wealthily, then happily in Padua. (I.ii.62–73)

7 8 Quotes cont. Petruccio: Come, come, you wasp, i' faith you are too an gry. Katherine: If I be waspish, best beware my sting. Petruccio: My remedy is then to pluck it out. Katherine: Ay, if the fool could find where it lies. Petruccio: Who knows not where a wasp does wear his s ting? In his tail. Katherine: In his tongue. Petruccio: Whose tongue? Katherine: Yours, if you talk of tales, and so farewell. Petruccio: What, with my tongue in your tail? Petruccio: Come, come, you wasp, i' faith you are too an gry. Katherine: If I be waspish, best beware my sting. Petruccio: My remedy is then to pluck it out. Katherine: Ay, if the fool could find where it lies. Petruccio: Who knows not where a wasp does wear his s ting? In his tail. Katherine: In his tongue. Petruccio: Whose tongue? Katherine: Yours, if you talk of tales, and so farewell. Petruccio: What, with my tongue in your tail?

8 8 Quotes cont. Thus in plain terms: your father hath consented That you shall be my wife, your dowry 'greed on, And will you, nill you, I will marry you. Now Kate, I am a husband for your turn, For by this light, whereby I see thy beauty— Thy beauty that doth make me like thee well— Thou must be married to no man but me, For I am he am born to tame you, Kate, And bring you from a wild Kate to a Kate Conformable as other household Kates. Here comes your father. Never make denial. I must and will have Katherine to my wife. (II.i.261–272) Thus in plain terms: your father hath consented That you shall be my wife, your dowry 'greed on, And will you, nill you, I will marry you. Now Kate, I am a husband for your turn, For by this light, whereby I see thy beauty— Thy beauty that doth make me like thee well— Thou must be married to no man but me, For I am he am born to tame you, Kate, And bring you from a wild Kate to a Kate Conformable as other household Kates. Here comes your father. Never make denial. I must and will have Katherine to my wife. (II.i.261–272)

9 8 Quotes cont. Then God be blessed, it is the blessed sun, But sun it is not when you say it is not, And the moon changes even as your mind. What you will have it named, even that it is, And so it shall be still for Katherine. (IV.vi.19–23) Then God be blessed, it is the blessed sun, But sun it is not when you say it is not, And the moon changes even as your mind. What you will have it named, even that it is, And so it shall be still for Katherine. (IV.vi.19–23)

10 8 Quotes cont. Thy husband is thy lord, thy life, thy keeper, Thy head, thy sovereign, one that cares for thee, And for thy maintenance commits his body To painful labour both by sea and land, To watch the night in storms, the day in cold, Whilst thou liest warm at home, secure and safe, And craves no other tribute at thy hands But love, fair looks, and true obedience, Too little payment for so great a debt. … My mind hath been as big as one of yours, My heart as great, my reason haply more, To bandy word for word and frown for frown; But now I see our lances are but straws, Our strength as weak, our weakness past compare, That seeming to be most which we indeed least are. Then vail your stomachs, for it is no boot, And place your hands below your husband's foot, In token of which duty, if he please, My hand is ready, may it do him ease. (V.ii.140–183) Thy husband is thy lord, thy life, thy keeper, Thy head, thy sovereign, one that cares for thee, And for thy maintenance commits his body To painful labour both by sea and land, To watch the night in storms, the day in cold, Whilst thou liest warm at home, secure and safe, And craves no other tribute at thy hands But love, fair looks, and true obedience, Too little payment for so great a debt. … My mind hath been as big as one of yours, My heart as great, my reason haply more, To bandy word for word and frown for frown; But now I see our lances are but straws, Our strength as weak, our weakness past compare, That seeming to be most which we indeed least are. Then vail your stomachs, for it is no boot, And place your hands below your husband's foot, In token of which duty, if he please, My hand is ready, may it do him ease. (V.ii.140–183)

11 8 Quotes cont. "Is this not well? Come, my sweet Kate. / Better once than never, for never too late" (V.i.130– 131). "Is this not well? Come, my sweet Kate. / Better once than never, for never too late" (V.i.130– 131). Why are our bodies soft, and weak, and smooth … But that our soft conditions and our hearts Should well agree with our external parts? (V.ii.169–172) Why are our bodies soft, and weak, and smooth … But that our soft conditions and our hearts Should well agree with our external parts? (V.ii.169–172) "We three are married, but you two are sped" (V.ii.189). "We three are married, but you two are sped" (V.ii.189).

