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Causes of the Civil War Task Cards. Table of Contents ContentPage # Suggested Uses for Task Cards1 Lesson Plan Using Station Rotation Method2 Think Pair.

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Presentation on theme: "Causes of the Civil War Task Cards. Table of Contents ContentPage # Suggested Uses for Task Cards1 Lesson Plan Using Station Rotation Method2 Think Pair."— Presentation transcript:

1 Causes of the Civil War Task Cards

2 Table of Contents ContentPage # Suggested Uses for Task Cards1 Lesson Plan Using Station Rotation Method2 Think Pair Share Team Directions3 Task Cards4-12 Record Sheet13-14 Teacher’s Key15-17 Summarizing Strategy: Brain Check18 Thank You19

3 Suggested Uses for These Task Cards: Task cards are cards that contain a task or activity for students to complete. It can be used for both individual and group learning. Task cards are valuable because it encourages and promotes student investigation and higher level thought processes. Task cards are adaptable to meet the needs of students in the classroom and encourage students to develop questioning abilities. One of the greatest things about task cards is that they can be used in different ways. These cards can be used by all students, for students who are struggling with specific concepts and who need extra practice, or they can be used to provide enrichment for advanced learners. Listed below are suggested uses for these cards. Individual Use If students work individually to complete these cards you will need a method to keep track of who has completed the cards. Students could keep track of the cards that they have completed on the individual recording sheet, in your grade book, or on a chart kept at a station or on a bulletin board. You may also want to provide the answer key so that students can check their work. Suggestions for Alternative Task Card Use: Center Use: Make the center devoted specifically to this set of task card. Students would work on the cards during their designated center times or when they have extra time. Be sure students have a method to record their responses and a method to check their responses. This could be done individually or in cooperative learning groups. Station Rotation Method: Students rotate through each cards as an individual station collecting information and learning about content. This allows students to move from one task to another as an individual or in cooperative learning groups. To determine time allocations read the cards in advance and determine the level of difficulty according to the needs and ability levels of your students. On average, students will utilize 5 to 10 minutes per card when rotating between stations. Tips for utilizing Cards In Pairs or Small Groups: These task cards lend themselves to partner work or small groups. Here are some ideas: In learning pairs, students can take turns reading cards to each other and discuss their thoughts to answer questions. Individual record sheets can be utilized to record their responses. In small groups, a leader reads the card and the rest of the group discusses and writes their answers on individual response sheets. Stone September 27, 2013 page 1

4 Lesson Plan: Cooperative Learning: Station Rotation Method Activating Strategy: Post the lesson’s essential question and explain to students that today they will be conducting an investigation using task cards. These task cards utilize primary and secondary sources to allow students to develop inferences about what factors that led to the Civil War in the United States. Explain to students that at the end of our lesson they will be asked to respond to the lesson’s essential question that they had been investigating. Essential Question: During the 1800s tension developed and increased between the North and South in the United States. This ultimately led to the Civil War. Based on the documents provided, what factors led to increased tension between the North and South? Teaching Strategy: Utilizing cooperative grouping of Think-Pair Share Teaming, students will be divided into teams of two. In these teams, students will rotate from station to station analyzing the documents and recording their responses to thought questions. Print one set of the task cards and post them in advance outside in the hallway. This allows students space to work. They could also be posted at desks located around the room. To ensure efficient use of time and focus, a timer will be utilized to advance students between stations. As students work, the teacher will rotate between stations to monitor student performance and to question students about their interpretations. At the end of the lesson, the teacher would bring the class back together to discuss the documents to summarize what they discovered in their investigations. Summarizing Strategy : Provide students with a copy of a “Brain Check.” explain to students that a “Brain Check” is a teaching observation strategy in which teacher have the opportunity to determine what they have learned in class. Explain that a “Brain Check” allows people who learn in different methods to express their thoughts and ideas and different manners. At the top of the “Brain Check is their lessons essential question. Explain that their “Brain Check” is divided into two sides. The left side appears to be a half page of space with a heading “picture.” The right side is a space where a learner writes a response. It is divided this way because of how our brain works. The left side of our brain is our creative, artist side. The right side is our more analytical, reading writing side of our brain. Students read and respond to the essential question to summarize their individual understanding. They are allowed to utilize their record sheet from the activity to assist them. This can be assigned at the end of the lesson to complete as homework or to be used to summarize the lesson and shared that day. Students enjoy this because they can share their thoughts and ideas. As a teacher it is valuable because it provides information about individual student’s understanding and misconceptions. Stone September 27, 2013 page 2

