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2012 Election Advocacy and the HIV/AIDS Community Pete Subkoviak AIDS Foundation of Chicago Charles Stephens AIDS United

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Presentation on theme: "2012 Election Advocacy and the HIV/AIDS Community Pete Subkoviak AIDS Foundation of Chicago Charles Stephens AIDS United"— Presentation transcript:

1 2012 Election Advocacy and the HIV/AIDS Community Pete Subkoviak AIDS Foundation of Chicago Charles Stephens AIDS United

2 First a bit of Housekeeping All attendees are in listen-only mode During Q & A segments ▫ Everyone can ask questions using the chat feature. ▫ If you are using the phone: Use the ‘Raise Hand’ button if you want to ask a question and you will be unmuted and called upon. Recording and presentation will be available at website

3 Raise your Hand or Use the Question Feature to Ask Questions

4 2012 Election Advocacy HIV Med Access Campaign What’s at Stake? The Rules: Do’s and Don’t’s Bird-Dogging Voter Mobilization HMAC Elections Toolkit

5 The HIV Med Access Campaign is a national project that: seeks to reframe the national conversation around HIV/AIDS treatment and care access, especially within the 2012 elections engages advocates around a range of programs related to health care access for people with HIV advances HIV treatment expansion as critical to the nation’s fiscal and public health goals is not possible with the support of MAC AIDS Fund

6 Increase the awareness and importance of HIV/AIDS in the 2012 election cycle by: ▫ Getting candidates on record on pressing HIV/AIDS issues ▫ Getting media attention on HIV/AIDS issues during the election season One of HMAC’s Goals

7 HIV Med Access Campaign Partners Pete Subkoviak, Sarah Sobel, (Ohio AIDS Foundation of Chicago – Midwest Caressa Cameron, – Charles Stephens, - AIDS United – Mid-Atlantic and South John Hellman, Latino Commission on AIDS – Latino community Ryan Clary, Project Inform – Northwest

8 What’s at Stake 113 th Congress: Jan –Jan Next Administration: Jan – Jan Ryan White Program reauthorization Affordable Care Act implementation Appropriations under the Budget Control Act National HIV/AIDS Strategy implementation Possible Supreme Court vacancy

9 You, as an individual, can do or say anything you want, on your own time and dime If you are working in conjunction with a non-profit (501 (c) 3) then all activities must be nonpartisan This includes all planning, coordination and resources used for advocacy You cannot support or oppose a candidate or party You cannot endorse candidates, or provide in-kind or financial support for candidates or political parties Your non-profit status is at stake! Rules for Election Advocacy

10 DO Encourage participation in the civic process Educate your community on ways to register and vote Remind them that they have a voice DON’T Wear or say anything that promotes a candidate or party Tell voters who to vote for Connect voting with an issue (don’t say: “vote for AIDS”) IMPORTANT: YOU CAN DO ALL THIS ON YOUR OWN TIME AS A PRIVATE CITIZEN Do’s and Don’ts

11 Do’s and Don’ts: Examples LegalIllegal We support Bill 123 which would increase funding for ADAP Do you support Bill 123? You should sign up to vote – here’s how Do you know where the candidates stand on AIDS issues? Vote for AIDS in 2012 Support Romney in 2012! Republicans boo, vote Democrat! You should sign up to vote and then vote for me

12 Bird-Dogging: Not as scary as it looks

13 What is Bird-Dogging? Bird-dogging is a tactic activists use to demand answers from politicians in a public setting. Simply put, bird-dogging involves attending a public event and asking politicians questions. This tactic can help bring media attention to your issue and inspire elected officials to commit to new policies. Bird-dogging is a tactic activists use to demand answers from politicians in a public setting. Simply put, bird-dogging involves attending a public event and asking politicians questions. This tactic can help bring media attention to your issue and inspire elected officials to commit to new policies.

14 1. Find an event 2. Gather some friends3. Make a plan 4. Get good seats 5. Get your hands up first, fast, and high Get a handshake (and a photo or autograph)–and an answer! Get quoted Bird-Dogging Steps

15 Finding an event You can learn about upcoming events by getting on the party or candidate’s lists. Once you find an event, ask the organizer for details— when the doors open, if you need tickets, and if there is a question period.