12 Characters list Katherine or Kate- The “shrew” in the book’s title, daughter of Batista Minola with who she lives with in Padua. Katherine or Kate- The “shrew” in the book’s title, daughter of Batista Minola with who she lives with in Padua. Petruccio- In hunt for a rich girl for him to marry and finds Kate and says she the perfect match even doe they warn him of her shrewish ness. Petruccio- In hunt for a rich girl for him to marry and finds Kate and says she the perfect match even doe they warn him of her shrewish ness.

13 Character list cont. Bianca- The younger daughter of Batista and he wont let her wed till Kate does. Bianca- The younger daughter of Batista and he wont let her wed till Kate does. Batista Minola- one of the wealthiest men in Padua. His daugthers are a big prey for the dowries he can offer. Batista Minola- one of the wealthiest men in Padua. His daugthers are a big prey for the dowries he can offer. Lucentio - A young student from Pisa, Lucentio comes to Padua to study at the city's renowned university, but he is immediately sidetracked when he falls in love with Bianca at first sight. By disguising himself as a classics instructor named Cambio, he convinces Gremio to offer him to Baptista as a tutor for Bianca. He wins her love, but his impersonation gets him into trouble when his father, Vincentio, visits Padua. Lucentio - A young student from Pisa, Lucentio comes to Padua to study at the city's renowned university, but he is immediately sidetracked when he falls in love with Bianca at first sight. By disguising himself as a classics instructor named Cambio, he convinces Gremio to offer him to Baptista as a tutor for Bianca. He wins her love, but his impersonation gets him into trouble when his father, Vincentio, visits Padua.

14 Characters cont Tranio - Lucentio's servant. Tranio accompanies Lucentio from Pisa he bargains with Baptista for Bianca's hand. Tranio - Lucentio's servant. Tranio accompanies Lucentio from Pisa he bargains with Baptista for Bianca's hand. Gremio and Hortensio - Two gentlemen of Padua. Gremio and Hortensio are Bianca's suitors at the beginning of the play. Though they are rivals, these older men also become friends during their mutual frustration with and rejection by Bianca. Hortensio directs Petruccio to Kate and then dresses up as a music instructor to court Bianca. He and Gremio are both restain in their efforts by Lucentio. Hortensio ends up marrying a widow. Gremio and Hortensio - Two gentlemen of Padua. Gremio and Hortensio are Bianca's suitors at the beginning of the play. Though they are rivals, these older men also become friends during their mutual frustration with and rejection by Bianca. Hortensio directs Petruccio to Kate and then dresses up as a music instructor to court Bianca. He and Gremio are both restain in their efforts by Lucentio. Hortensio ends up marrying a widow.

15 Character’s cont Grumio - Petruccio's servant and the dork of the play Grumio - Petruccio's servant and the dork of the play Biondello - Lucentio's second servant, who assists his master and Tranio in carrying out their plot. Biondello - Lucentio's second servant, who assists his master and Tranio in carrying out their plot. Christopher Sly - The principal character in the play's brief Induction, Sly is a drunken tinker, tricked by a mischievous nobleman into thinking that he is really a lord. Christopher Sly - The principal character in the play's brief Induction, Sly is a drunken tinker, tricked by a mischievous nobleman into thinking that he is really a lord.

16 S.C. Literati Critic The Taming of the Shrew is a good book. It’s a good book because it keeps you entertained from start to finish. In the beginning with the trick played on Christopher Sly and in the end with Kate’s and Petruccio’s hustle. The book make you believe that Kate and Petruccio hustle the others of their money because Lucentio implies that Kate, in the end, allowed herself to be tamed Quote "'Tis a wonder, by your leave, she will be tamed so" (V.ii.193). Perhaps Lucentio implies that Kate and Petruccio planned the wager, and that they worked as a team to dupe the others out of their money. In this book you find out the power of disguises. Although this book implies that a person could be change due to some taming. I believe him because white settlers tamed their slaves to be loyal just like in the book Kate is tamed to be loyal. However in this story the induction plays an important role in the story because he compares Christopher Sly to Kate. Shakespeare forces us to question whether the clothing actually does influence the person within. For example he compare her with Christopher Sly because he is made believe to be a lord by the way they dress him and he acts differently because people listen to him and he has some power. Is it the same today do your peers give to some amount of respect by the way you are dress? Do you feel better about yourself when your dress nice? Maybe Shakespeare was right your clothes do influence how you feel about your self.


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