5 What Is Think-Pair-Share? Think-Pair-Share is a cooperative discussion strategy developed by Frank Lyman and his colleagues in Maryland. It gets its name from the three stages of student action, with emphasis on what students are to be DOING at each of those stages. How Does It Work Using These Task Cards? 1) Think. Read the Thought Questions at the Station. The teacher provokes students' thinking with a question or prompt or observation. (task card) The students should take a few moments (probably not minutes) just to THINK about the question. 2) Pair. Using designated partners, students PAIR up to read, interpret, and talk about the document and the answer that they each came up with. They compare and identify the answer they think is best, most convincing, or most unique. They then record their response on their record sheet. (Students rotate to the next station when time is called) 3) Share. When all stations are complete, students are brought back together. Allow students to have a few moments (again, usually not minutes), to SHARE their thinking. Then allow pairs to share with the rest of the class. This can be done by going around in round- robin fashion, calling on each pair; or the teacher can take answers as they are called out (or as hands are raised). Often, the teacher or a designated helper will record these responses on the board or on chart paper for the class to see. Stone September 27, 2013 page 3

6 The Civil War was waged because 11 southern states seceded (broke away and started their own government) from the Union and formed the Confederate States of America. The secession took place primarily because of a longstanding debate concerning states rights, and more specifically the issue of slavery. As new territories became states, opponents of slavery and advocates of slavery often clashed over whether or not that state should allow slavery. After violence broke out in Kansas over the issue, and after Kansas entered the Union as a free state, southerners began to believe that the new president, Abraham Lincoln would take away their rights to make local decisions and would abolish slavery. Henceforth, Virginia, North and South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Tennessee, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas and Arkansas broke away from the Union and formed the Confederate States of America. Richmond, Virginia was made its capital and Jefferson Davis was made president. Kentucky, Maryland, Delaware and Missouri were divided on the issue and were declared "border states". Congress, in an effort to preserve the United States, declared war on the Confederate States of America on April 14, Thought Questions: 1.According to the text, what two reasons led to southern states seceding from the United States? 2.The south broke away from the Union and formed its own country. Describe in a paragraph the Confederate States of America. Be sure your paragraph answers the thought questions: who?, what?, why?, when, where?... That on the first day of January in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three [1863], all persons held as slaves within any State or designated part of a State, the people whereof [who] shall then be in rebellion against the United States, shall be then, thenceforward, and forever free; and the Executive Government of the United States, including the military and naval authority thereof, will recognize and maintain the freedom of such persons, and will do no act or acts to repress such persons, or any of them, in any efforts they may make for their actual freedom.... Emancipation Proclamation Source: Library of Congress Directions: Use the excerpt from the Emancipation proclamation, to answer the following thought questions. Thought Questions: 1.When was this document in effect? 2.Based on this document, the Emancipation Proclamation was intended to free slaves in which area? 3.Based on this document, did the Emancipation Proclamation free all of the slaves living in the United States or some? Explain your thoughts. Use text evidence to support your beliefs. Task Card 2Task Card 1 Stone September 27, 2013 page 4

7 This excerpt was first published in the abolitionist newspaper The North Star on April 3, It discusses the Fugitive Slave Law passed by Congress on September 18, The following resolutions were adopted at the recent Convention of the Western New York Anti-Slavery Society, held in Corinthian Hall: Resolved [Agreed],...That they who teach obedience to the Fugitive Slave Law, while they admit that the law is unjust, cruel and disgraceful, prove themselves destitute of moral principle, if not of moral sense, and they are to be ranked with the hardened and obdurate [heartless] creatures who, for a few paltry dollars, will perform the disgusting office of slave- catcher to the slaveholder.... Resolved, That we regard the Fugitive Slave Law of the last Congress as a conspiracy against the liberties of our country, which ought to be resisted at all hazards of property and life, by all who love God and revere [honor] the memories of our revolutionary fathers. Thought Questions: 1. When and why was this document written? 2. Based on this document, how did the writer feel about the issue of slavery? 3. How does the author feel about people who follow the law? Use text evidence to support your opinion. Directions: Examine the poster. In your own words describe what kind of event was happening. Who was having this event? What was their point of view? What were they hoping to accomplish? Use the words in the word bank provided to describe what this poster is about. Word Bank: abolitionists, slavery, women, against, freedom, Task Card 3 Source: Deborah Bingham Van Broekhoven, The Devotion of These Women: Rhode Island in the Antislavery Network, University of Massachusetts Press, 2002 (adapted) Task Card 4 Stone September 27, 2013 page 5

