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PRESS“ENTER” TO BEGIN SHOW The PREVIEW will then run automatically. Running time of this preview is approximately 9 minutes 9 MINUTE SILENT PREVIEW OF.

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Presentation on theme: "PRESS“ENTER” TO BEGIN SHOW The PREVIEW will then run automatically. Running time of this preview is approximately 9 minutes 9 MINUTE SILENT PREVIEW OF."— Presentation transcript:

1 PRESS“ENTER” TO BEGIN SHOW The PREVIEW will then run automatically. Running time of this preview is approximately 9 minutes 9 MINUTE SILENT PREVIEW OF The Piranesi Project by © Randolph Langenbach, 2003 The normal running time for the full show is approximately 50 minutes, with musical accompaniment.

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10 “When I first saw the remains of the ancient buildings of Rome lying as they do in cultivated fields or gardens and wasting away under the ravages of time, or being destroyed by greedy owners who sell them as materials for modern buildings, I determined to preserve them for ever by means of my engravings.” Giambattista Piranesi, Le Antichita` Romane, 1756.

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15 Put an end to the abuses which have long excited our indignation....

16 ... Public buildings, in which all the ornament of the city consisted, have been destroyed with the criminal permission of the authorities on the pretext that the materials were necessary for public works.... Public buildings, in which all the ornament of the city consisted, have been destroyed with the criminal permission of the authorities on the pretext that the materials were necessary for public works. The splendid structures of ancient buildings have been overthrown, and the great has been everywhere destroyed in order to erect the little.

17 Emporer Marjorian,

18 in the year 458

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23 Rome was! But neither years nor flames nor the sword can wholly wreck her beauty. The care of men built Rome [so well] that no efforts of the gods can undo her. Rome was! But neither years nor flames nor the sword can wholly wreck her beauty. The care of men built Rome [so well] that no efforts of the gods can undo her. Hildebert of Lavardin, 1116

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52 ... the accumulation of a soil … rises over dead Rome like a flood-tide.... the accumulation of a soil … rises over dead Rome like a flood-tide. Nathanial Hawthorne, 1859

53 ... the accumulation of a soil … rises over dead Rome like a flood-tide.... the accumulation of a soil … rises over dead Rome like a flood-tide. Nathanial Hawthorne, 1859

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82 “[The Colosseum] is the most impressive, the most stately, the most solemn, grand, majestic, mournful sight, conceivable.... “[The Colosseum] is the most impressive, the most stately, the most solemn, grand, majestic, mournful sight, conceivable....

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84 ... Never, in its bloodiest prime, can the sight of the gigantic Coliseum...have moved one heart, as it must move all who look upon it now – a ruin GOD be thanked: a ruin!” Charles Dickens, Letters from Italy, 1846

85 ... Never, in its bloodiest prime, can the sight of the gigantic Coliseum...have moved one heart, as it must move all who look upon it now – a ruin GOD be thanked: a ruin!” Charles Dickens, Letters from Italy, 1846

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109 “Preservation…involves an understanding of [a] ruin as a ruin, and its re-creation as a work of art in its own right....A ruin is more than a collection of debris. It is a place with its own individuality, charged with its own emotion and atmosphere and drama, of grandeur, of nobility, or charm. These qualities must be preserved as carefully as the broken stones which are their physical embodiment.” Sir Kenneth Clark, 1945

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137 “These ruins have filled my spirit with images that accurate drawings…could never have succeeded in conveying...

138 ...Therefore, having the idea of presenting to the world some of these images, but have little hope that an architect of these times could effectively execute some of them…there seems to be no recourse than for me... to explain [my] ideas through [my] drawings and so to take away from sculpture and painting the advantage …they now have over architecture.” Giambattista Piranesi (from Columbia University exhibition catalogue)

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148 “Every new empire has claimed to be the heir of Rome, but if such a colossus as Rome can crumble – its ruins ask – why not London,... or New York? Sir Kenneth Clark, 1945

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157 ©Randolph Langenbach, 2003

158 COME SEE THE FULL SHOW!

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