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Chapter Nine: Voting and Elections 1. Learning Objectives Explain the difference between the voting-age population and the population of eligible voters.

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Presentation on theme: "Chapter Nine: Voting and Elections 1. Learning Objectives Explain the difference between the voting-age population and the population of eligible voters."— Presentation transcript:

1 Chapter Nine: Voting and Elections 1

2 Learning Objectives Explain the difference between the voting-age population and the population of eligible voters. Identify the factors that influence voter turnout in the United States and evaluate the turnout trends. Identify and evaluate the reasons for non-voting in the United States. Discuss problems that may result from low voter turnout. 2

3 Learning Objectives Describe and explain the significance of historical barriers to voting. Describe how elections are conducted, including the various types of ballot and methods of voting. Explain the function of Electoral College in presidential contests. 3

4 Learning Objectives Name and explain the significance of post-2000 electoral reforms. Weigh the risk of voter fraud with the value of high voter turnout in understanding voter registration. 4

5 Turning Out to Vote Voting Age Population: 231 million Eligible Voters: million Those who Voted: million (55%) 5

6 Turning Out to Vote 6

7 Effect of Low Voter Turnout  Some feel low voter participation is a threat to representative democratic government.  Others feel it represents satisfaction with the status quo. 7

8 Turning Out to Vote 8

9 9

10 Factors Influencing Who Votes  Age  Educational attainment  Minority status  Income level  Two-party competition 10

11 Turning Out to Vote Why People Do Not Vote  Uninformative Media Coverage  Negative Campaigning  Rational Ignorance Effect 11

12 Turning Out to Vote 12

13 Legal Restrictions on Voting Historical Restrictions: Property requirements Race Gender Age 13

14 Legal Restrictions on Voting Current Eligibility: Citizenship Must be 18 Residency 14

15 How Are Elections Conducted? The United States uses an Australian ballot, a secret ballot prepared, distributed, and counted by government officials at taxpayer expense. Office block ballot Party-column ballot 15

16 How Are Elections Conducted? 16

17 How Are Elections Conducted? 17

18 How Are Elections Conducted? Voting by Mail: usually used for absentee ballots Importance of Voting Machines 18

19 The Electoral College Choice of Electors: state’s number of electors equals that state’s number of senators (two) plus its number of representatives. Electors’ Commitment: electors are pledged to cast their votes for the candidate that wins in their state. The ballots are counted and certified before a joint session of Congress early in January. Candidates need 270 electoral votes to win. 19

20 The Electoral College Criticisms of the Electoral College  Critics say it is elitist to not let the people directly elect the president.  Presidential campaigning is focused on the states with the most electors.  System favors smaller states. 20

21 Web Links The Center for Voting and Democracy: a source of analysis and perspective on improving how elections are held in the United States: National Conference of State Legislatures: Find out what different states are doing to ensure the vote: 21

22 What If…Voting By Mail Became Universal? Oregon is the only state that has eliminated precinct polling places, and everyone votes by mail. Proponents argue that it is: the best way to increase voter participation more accurate cheaper 22

23 What If…Voting By Mail Became Universal? Critics of voting by mail argue that: it subverts the political process when voters cast ballots before debates and all information is available. it deprives voters of secrecy and increases possibility of fraud. represents abandonment of important civic duty of going to polls on election day. 23

24 You Can Make a Difference: Registering and Voting Nearly every state requires individuals to register to vote. Even though your vote is one of many, it adds to the constituency represented in the national, state, and local governing bodies. 24

25 You Can Make a Difference: Registering and Voting To register and cast a vote, you must: Be a U.S. citizen 18 years old Resident of the state in which you intend to register 25

26 You Can Make a Difference: Registering and Voting For more information on voting registration, contact your: county or state officials party headquarters labor union local chapter of the League of Women Voters at 26


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