8 Task Card 5Task Card 6 Stone September 27, 2013 page 6

9 Thought Questions: 1.Based on these documents, how did the use of the cotton gin change the way cotton was processed? 2.Compare the value of slaves and the amount of cotton produced in 1800 and in What was the cost of a slave at an auction before the invention of the cotton gin and after? How much cotton was grown in 1800? How much cotton was grown in 1860? 3.Based on these documents, how did the invention of the cotton gin effect the number of slaves and the amount of cotton grown in the south? Task Card 7 Directions: Carefully examine task card 5-6. Use the information you have learned to answer the thought questions below. Historical Context: Eli Whitney invented the mechanical cotton gin in Before this invention, removing seeds from cotton was very time consuming. The Story of Eliza Harris escape from slavery which was made famous in the book Uncle Tom’s Cabin. Task Card 8 Thought Questions: 1.What caused Eliza to run away from her owners? 2.Describe the dangers that Eliza faced on her journey to freedom? Stone September 27, 2013 page 7

10 Economic and Historical Context: To fight a war and to win each side needs to have certain resources. Historians acknowledge that some of the resources needed to fight a war would be soldiers to fight, money to purchase supplies, food to feed troops, supplies like weapons, clothes, boots, and methods to transport soldiers to areas of battle quickly. Directions: Carefully examine the graph provided on task card 9. Create a chart indicating the strengths and weaknesses of each side. Be sure to indicate the percentage below. Economic Factors North S- strength W-weakness South S- strength W-weakness Ex. PopulationS-71% More soldiers W-29% Fewer soldiers Money Food Transport Supplies Task Card 9 Task Card 10 Stone September 27, 2013 page 8

11 Look at your photograph carefully and answer as many of these questions as you can: The Setting: Where was the photograph taken — indoors, outdoors, in an urban area, or in the country? During what time of day was it taken? What time of year? How do you know? The People: Who are the people in the photograph — men, women, boys, girls? How old are they? What can you tell about them from the clothes they are wearing? The Moment: What activity or event is shown in the photograph? What are the people doing? Are they doing it as a group or individually? What relationship, if any, do they seem to have with one another? Other Clues: What other details can you see in the photograph? Are there any tools, vehicles, animals, buildings, or signs? What do these tell you about the people, time, or event shown? Primary Source Documents: Examining Photographs Task Card 11 Task Card 12 Stone September 27, 2013 page 9

12 Thought Questions: 1.Based on the President’s words what was his goal? 2.How does he feel about slavery? Provide evidence to support your opinion. Soon after Abraham Lincoln was elected to the presidency in November 1860, seven Southern states seceded from the Union. In March 1861, after he was inaugurated as the 16th President of the United States, four more followed. Directions: Read the words of President Lincoln. Task Card 13 Task Card 14 Stone September 27, 2013 page 10

13 Historical Content: Differences between the North and South were evident in the beliefs of the people, economies, and goals. These differences developed during the first part of the 1800's as the North and the South developed different economies. In the North, cities were centers of wealth and manufacturing. There were many skilled workers. In the South there was not much manufacturing. There were not many skilled workers. Most of the people were farmers. Money came from plantation crops, like cotton, rice, sugar cane and tobacco. Slaves did most of the work on the plantations. Thought Questions: 1.Based on the documents provided, state two differences between the North and South before the Civil War Task Card 16 Task Card 15 Stone September 27, 2013 page 11

14 Task Card 17 Task Card 18 Historical Context: Before Lincoln became president, there was already much sectional tension between the North and the South, mostly over slavery and its expansion into the west. While slavery was illegal in most Northern states, it was still the basis of the South’s economy. With the presidential election of 1860, Abraham Lincoln, a self-taught Illinois lawyer and legislator, had a reputation as an eloquent opponent of slavery. His election to president shocked many when he overcame several more prominent contenders to win the presidency. Thought Questions: 1.Based on the map, which section of the country supported the election of Abraham Lincoln? Which section was against the election of Abraham Lincoln? 2.Who did many southern states support for president? 3.Many historians have called President Lincoln a “sectional president.” Explain why he was called this. Stone September 27, 2013 page 12