16 Gather Friends Bringing along a few friends who share in your cause and are willing to ask questions will strengthen not only your efforts, but also your confidence. The more people, the more likely it is that at least one of your questions will get answered.

17 Make a Plan Write your questions in advance! Make it personal by sharing your own story—what has inspired you to take on this cause? Make a clear ask—if you have identified a problem, what is the solution and how can this person enact change? Make it easy for them to say yes—it is a simple, moral obligation. Practice your questions with a friend who will act as the politician or a devil’s advocate.

18 Get Good Seats If you are in a group, spread out—do not all sit together. Arrive early so you can try to get a seat near the front.

19 First, Fast, High As soon as there is an opportunity for questions, get your hand up first, fast and high!

20 Get a Handshake Candidates often walk through the crowd giving handshakes. This provides additional opportunity to engage in conversation, so get in line! When you shake hands, ask your question. You’ll only have a few seconds, so make it quick and to the point. If you have the chance, get a picture or an autograph to spend more time talking with this politician.

21 Get Quoted After the event, talk to the press to get them to cover your questions and the politician’s statements. Prepare your messaging ahead of time. Have different people in your group talk with different people in the media. Keep your messaging on target and no matter what a reporter asks you, redirect it to your specific cause.

22 Remember… Bird-dogging is not about attacking an elected official or candidate. You will not make you or your cause look good if you do that. Before asking anything of a politician, make sure you research his or her stance on the issue. All that being said, elected officials work for us, and it is our responsibility to ask for the change we want.

23 Follow Up Introduce yourself to the candidate’s staff. Ask for their business card and follow up with them after the meeting about the issue you spoke about. Be Persistent. Send an . Make a phone call. Schedule an in-person meeting with the elected official. Get to multiple meetings. Create an ongoing and unwavering presence in multiple locations throughout the state

24 State and Regional Action Planning to Mobilize Voters Charles Stephens AIDS United

25 What IS Voter Mobilization? Voter registration Voter education Get out the vote effort

26 Tips for Successful Voter Mobilization Learn the rules ▫ Go to your Secretary of State’s website ▫ Voter registration deadlines ▫ Submission requirements ▫ Rules for people with criminal records Make a plan with realistic and attainable goals including ▫ Number of people you want to register, get to the polls ▫ Number of partners you plan to engage Assess internal/external resources: ▫ Existing efforts ▫ Staff & volunteers ▫ Peer educators ▫ Registration opportunities (intake, support groups, health fairs, etc.) Learn the rules ▫ Go to your Secretary of State’s website ▫ Voter registration deadlines ▫ Submission requirements ▫ Rules for people with criminal records Make a plan with realistic and attainable goals including ▫ Number of people you want to register, get to the polls ▫ Number of partners you plan to engage Assess internal/external resources: ▫ Existing efforts ▫ Staff & volunteers ▫ Peer educators ▫ Registration opportunities (intake, support groups, health fairs, etc.)

27 Tips for Successful Voter Mobilization Get the materials you need ▫ Info on issues ▫ Voter registration cards ▫ Federal Election Commission ▫ Your Secretary of State’s website ▫ AIDS Vote Identify your target universe of to register ▫ Clients, staff, volunteers, residents, etc. ▫ Who else? Go to where the people they are, but start with your base ▫ Your agency ▫ Planning council meetings ▫ Community events Get the materials you need ▫ Info on issues ▫ Voter registration cards ▫ Federal Election Commission ▫ Your Secretary of State’s website ▫ AIDS Vote Identify your target universe of to register ▫ Clients, staff, volunteers, residents, etc. ▫ Who else? Go to where the people they are, but start with your base ▫ Your agency ▫ Planning council meetings ▫ Community events