15 Name ______________Causes of the Civil War Investigation Record Sheet Task Card # Primary / Secondary Source Written Response: 1 Paragraph on separate paper Write on separate paper 5-7 Stone September 27, 2013 page 13

16 Task Card # Primary / Secondary Source Written Response: Economic FactorsNorth (s=strength w= weakness) South (s=strength w= weakness) Population Money Food Transport Supplies Stone September 27, 2013 page 14

17 Name _Teacher’s key_Causes of the Civil War Investigation Record Sheet Task Card Primary / Secondary Source Written Response: 1Secondary1.Southern states seceded from the Union because of a longstanding debate concerning states rights, and more specifically the issue of slavery. 2.Paragraph describing Confederate States should include: idea of formed country and states included etc. 2Primary1.The document was put into effect January 1, This document freed slaves in the areas of the country that were fighting against the North. 3.The document frees some of the slaves in the United States. It freed only those slaves in the parts of the country that were in rebellion. Students should provide a text quote to support this. 3Primary1.This document was written April 3, 1951 in a newspaper to discuss the Fugitive Slave Law. 2.The author of the document was against slavery and wanted it to be abolished. 3.The author feels that people who follow the law are just as bad as the people who catch slaves for the slave owners. They have no morals. (Students will use text evidence) 4Primary Paragraph written describing the event 5-7 Secondary 1.The cotton gin took the seeds out of the cotton easier and faster than slaves removing it by hand. 2.In 1800 the value of a slave was $600 at auction. The value of a slave after the invention of the cotton gin was $1800. In 1800 planters grew 73,000 bales of cotton. In 1860 they grew 3,841,000 bales of cotton. 3.The invention of the Cotton Gin increased the number of slaves and it increased the amount of cotton grown in the south. 8Primary1.Eliza ran away from her owners because she thought that her master was going to sell Eliza and or her son and separate them. 2.Answers will vary but students should describe that Eliza had to hid in order to avoid capture so she traveled at night as well as the dangers of crossing ice covered rivers. Stone September 27, 2013 page 15

18 9-10 SecondaryChart : Created See separate slide PrimaryPossible responses: A cotton field in the south during the day, 1867, Georgia cotton field, Decatur,GA. The individuals in the photo appear to be girls who are slaves who are picking cotton. They seem to be young. They are wearing old worn out tattered clothes. 13 Primary1.The president’s goal was to save the union and keep it united as one country. 2.The president wishes that all slaves were free. Students should cite the quote from the text, “I intend no modification of my oft-expressed personal wish that all men everywhere could be free” Secondary1. Varying responses: Sample: Two differences that were different between the North and South were that they had different economies. The North’s economy was based on manufacturing goods that they exported and the south’s economy was based on the sale of cotton. The North transported goods via the railroad where as the south had fewer railroads. Students might also discuss labor Secondary1.Based on the map, The North supported the election of Abraham Lincoln as president. The south was against the election of Lincoln as president. 2.Many southern states supported John C. Breckinridge as president. 3.President Lincoln was called a “sectional president” because only a part of the country voted for him to be president. The south did not elect him. None of the southern states wanted Lincoln for president. Stone September 27, 2013 page 16

19 Economic FactorsNorth S= strength W= weakness South S= strength W= weakness Ex. PopulationS- 71%, more soldiersW- 29%, fewer soldiers MoneyS- 81% of countries moneyW- 19% of countries money FoodS- 72%W-28% TransportS- Horses 72% faster to move soldiers W-Mules 29% S- 71% railroad troops and supplies W- 28% S-Mules 71% pull large loads W- railroad SuppliesS-86% factories, produce weapons, uniforms, etc W-14% did not have ability to produce as much weapons and uniforms Teacher’s Key Supplement: Task card 9-10 Stone September 27, 2013 page 17

20 Name ______________________Date __________ Brain Check: Causes of the Civil War Investigation Directions: Read the essential question that you were investigating. Use the information that you gathered during your investigation to answer the question. Essential Question: During the 1800s tension developed and increased between the North and South in the United States. This ultimately led to the Civil War. Based on the documents provided, what factors led to increased tension between the North and South? Picture Paragraph (s) Stone September 27, 2013 page 18

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