28 Tips for Successful Voter Mobilization Make it fun and easy ▫ Create a voter registration station at your agency ▫ Work with staff to integrate registration into encounters with clients ▫ Organize volunteers to register voters at agency/community events ▫ Identify registration captains Organize educational forums for staff, clients, board members, and volunteers about key issues Notify your network of important dates through , phone calls, and social media ▫ Registration deadline and election day! Attend candidate forums and raise HIV/AIDS issues Make it fun and easy ▫ Create a voter registration station at your agency ▫ Work with staff to integrate registration into encounters with clients ▫ Organize volunteers to register voters at agency/community events ▫ Identify registration captains Organize educational forums for staff, clients, board members, and volunteers about key issues Notify your network of important dates through , phone calls, and social media ▫ Registration deadline and election day! Attend candidate forums and raise HIV/AIDS issues

29 Let’s Get Out the Vote! Organize carpools ▫ Use agency vehicles ▫ Collaborate with faith partners or other organizations that are organizing rides to the polls Get the word out ▫ Phone calls ▫ Fliers ▫ Facebook ▫ Twitter Cast YOUR vote! Organize carpools ▫ Use agency vehicles ▫ Collaborate with faith partners or other organizations that are organizing rides to the polls Get the word out ▫ Phone calls ▫ Fliers ▫ Facebook ▫ Twitter Cast YOUR vote!

30

31 The HMAC Elections Toolkit HIVHealthReform.org/HIVMedAccess

32 The HMAC Elections Toolkit Elections Advocacy Power Point Questions for candidates with talking points Telling your story worksheet Do’s and Don’ts fact sheet Voter mobilization assessment

33 2012 Election Advocacy HIV Med Access Campaign The Rules: Do’s and Don’t’s Our Goal Two HIV/AIDS Questions for Congressional and Presidential Candidates MessagingBird Dogging Voter Mobilization 1.HMAC Election Advocacy Power Point

34 Elections Advocacy Power Point ▫ Do’s and Don’ts for Non-Profits ▫ Questions to ask candidates for federal office ▫ Messaging:  for public events and getting heard by the media ▫ Bird-dogging ▫ Voter Mobilization 1.HMAC Election Advocacy Power Point

35 2. Questions for Candidates

36 Two questions, along with talking points, for Congressional and Presidential candidates on HIV funding and ADAP ▫ Print it out and use in town hall forums and other candidate events ▫ Add your own personal story for greater impact 2. Questions for Candidates

37 Other Questions to Ask Do you support full implementation of the Affordable Care Act, which will transform the fight against HIV/AIDS? Will you commit to protect funding for Medicaid and Medicare, two programs that are vital to people living with HIV? HIV/AIDS disproportionately affects certain minority populations, particularly African Americans, Latinos, youth and men who have sex with men. What will you do to address these health disparities? I’m uninsured, and have a pre-existing condition. In 2014 I will qualify for Medicaid but I need coverage now. What should Congress do to help people like me today?

38 3. Telling Your Story Worksheet

39 Use the worksheet to figure out what issue you want to focus on and how it affects you and your community ▫ Helps you focus on how a “policy” (ex. funding for Ryan White programs) has affected you, your clients, and the community ▫ Helps create a clear message to make the candidate and greater public understand why these issues are impact your region 3. Telling Your Story Worksheet

40 4. Do’s and Don’ts for NPOs

41 Handy reference for 501(c)3 organizations to know what election activities they may engage in Bottom line: Keep it issue based. NPO’s may support positions (ex. Funding for ADAP) but may not support, oppose or show favoritism to any candidate or political party. 4. Do’s and Don’ts for NPOs

42 5. Voter Mobilization Assessment

43 Helps groups assess: ▫ Their goals for mobilization ▫ Their resources/capacity for voter mobilization ▫ What actions might be most strategic to engage in ▫ Action steps to achieve outcomes 5. Voter Mobilization Assessment

44

45 Election Resources HIVHealthReform.org/HIVMedAccessAidsunited.orgWellstone.orgAFJ.orgVotesmart.org

46 HIV Med Access Campaign Partners Pete Subkoviak, Sarah Sobel, (Ohio AIDS Foundation of Chicago – Midwest Caressa Cameron – – Charles Stephens - AIDS United – Mid-Atlantic and South John Hellman, Latino Commission on AIDS – Latino community Ryan Clary, Project Inform – Northwest

47 Thank you and stay tuned for more! Pete Subkoviak ▫ AIDS Foundation of Chicago  Charles Stephens ▫ AIDS United 


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